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Flies

A

Anonymous

Guest
Does anyone have any great remedies for keeping flies off your herd? With warm weather returning to the Southeast they are starting to be an annoyance already. Thanks!



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A

Anonymous

Guest
Fly control, there is no real prevention, has to be addressed as a multi-facteted problem. Except horseflys, I don't think there really is anything truly effective against them that is practical. Sanitation particularly in a drylot or in concentration areas is the first issue. Keep it dry, spread out the manure so it can dry out, no water bog spots, break the pats down so they can dry more effectively. Sparys, wipes, rubs with an insecticide, we use a hanging mop type of deal with diesel and permethrin in a spot that the cattle have to pass through to get to or return from water. Several years ago we started using minerals with Rabon, a larvacide, that has proven effective. The catch with that is that you have to start using it before the flys get going very much. You won't see a decrease in flys, you just won't notice that there are many of them. Last but not least, wild turkeys, or in areas without them, guineas or free range chickens. They will help to break down the pats and will eat the larva, larvacides aren't really 100% effective. Simple isn't it? You could probably throw in insecticide ear tags although we've never found them particularly effective or worth the cost or hassle. The thing to remember is that you have to remove the old tag whne the package label says they're no longer effective. There is some research that claims that eaving them in past their effective date contributes to flies that are resistant to them.

dun

> Does anyone have any great
> remedies for keeping flies off
> your herd? With warm weather
> returning to the Southeast they
> are starting to be an annoyance
> already. Thanks!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
One more thing that helps out is fly traps. For every fly killed in the spring , five thousand you won't have to deal with later. ( agreeing with what Dun said ) I use the one gallon plastec jug size. You can make your own if you have the time. The bait is easy to make with yeast and a little ammonium carbonate in water left to ferment. Good luck!
> Rod

> Fly control, there is no real
> prevention, has to be addressed as
> a multi-facteted problem. Except
> horseflys, I don't think there
> really is anything truly effective
> against them that is practical.
> Sanitation particularly in a
> drylot or in concentration areas
> is the first issue. Keep it dry,
> spread out the manure so it can
> dry out, no water bog spots, break
> the pats down so they can dry more
> effectively. Sparys, wipes, rubs
> with an insecticide, we use a
> hanging mop type of deal with
> diesel and permethrin in a spot
> that the cattle have to pass
> through to get to or return from
> water. Several years ago we
> started using minerals with Rabon,
> a larvacide, that has proven
> effective. The catch with that is
> that you have to start using it
> before the flys get going very
> much. You won't see a decrease in
> flys, you just won't notice that
> there are many of them. Last but
> not least, wild turkeys, or in
> areas without them, guineas or
> free range chickens. They will
> help to break down the pats and
> will eat the larva, larvacides
> aren't really 100% effective.
> Simple isn't it? You could
> probably throw in insecticide ear
> tags although we've never found
> them particularly effective or
> worth the cost or hassle. The
> thing to remember is that you have
> to remove the old tag whne the
> package label says they're no
> longer effective. There is some
> research that claims that eaving
> them in past their effective date
> contributes to flies that are
> resistant to them.

> dun
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
One thing that sounds really strange but really does work is imitation vanilla flavoring in the drinking water.

I started using for my rabbits -- totally eliminates flies in the rabbitry. Then decided to see if it would work with the other animals (with vet's approval, of course). Didn't work at all with poultry, but worked quite well with the cattle.

Mixed into the water at the rate of 1 tsp per gallon (I think it's like 1/4 cup per 100 gallons, I'd have to refigure it) it changes the manure just enough to make it unattractive to flies.

Probably wouldn't be feasible with a large number of animals, but with just a few on a small acreage, it works real well. Oh, and it has to be imitation vanilla -- real vanilla extract doesn't work nearly as well.

Ann B

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A

Anonymous

Guest
I use the Cylence pour On,it is quick and effective and improves gains, as it prevents biting/sucking flies which reduce gains, also treats Lyce! Depending on the severity of flies I use it every 5-8 weeks,

Good Luck

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A

Anonymous

Guest
will this prevent horse flies? or is there anything that can?

we have had to pull the bulls from pasture because of horse flies

regards Art
> I use the Cylence pour On,it is
> quick and effective and improves
> gains, as it prevents
> biting/sucking flies which reduce
> gains, also treats Lyce! Depending
> on the severity of flies I use it
> every 5-8 weeks,

> Good Luck



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A

Anonymous

Guest
How exactly do you make one of those there fly traps?

One more thing that helps out is
> fly traps. For every fly killed in
> the spring , five thousand you
> won't have to deal with later. (
> agreeing with what Dun said ) I
> use the one gallon plastec jug
> size. You can make your own if you
> have the time. The bait is easy to
> make with yeast and a little
> ammonium carbonate in water left
> to ferment. Good luck!



[email protected]
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Here in Georgia the last two summers were terrible because of the flys. I would spray by hand every 5 days, and never did get control: used backrubbers, changed the type of insectacide, no effect, etc.

This year we are trying Moorman's IGR high mag mineral. IGR is insect growth regulator. Not a larvacide like Rabon, but prevents the larva from going on to the next stages towards becoming a flying fly. I am amazed that we have hardly any flys this year - so far. By this time last year we were in "fly heaven."

Yes, you need to start feeding it way before the season starts. Yes it is expensive like $30 per 50 lb bag, a little over twice that of plain high mag minerals. For me, it is worth it - less work, cows are content and I'm a happy farmer.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
> How exactly do you make one of
> those there fly traps?

I did make a couple and they work just as good as the store bought and allot cheaper. I took a one gallon plastic mayonnaise jar and drilled a hole in the lid for a piece 1 1/2" PVC to stick up about 4" with a cap on the end. I cut slots in the top for the flies to enter and bolted a plastic bowl on top for a hood. fill it 1/3 full of liquid bait and hang it from the bolt in the top. Make sure you paint the inside of the top piece black so the flies don't see day light looking up. Try to keep them out of the breeze and in the sun. I just got two semi clear five gallon buckets to make traps out of. I'm declaring war this year. Sorry so long getting back to you. Good trapping!

> Rod
 

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