• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Get ready for another hit on beef prices

Help Support CattleToday:

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
At this year's International Production and Processing Expo, Mark Dopp who is vice president of regulatory affairs with the North American Meat Institute delivered some bad news. The United Nations' World Health Organization's International Agency on Cancer will be publishing a paper sometime this summer saying that ALL red meat is possibly carcinogenic and ALL processed meat IS carcinogenic. Also the World Cancer Research Fund is also set to publish something similar later this year.

Not to miss an opportunity, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, is currently petitioning the USDA to put warning labels on red meat similar to those found on tobacco products. The CSPI is a lobby group founded and run by Michael Jacobson who you may know better as a sitting chairman on the National Council of the Great American Meatout, the annual event sponsored by Farm Animal Rights Movement, that encourages people to "kick the meat habit" for a day. Jacobson has probably influenced you already by his coining the terms "junk food" and "empty calorie" so he knows how to get his message out. He is a strong advocate for higher taxes on unhealthy foods, greater use of warning labels on food and beverage packaging, restrictions on advertising and selling junk foods and lawsuits against food producers such as ourselves for producing red meat which everyone in the world will soon know causes cancer.

This just may be a windfall for the folks at the United Nations who have long said the production of red meat is wasteful and because the grain use in meat production would better be use to feed all those starving children in Africa. Don't mean to be political but I see no way around it when the politics are fixing to be at our doorstep this summer. It will be interesting to see what happens and how this will effect us. Just wanted to share this because I thought it important.
 

Waterway65

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2014
Messages
222
Reaction score
0
Location
South Dakota
I am still alive and well and according to your post I should be dead! I think they should worry a lot more about are sugar consumption in this country. Everything in moderation. The Lord provided everything for our use.
 

True Grit Farms

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
9,453
Reaction score
3
Location
Middle Georgia
The US of A needs to cut spending to the UN by 50%. Sure wish we could find a way to send all the liberals and vegans to Iraq.
 

True Grit Farms

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 4, 2016
Messages
9,453
Reaction score
3
Location
Middle Georgia
Bright Raven":3snrq1n4 said:
A yawn. Nothing New! Concept has been around since Hector was a pup.

A dogs adverage lifespan is only 10-13 years. For the last 8 years we had a donkey and the previous 8 years a lame duck. Maybe the new bull will make a difference.
 

Bright Raven

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
10,701
Reaction score
2
Location
Kentucky
True Grit Farms":1k10zi4s said:
Bright Raven":1k10zi4s said:
A yawn. Nothing New! Concept has been around since Hector was a pup.

A dogs adverage lifespan is only 10-13 years. For the last 8 years we had a donkey and the previous 8 years a lame duck. Maybe the new bull will make a difference.

I hope he can. At the least, he is far more entertaining.
 
OP
Jogeephus

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
Ron I'm glad you don't think this will make a difference to cattle prices but the meat industry is pretty upset but I guess that's another industry altogether and has nothing to do with us.
 

Bright Raven

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
10,701
Reaction score
2
Location
Kentucky
Jogeephus":t4hcvk6p said:
Ron I'm glad you don't think this will make a difference to cattle prices but the meat industry is pretty upset but I guess that's another industry altogether and has nothing to do with us.

My good friend. The concept that red meat is linked to atherosclerosis and cancer is now older than I am and I ain't no spring chicken. Those that eat red meat (and the number is still increasing) ignore it or don't believe it. I don't think a label or pounding the drum louder is going to change that. At least not enough that you and I will see any difference in our business.
 
OP
Jogeephus

Jogeephus

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
24,228
Reaction score
0
Location
South Georgia
I hope you are right Ron and I agree this myth has been around for a long time but this is the first time the United Nations and the World Health Organization have decided to push this agenda and this is where I think you and I have to disagree because I think it will make a difference but I will be more than happy to be wrong.

Seems the last prediction I made on the beef market was met with the same degree of concern. I suggested tightening our belts after Obama's speech where he said beef needed to be made more affordable for the poor. While I cut my herd numbers down many expanded thinking they were assured a profit. Shortly thereafter Obama forgot about hoof and mouth and opened the doors to S. American imports.

I don't know what to do in this situation but if it gets some traction in social media I do think the millenials will run with it and it will have an effect on us all. But again, I hope I'm wrong.
 

