Continuous fence post

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That's what we were thinking.
Would heavy 3" work for ends,corners and gate post?
What is a good depth to drive the post?
What about driving them vs concrete?
 
We used 6" for the corners and gate posts, with overheads on the gates. The other posts are all 2 7/8 drill pipe.

I don't know how your ground is on that side of the state, but in SW MO the ground is so hard and rocky, if you drive a post in it's generally solid enough without concrete.

I drove them all 2-4 ft.
 
Atimm693":2gonxuqb said:
We used 6" for the corners and gate posts, with overheads on the gates. The other posts are all 2 7/8 drill pipe.

I don't know how your ground is on that side of the state, but in SW MO the ground is so hard and rocky, if you drive a post in it's generally solid enough without concrete.

I drove them all 2-4 ft.

What did you use to drive them? Hydraulic post driver or by hand?
Asking as we are in south central MO and it can be very rocky in places.
 
Hunter":2x4c7cc8 said:
Atimm693":2x4c7cc8 said:
We used 6" for the corners and gate posts, with overheads on the gates. The other posts are all 2 7/8 drill pipe.

I don't know how your ground is on that side of the state, but in SW MO the ground is so hard and rocky, if you drive a post in it's generally solid enough without concrete.

I drove them all 2-4 ft.

What did you use to drive them? Hydraulic post driver or by hand?
Asking as we are in south central MO and it can be very rocky in places.

Worksaver hydraulic pounder.

There were less than a dozen out of several hundred that I had to pull and reset because they wouldn't go.

They will always find a path, but its usually not straight. We would pound a section and go back with a level and skid loader then push them straight.
 
Atimm693":39k7l1y3 said:
Hunter":39k7l1y3 said:
Atimm693":39k7l1y3 said:
We used 6" for the corners and gate posts, with overheads on the gates. The other posts are all 2 7/8 drill pipe.

I don't know how your ground is on that side of the state, but in SW MO the ground is so hard and rocky, if you drive a post in it's generally solid enough without concrete.

I drove them all 2-4 ft.

What did you use to drive them? Hydraulic post driver or by hand?
Asking as we are in south central MO and it can be very rocky in places.

Worksaver hydraulic pounder.

There were less than a dozen out of several hundred that I had to pull and reset because they wouldn't go.

They will always find a path, but its usually not straight. We would pound a section and go back with a level and skid loader then push them straight.
You folks obviously dont ;have the glade rock issues that we have in the ozarks. A lot of places you can;t penetrate more then a couple of inches.
 
dun":2qsag1i5 said:
Atimm693":2qsag1i5 said:
Hunter":2qsag1i5 said:
What did you use to drive them? Hydraulic post driver or by hand?
Asking as we are in south central MO and it can be very rocky in places.

Worksaver hydraulic pounder.

There were less than a dozen out of several hundred that I had to pull and reset because they wouldn't go.

They will always find a path, but its usually not straight. We would pound a section and go back with a level and skid loader then push them straight.
You folks obviously dont ;have the glade rock issues that we have in the ozarks. A lot of places you can;t penetrate more then a couple of inches.

I'm in the Southeast corner of St. Clair county.

It's plenty rocky here, but I've never dug a hole down south to compare.

Sometimes I have trouble getting a plastic step-in post to go.
 
Atimm693":wmruqn49 said:
I'm in the Southeast corner of St. Clair county.

It's plenty rocky here, but I've never dug a hole down south to compare.

Sometimes I have trouble getting a plastic step-in post to go.
Here it isn;t rocky as much as it is one solid sheet of limestone. There are a few places where it is broken up enough or has enough rock/clay/soil over it that you can drive a post (or dig a hole) but those are few and far between.
 
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