garden scraps

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Anonymous

We are harvesting our garden after last week's frost. I know the corn stalks are fine for the heifer, but what about the sunflower stalks (and even heads), squash, pea, and bean vines. I know tomato plants are toxic, but what about the rest of these. Should I just put them in the compost or can they be a treat for the heifer.

While I'm at it, my gal is getting bred in 6 weeks. Besides the ivomec injectable that I give her in the fall, are there other things I should do before she's bred? Her annual shots are due in Jan. I'm always grateful for the help you give us newbies.

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Anonymous

Vaccinations depend on your locale. In Texas Panhandle region we use either a 5-way or 7-way vaccination. Also, Brucellosis (Bangs) must be given to heifers by a Vet and certified (in Texas, before 12 months of age). Bulls usually also given vaccination for venereal diseases.

De-worming Fall & Spring with injectible. Our Vet prefers Dectomax over Ivomec--he says it's better and about same (overly priced) price.

As long as cattle have options to eat things and good hay or grass, they usually won't eat anything toxic. One problem with garden plants that have seeds is that you will re-seed them in cow manure. Potato plants can also be toxic. When in doubt, put stuff in compost pile for later tilling back into your garden. Another potential problem with green garden foliage is that since gardens are usually fertilized, some plants might have too high level of nitrates in them that might harm livestock.

Texas A & M University has sub-sites you can look at on Toxic Plants...excellent information! Some other university sites do too, but can't remember which ones.

Good luck!



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Anonymous

The other problem with feeding garden waste is quick spoilage -- green leaves wilt quickly and a lot of *safe* plants become toxic once they're cut and start to wilt (2-3 hours).

Here in Nebraska, Bangs vaccination in not required for heifers that will remain in the state. There are vitually no restictions on these unvaccinated cattle leaving the state and going to another Brucellosis Free state, or a Class A state. Heifers entering this state from a Brucellosis Free or Class A state, must be vaccinated if over 18 months old. There are stricter requirements for animals entering from other states.

For example (and this comes from my vet, who moves animals between these 2 states all the time), heifers/cows that are not returning, can travel from Nebraska to Missouri with no paperwork, no vaccinations. Heifers under 18 months of age can travel from Missouri into Nebraska with no paperwork, no vaccinations. But heifers between 18 and 24 months who travel from Missouri to Nebraska must be Bangs vaccinated.

Ann B

> Vaccinations depend on your
> locale. In Texas Panhandle region
> we use either a 5-way or 7-way
> vaccination. Also, Brucellosis
> (Bangs) must be given to heifers
> by a Vet and certified (in Texas,
> before 12 months of age). Bulls
> usually also given vaccination for
> venereal diseases.

> De-worming Fall & Spring with
> injectible. Our Vet prefers
> Dectomax over Ivomec--he says it's
> better and about same (overly
> priced) price.

> As long as cattle have options to
> eat things and good hay or grass,
> they usually won't eat anything
> toxic. One problem with garden
> plants that have seeds is that you
> will re-seed them in cow manure.
> Potato plants can also be toxic.
> When in doubt, put stuff in
> compost pile for later tilling
> back into your garden. Another
> potential problem with green
> garden foliage is that since
> gardens are usually fertilized,
> some plants might have too high
> level of nitrates in them that
> might harm livestock.

> Texas A & M University has
> sub-sites you can look at on Toxic
> Plants...excellent information!
> Some other university sites do
> too, but can't remember which
> ones.

> Good luck!



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