Fuel storage ideas?

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tom4018

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I have always bought and transported my fuel in 5 gallon cans as we had a place close by that sold off road diesel. Well they went bankrupt this winter and my only sourse is on highway fuel. I only use about 200 gallon a year, debated getting me a 100 gallon tank and picking it up a bilk plant about 30 miles away. They want at least 200 gallon to deliver and really did not want to buy a years worth of fuel at once. New tanks are expensive and not had any luck finding a good used one, plenty of bigger tanks around though. Thought about using barrels and getting 2 at a time. Worse thig is unloading them as I don't have pallet forks, got an old farm house with a back porsh that is concrete about the same height as my truck bed and might be able to slide them over on it. Just need to come up with a pump system. I can save 50 cents a gallon on the fule so it will save me a $100 a year, any ides for a cheap storage or transport system?
 

S&S Farms

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I would not put it in barrels. Do you have a trailer you could put a pickup bed tank on an tow it to pick up your fuel? I would also think that as long as you have a fuel permit for off road you can send in to the state and get the road tax back if you purchase road fuel.
 
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tom4018

tom4018

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S&S Farms":34ug439h said:
I would not put it in barrels. Do you have a trailer you could put a pickup bed tank on an tow it to pick up your fuel? I would also think that as long as you have a fuel permit for off road you can send in to the state and get the road tax back if you purchase road fuel.
In Ky you can't get the refund if you buy from retail outlets, you have to buy from a bulk dealer. Why not barrels? Just curious if there is something I am not thinking about. One the the 100 gallon tanks like TSC sells fits the need but don't fit my wallet.
 

dun

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A 55 gallon barrel with a hurdy gurdy type of hand pump will work. When I used barrels I made a frame that the barel stood upright in and put a hook at each of the 4 corners. A chain from the bucket of the tractor to each of the hooks worked great for lifting the barrels in and out of the truck
 

cfpinz

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I'd keep an eye out for a used tank and pump for the back of a truck, you'll appreciate it in the long run. I picked up a used 105g l-tank and pump at a sale for $275. Might want to check craigslist and the local "Bucksaver" or the likes if your area has one.
 
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tom4018

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cfpinz":2xkptuvc said:
I'd keep an eye out for a used tank and pump for the back of a truck, you'll appreciate it in the long run. I picked up a used 105g l-tank and pump at a sale for $275. Might want to check craigslist and the local "Bucksaver" or the likes if your area has one.
Been trying that for a while with no luck, find plenty of 300 gallon or larger tanks. Found one 100 gallon tank looks a little rough and it has used oil in it, worried as to how much sludge is in it, pump is really not any good on it, none of the radiator shop around here will clean them either. One thing I thought about the plastic barrels is no rust problems.
 

hillrancher

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You will get water into the fuel if you use barrels. If they are are hot when it rains and they are up where the bung or vent gets water over it they will cool and suck the water in. They rust fast and condense bad. You will save the cost of a properly designed fuel tank on the cost of filters and injection parts in a very few years.
 
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tom4018

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hillrancher":4hoka0b0 said:
You will get water into the fuel if you use barrels. If they are are hot when it rains and they are up where the bung or vent gets water over it they will cool and suck the water in. They rust fast and condense bad. You will save the cost of a properly designed fuel tank on the cost of filters and injection parts in a very few years.

Was going to use plastic drums and they would be kept under roof. You still think that would be bad?
 

crats

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hay, what about a chemical tote, you know the kind that round up or something like that comes in they hold about 230 gallons have a top and a valve on the bottom. they will not hold up to sunshine for very long though. as for barrels they need to be stored on a 2x4 with the bungs at 180 or the same direction as the board. this will keep the water from getting over the bungs and help keep it clean and dry. i got a tote for a basket to work out of when placed on my hay spikes it makes a great platfrom to cut trees and limbs that scrape the tractor cab, muffler and the like i can trim trees 15' off the ground
 

1982vett

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Brute 23":3ndaxbc6 said:
At 200g a year... just buy the highway diesel. ;-)
You just need to get receipts (gallons purchased) to claim your state and federal fuel tax credit. Line 10 on Schedule F.
 

cre10

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Keep an eye out at TSC or the farm stores in your area. At the one in my area sometimes they have scratch and dent or returned fuel boxes sitting out front highly discounted. I got one of the aluminum diamond plated 55 gallon tanks for about half price. The drain plug had a small leak so I put a street elbow with a plug and sealed the heck out of it. Never leaks a drop. It has hooks on top to be lifted with a loader. I also built my own pallet out of treated lumber and bolted it to it so I can use my bobcat forks on it. When it is in the shop I keep it on a 24x30 inch dolley so I can roll it around wherever I need to fill up.
 

Jogeephus

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Why not get some used Roundup drums. They are free and plentiful. You can then buy a hand pump and attach a hose to it to pump it right in your tractor or jug. I've unloaded them from the truck before using a 4-wheeler ramp. Just roll the drum down the ramp. If you got access to a ramp then the total cost would be around $30.
 

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