Bright Raven

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
10,701
Reaction score
2
Location
Kentucky
Jogeephus":2qh8eu9l said:
I hope you are right Ron and I agree this myth has been around for a long time but this is the first time the United Nations and the World Health Organization have decided to push this agenda and this is where I think you and I have to disagree because I think it will make a difference but I will be more than happy to be wrong.

Seems the last prediction I made on the beef market was met with the same degree of concern. I suggested tightening our belts after Obama's speech where he said beef needed to be made more affordable for the poor. While I cut my herd numbers down many expanded thinking they were assured a profit. Shortly thereafter Obama forgot about hoof and mouth and opened the doors to S. American imports.

I don't know what to do in this situation but if it gets some traction in social media I do think the millenials will run with it and it will have an effect on us all. But again, I hope I'm wrong.

I hope I am right too.

Think about this: half the World population is malnourished and the other half are advised to pursue a healthy diet. I know one thing we can agree on: the children starving in Africa who are faced with getting enough food to make it into the morrow are glad to dine on red meat.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Bright Raven":1qsr9jue said:
Jogeephus":1qsr9jue said:
I hope you are right Ron and I agree this myth has been around for a long time but this is the first time the United Nations and the World Health Organization have decided to push this agenda and this is where I think you and I have to disagree because I think it will make a difference but I will be more than happy to be wrong.

Seems the last prediction I made on the beef market was met with the same degree of concern. I suggested tightening our belts after Obama's speech where he said beef needed to be made more affordable for the poor. While I cut my herd numbers down many expanded thinking they were assured a profit. Shortly thereafter Obama forgot about hoof and mouth and opened the doors to S. American imports.

I don't know what to do in this situation but if it gets some traction in social media I do think the millenials will run with it and it will have an effect on us all. But again, I hope I'm wrong.

I hope I am right too.

Think about this: half the World population is malnourished and the other half are advised to pursue a healthy diet. I know one thing we can agree on: the children starving in Africa who are faced with getting enough food to make it into the morrow are glad to dine on red meat.
Not just Africa. I read that Venezuelans have on average lost 19 lbs per person last year. They are slowly starving. Wonder how the nutritional value of cats, dogs and pigeons compare to beef? Maybe the U.N should do a study. I heard a U.S. FARM REPORT commentator make the statement that all food products should have this label... "If you eat this product, you will die". Though he said it with sarcasm.
 

R V

Well-known member
Joined
May 1, 2012
Messages
203
Reaction score
1
Location
Southwest Missouri
Institutionally elite vegan extremism in the 70's-80's pushed low fat diets "with facts" that retrospectively were lies and studies designed for a particular outcome (goal of decreasing/eliminating meat intake) and not based on true outcomes. Sort of like the Kellogg cereal company study that showed that eggs were bad for you. Isn't it interesting that the only person living from the 1800's (Italy) eats 2 eggs for breakfast every day. She was still independent and living in her own apartment when she turned 117 years old. I think she still is, but I haven't seen any recent articles on her.

Instead of improving health and lifespan, low fat diets have expedited the opposite extreme to such and extent that even the government under a liberal denounced low fat diets. I give the Obama administration their due on this and was/am impressed. In addition to the obesity epidemic, I think the current epidemic of dementia in young thin "healthy appearing" women probably helped expedite this. I have a patient who is not quite 50 and low risk who has severe dementia and can't find her way home nor recognize her children part of the time. It appears dairy fats, yes animal fats, significantly decrease this risk. (Several fresh fruits and vegetables and physical exercise also appear important in prevention- no surprise with these though.) Sadly and unfortunately, the latest data I read had vegetarians dying earlier than omnivores. This is a first as far as I know. I have my theories on this, but that is all they are and not worth delineating.

In regards to our cattle economics and business, only time will tell how much impact these latest attempts will have. Hopefully, not much!
 

boondocks

Well-known member
Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
2,594
Reaction score
0
Location
Upstate NY
R V":cgkrtto0 said:
Institutionally elite vegan extremism in the 70's-80's pushed low fat diets "with facts" that retrospectively were lies and studies designed for a particular outcome (goal of decreasing/eliminating meat intake) and not based on true outcomes. Sort of like the Kellogg cereal company study that showed that eggs were bad for you. Isn't it interesting that the only person living from the 1800's (Italy) eats 2 eggs for breakfast every day. She was still independent and living in her own apartment when she turned 117 years old. I think she still is, but I haven't seen any recent articles on her.

