Got the look

Help Support CattleToday:

BFE

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2017
Messages
2,377
Reaction score
3,026
Location
Southeast Illinois
C1B0B3E2-5298-4DB0-983C-B5230533D552.jpeg
This ad popped up while reading an article on SmokinM's post about Illinois politics.

Breed leading data and looks… I would say he does have breed leading looks. Am I wrong or is he leading the looks department in all the wrong ways?

I don't think there's much to like here but I am no expert. He's got a name though so he must be a winner.
 
Straight topline which is good. But hips show a flat muscle pattern. I do not quite understand the extended neck in bulls. I don't need that. I like the rear leg set in Lot1. Overall, not my cup of tea.

Even in good herds that have some right direction, the stride is a big fault. So many current Angus bulls are bound up in the hips or are tending to post legged that the rear legs chop instead of stride and step in the track of the front hoof. The breed continues to breed marvels by numbers. But the definition of marvel is fuzzy.
 
View attachment 22078
They keep popping up. I was checking the local news when this one appeared.
I had an old yeller dog once that looked like a boney cur... but if you put a leash on him he became proud and beautiful. The transformation was amazing. I've seen pictures of feral studs that looked like hell, but if another stud approaches they puff up and arch their necks and suddenly they look like thunder and lightning. If you take an average looking, lightly muscled bull and get him to raise his head, he takes a better picture.
 
Don't think the photos flatter either bull . Back legs aren't correct to show the true look of either bull . Maybe the best the photographer could do with the subjects he had ?? 🤔
 
Not a fan of either of those bulls but checked on their auction video link and they do have some others that look pretty nice. Also selling some amazing looking cow calf pairs. Udders on the sale cows all look pretty flawless.
 
Personally I think this is a case of ''Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder."
 
May be something to that "beauty in the eye of the beholder" thing. Lot 1 bull had an adjusted weaning weight of 887 and a feed conversion of 4.79 pounds of feed for 1 pound of gain. He sold for $15,000. What makes a good bull or cow? Looks "good"? Grows well? Heavy muscling? Easy keeping? Moves out well? Docile? I suspect that profitability should be pretty important. I think those profitability factors depend on when you are selling and who you are selling to. I think the cow-calf guy has a strong visual of what they expect cows and calves to look like to fit their market and conditions and ideals. I suspect that producers who retain ownership all the way put far less emphasis on looks and more on the efficiency and carcass traits. Feed conversion, carcass and efficiency would be big contributors to profitability in the feedlot, I think.
He does look like a pot gutted slab - from my cow-calf producer perspective. Lot 8 sold for $12,000.
 
May be something to that "beauty in the eye of the beholder" thing. Lot 1 bull had an adjusted weaning weight of 887 and a feed conversion of 4.79 pounds of feed for 1 pound of gain. He sold for $15,000. What makes a good bull or cow? Looks "good"? Grows well? Heavy muscling? Easy keeping? Moves out well? Docile? I suspect that profitability should be pretty important. I think those profitability factors depend on when you are selling and who you are selling to. I think the cow-calf guy has a strong visual of what they expect cows and calves to look like to fit their market and conditions and ideals. I suspect that producers who retain ownership all the way put far less emphasis on looks and more on the efficiency and carcass traits. Feed conversion, carcass and efficiency would be big contributors to profitability in the feedlot, I think.
He does look like a pot gutted slab - from my cow-calf producer perspective. Lot 8 sold for $12,000.
Sort of an terminal outlier?
 

Latest posts

Top