Feeding Cows this winter

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Anonymous

I would like to hear some new thoughts on feeding my 50 beef cows over winter. I have been feeding hay for last 2 years, and I have not been pleased with the quality I have purchased. I have used a little corn, but dont know how to control it. When I feed in bunks larger healthy cows get more than small cows. I supplement with Pro lix and salt and mag blocks. How many lbs of corn do I give each cow? Is it different for corn gluten? I am feeding for 150 days, and am looking to do things right and save money. This is a new farm to me, and I am looking foward to cutting my own hay. I am in Ky.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> I would like to hear some new
> thoughts on feeding my 50 beef
> cows over winter. I have been
> feeding hay for last 2 years, and
> I have not been pleased with the
> quality I have purchased. I have
> used a little corn, but dont know
> how to control it. When I feed in
> bunks larger healthy cows get more
> than small cows. I supplement with
> Pro lix and salt and mag blocks.
> How many lbs of corn do I give
> each cow? Is it different for corn
> gluten? I am feeding for 150 days,
> and am looking to do things right
> and save money. This is a new farm
> to me, and I am looking foward to
> cutting my own hay. I am in Ky.

First of all I would only buy tested hay or have it tested so I would know the protein and feed value or Total Disgestable Nutrients (TND). Also I would consult my University Extension and get information on cattle feed requrments in KY. As far as the corn is concerned, plan to feed 1 1/2 to 2% of the cows average body weight and use cracked corn. I mix mine with a roughtage like cotton seed or soybean hulls. Good hay can be fed at the rate of about 35 lbs per day for each dry cow (1150 -1250 lbs). Good hay would have protein of about 10% or higher. The corn would provide the energy. If your hay is less than 8% protein you should feed a protein suppliment free choice. If your smaller cows are being edged out by the larger ones you might try seperating by size during the feed period and offer more feed bunks. Good Luck



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OP
A

Anonymous

> First of all I would only buy
> tested hay or have it tested so I
> would know the protein and feed
> value or Total Disgestable
> Nutrients (TND). Also I would
> consult my University Extension
> and get information on cattle feed
> requrments in KY. As far as the
> corn is concerned, plan to feed 1
> 1/2 to 2% of the cows average body
> weight and use cracked corn. I mix
> mine with a roughtage like cotton
> seed or soybean hulls. Good hay
> can be fed at the rate of about 35
> lbs per day for each dry cow (1150
> -1250 lbs). Good hay would have
> protein of about 10% or higher.
> The corn would provide the energy.
> If your hay is less than 8%
> protein you should feed a protein
> suppliment free choice. If your
> smaller cows are being edged out
> by the larger ones you might try
> seperating by size during the feed
> period and offer more feed bunks.
> Good Luck

Watch those typos Sillco, 2 % of a cows weight would be 20 pounds of corn on a 1000 pound cow, too expensive and too much energy. You would only feed this kind of corn if you had no hay or hay with 4% protien and it was very cold and the cow was milking. This is an amount of corn fed to a grain fed steer for slaughter.

Cows need enough protien and energy to gain half a pound a day or just maintain weight if they are fat enough. Typically 10% protien is sufficient. If your hay is quite coarse and the cows can't physically eat enough then 2-4 pounds of corn is a cheap suppliment. Gluten is high in protien and lower in energy so it is used for a protien boost only if you are feeding very low protien forages, or in calves where they have only so much room to eat (belly room).

Soybean meal is usually a cheaper protien source, but the market varies so compare prices by pound of nutrient, either protien or energy.

Poor hay, 3 pounds of corn and a pound of soy makes a nice ration cows will bloom on.

Jason
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> Watch those typos Sillco, 2 % of a
> cows weight would be 20 pounds of
> corn on a 1000 pound cow, too
> expensive and too much energy. You
> would only feed this kind of corn
> if you had no hay or hay with 4%
> protien and it was very cold and
> the cow was milking. This is an
> amount of corn fed to a grain fed
> steer for slaughter.

> Cows need enough protien and
> energy to gain half a pound a day
> or just maintain weight if they
> are fat enough. Typically 10%
> protien is sufficient. If your hay
> is quite coarse and the cows can't
> physically eat enough then 2-4
> pounds of corn is a cheap
> suppliment. Gluten is high in
> protien and lower in energy so it
> is used for a protien boost only
> if you are feeding very low
> protien forages, or in calves
> where they have only so much room
> to eat (belly room).

> Soybean meal is usually a cheaper
> protien source, but the market
> varies so compare prices by pound
> of nutrient, either protien or
> energy.

> Poor hay, 3 pounds of corn and a
> pound of soy makes a nice ration
> cows will bloom on.

> Jason

Jason you are right. I guess I failed to notice if they were being fed for finish or in confindment. 2% would be too much protein to a pastured cow.



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Anonymous

I live in Iowa, and one way we stretch our hay supply is by grinding it. We take a round bale of quality hay and grind it with 2 cornstalk bales. If you don't have cornstalks, you can use poor quality hay and hire a tub grinder to mix it together. We feed this the 4 months prior to calving, this is also fed with 5 lbs. corn and protein tubs. It really stretch's out a low hay supply and also brings down the cost of the quality hay. We feed 30 lbs. of hay a day + grain. We also found out that to let all the cows get some grain, take a bucket of grain and make 4-5 small piles on the ground and the cows will have to work to get it picked up, but they all get some, they clean the ground perfect.
 

eric

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yep, that's what I have found works best, making a few smaller piles. the calves never had a chance when we put in all in one tub, and the yrlings always got pushed away also. Now we put 2-3 piles 50-60 ft away for the calves.
 

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