Instead of improving health and lifespan, low fat diets have expedited the opposite extreme to such and extent that even the government under a liberal denounced low fat diets. I give the Obama administration their due on this and was/am impressed. In addition to the obesity epidemic, I think the current epidemic of dementia in young thin "healthy appearing" women probably helped expedite this. I have a patient who is not quite 50 and low risk who has severe dementia and can't find her way home nor recognize her children part of the time. It appears dairy fats, yes animal fats, significantly decrease this risk. (Several fresh fruits and vegetables and physical exercise also appear important in prevention- no surprise with these though.) Sadly and unfortunately, the latest data I read had vegetarians dying earlier than omnivores. This is a first as far as I know. I have my theories on this, but that is all they are and not worth delineating.

In regards to our cattle economics and business, only time will tell how much impact these latest attempts will have. Hopefully, not much!

I don't recall that the low-fat craze was pushed by vegans--more like food conglomerates that wished us to buy higher sugar lower fat cookies (Snackwells anyone?). At any rate I am curious about the data on lifespan. If in fact there is credible objective evidence of meateaters living longer (and healthier) can you share? It would be great to have in hand for when vegan/vegetarians give me the side eye! A quick search found this as the first "legit" source I saw (and it doesn't say meateaters live longer or better): http://time.com/9463/7-reasons-vegetarians-live-longer/
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
boondocks":2yo16fg6 said:
If in fact there is credible objective evidence of meateaters living longer (and healthier) can you share? It would be great to have in hand for when vegan/vegetarians give me the side eye! A quick search found this as the first "legit" source I saw (and it doesn't say meateaters live longer or better): http://time.com/9463/7-reasons-vegetarians-live-longer/
Carnivores probably just enjoy eating more and the veggies just seem to feel like they live longer because their diet makes it seem like life just drags on.
 

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,327
Reaction score
34
Location
Cleveland Tx
I know one thing..I already outlived Euell Gibbons..
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,032
Reaction score
143
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
dun":1stpx2r8 said:
boondocks":1stpx2r8 said:
If in fact there is credible objective evidence of meateaters living longer (and healthier) can you share? It would be great to have in hand for when vegan/vegetarians give me the side eye! A quick search found this as the first "legit" source I saw (and it doesn't say meateaters live longer or better): http://time.com/9463/7-reasons-vegetarians-live-longer/
Carnivores probably just enjoy eating more and the veggies just seem to feel like they live longer because their diet makes it seem like life just drags on.
HAHAHA, I think this is the best post I've seen in a long time!


Well, if they're going to label possible carcinogens, they should just be REALLY THOROUGH about it.. I'm sure soy has carcinogenic properties.. as do tomatoes, and probably everything else.

This came on my news feed today... Prop 65 warning is based on a 1 in 100,000 chance of causing cancer... so at that rate anything is possible
http://www.agdaily.com/insights/farm-ba ... alifornia/
 

1wlimo

Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Messages
742
Reaction score
0
Location
Alberta
dun":1cjk3rfs said:
boondocks":1cjk3rfs said:
If in fact there is credible objective evidence of meateaters living longer (and healthier) can you share? It would be great to have in hand for when vegan/vegetarians give me the side eye! A quick search found this as the first "legit" source I saw (and it doesn't say meateaters live longer or better): http://time.com/9463/7-reasons-vegetarians-live-longer/
Carnivores probably just enjoy eating more and the veggies just seem to feel like they live longer because their diet makes it seem like life just drags on.

This is the problem, compare the average omnivore with a health conscious person they will not live as long, weather that health conscious person eats meat or not. The studies do not look at this, they just lump the general population against the health conscious vegan. Not really looking at meat as opposed to exercise and obesity etc.
 

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,327
Reaction score
34
Location
Cleveland Tx
Smoked pork can change all this--for any vegan, no matter how dedicated, bacon is THE gateway meat. It's why they rail against it so much. One strip, and they're hooked for life.
 

Latest posts

Top