Clarification

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lavacarancher

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Folks, I've been reading about the use of "high tensile" wire on here for a few years and I thought I knew what you were talking about but I just read a few posts that I now question the definition of "high tensile". I'm not trying to be a school teacher here but in my day job the term "high tensile" deals with the strength of materials. Tensile strength of a bolt, for example, may be several thousand pounds before the metal seperates or fails. Same specification could be used on barbed wire fencing material. Gaucho wire is "high tensile strength" wire meaning it can be stressed a LOT before breaking.

I see folks using the term related to what I think is electric fences. In this case the term should be "high tension", not high tensile? Is this correct? If not, what do you mean when using the term high tensile as it relates to an electric fence? I use the poly line interwoven with stainless steel strands for my electric fencing and it certainly isn't "high tensile" wire.

Again, not trying to be a smart a$$ or school teacher, just trying to understand what your talking about.

Thanks,
 

backhoeboogie

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You are exactly correct. But you cannot get too technical in terms used in this forum. The wire they are referring to on this board does not compare to the tensile strenth of say Grade 8 bolts. Metalurgical engineers would laugh at that definition of high tensil wire. But engineers would also laugh at terms like, 2 3/8 inch pipe - it is 2 inch pipe - jsut like 1/2 inch threade pipe measures 7/8 outside diameter.

The old ground wire used by power companies in overhead transmission lines is high tensile. It will be more akin to high grade bolts. That is the only wire I know of that is truly high tensile strength. If you can find the three strand wire with two steel and only one copper strand, you have something. You would be lucky to get one click on it with a golden rod on a 1000 foot run.

What everyone is referring to as "high tensile" in this forum is what is sold by that definition at the farm supply stores. It is a higher grade wire than commercial grade barbed wire. It does not have the metal composition of things like Grade 80 chain etc.
 

dun

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It isn;t just the farm stores. It's the manufacuterer, installers, people writing specs for fencing, etc. High tension would indicate that it's stretched tight, it doesn;t have to be. Could be fairly loose. But the breaking strength of the wire is high enough, 1500-1800 lbs with a PSI rating of 140,000 to 180,000, that it pretty well qualifys when compared to standard (soft) wire.
 

hillsdown

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I say high tensile because that is what the label says on the wire it when I buy it. That is how the store refers to it as when I inquire about it, as well as anyone I speak to about it on here or in the real world.. so if it is wrong I apologize.

Now if we are talking about clarification on things here is one...It bugs the [email protected] out of me when someone refers to a cows teats as tits...This word does not even exist in human anatomy and it would be referred to as nipple. Udder and teats .......
 

dun

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hillsdown":20p430hq said:
I say high tensile because that is what the label says on the wire it when I buy it. That is how the store refers to it as when I inquire about it, as well as anyone I speak to about it on here or in the real world.. so if it is wrong I apologize.

Now if we are talking about clarification on things here is one...It bugs the [email protected] out of me when someone refers to a cows teats as tits...This word does not even exist in human anatomy and it would be referred to as nipple. Udder and teats .......
Heard someone refer to a third calf heifer the other day. Just shock my head and walked away
 

ga. prime

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High tensile 12.5 gauge is what I use. 180,000 psi breaking strength. I think this would fit anybody's definition of high tensile. You can stretch it till you break the tensioner, but you won't break the wire. Or, you can leave it with a good bit less tension than it takes to break the tensioner and put posts about 20 steps apart with no sag. If you drive your tractor through it, something else in the line will break before the wire does.
 

hillsdown

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dun":2c0n44h7 said:
hillsdown":2c0n44h7 said:
I say high tensile because that is what the label says on the wire it when I buy it. That is how the store refers to it as when I inquire about it, as well as anyone I speak to about it on here or in the real world.. so if it is wrong I apologize.

Now if we are talking about clarification on things here is one...It bugs the [email protected] out of me when someone refers to a cows teats as tits...This word does not even exist in human anatomy and it would be referred to as nipple. Udder and teats .......
Heard someone refer to a third calf heifer the other day. Just shock my head and walked away

Well you know Dun, some gals stay young looking no matter how many kids they have had.. :p
 
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lavacarancher

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Thanks for all the answers. I didn't realize the term was used by the manufacturers of the wire, etc.

When I suggested the term would/should be "high tension" when used in electric fencing terms I meant high voltage (see, even the confused can get more confused :D) Then I read a post that talked about using three "high tensile" wires with tensioning, stretching, etc in the context of an electric fence then I started to wonder what the heck was being discussed, high tensile strength wire without barbs and electricity hooked up to it?

OK, I understand. High tensile means strong wire when talking about normal barbed wire fencing material. It also may mean any wire (or cable) used for electric fencing. Got it! :D

Thanks,
 

ga. prime

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lavacarancher":3l6ut50i said:
It also may mean any wire (or cable) used for electric fencing. Got it! :D

Thanks,
:D Wrong. Not all wire used for electric fencing is high tensile.
 

backhoeboogie

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dun":1r0mv53m said:
Heard someone refer to a third calf heifer the other day. Just shock my head and walked away

I've been saying that to humor folks. 4th and 5th calf heifer too. My herd is young - all heifers. The oldest gal in there is 6 years old. Not a cow in the bunch. :D :D :D
 
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lavacarancher

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ga. prime":3hljya2y said:
lavacarancher":3hljya2y said:
It also may mean any wire (or cable) used for electric fencing. Got it! :D

Thanks,
:D Wrong. Not all wire used for electric fencing is high tensile.

Yes, you're right. I mistakenly bought some aluminum wire for stringing an electric fence one time. In that case it would have been low tensile strength, high tension (high voltage/high energy) wire.
 

Jim62

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So, is the 14 guage galvanized steel wire I use for electric fences high-tensile or high-tension? Whichever, it works pretty well for electric fence, and is pretty easy to deal with.

My only experience with "high-tensile" was not pleasant. The roll was neatly wrapped and secured when I bought it. Unfortunately, when it was unsecured, about a hundred feet of it came off the roll like a giant slinky gone mad.

So if it says high-tensile strength, I walk away from it. Can't even imagine what the result would be if you had about 1000' unrolled and it somehow got away from you.
 

TexasBred

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hillsdown":16fel5tm said:
I say high tensile because that is what the label says on the wire it when I buy it. That is how the store refers to it as when I inquire about it, as well as anyone I speak to about it on here or in the real world.. so if it is wrong I apologize.

Now if we are talking about clarification on things here is one...It bugs the [email protected] out of me when someone refers to a cows teats as tits...This word does not even exist in human anatomy and it would be referred to as nipple. Udder and teats .......

Guess it's another geographic thing. Around here 99% of the time folks will say "Bag" instead of udder and "tits" for teats. Can't remember the last time I heard someone say "Teat". I guess if we can call testicles "Nuts" we can call teats "tits".

From Webster's Dictionary:

1tit
Pronunciation:\ˈtit\
Function:noun
Etymology:Middle English, from Old English — more at teat
Date:before 12th century
1: teat
2usually vulgar : breast —usually used in plural
 

john250

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Jim62":2gp3v9dn said:
So, is the 14 guage galvanized steel wire I use for electric fences high-tensile or high-tension? Whichever, it works pretty well for electric fence, and is pretty easy to deal with.

I think your talking about soft wire. It works well for many applications.

Jim62":2gp3v9dn said:
My only experience with "high-tensile" was not pleasant. The roll was neatly wrapped and secured when I bought it. Unfortunately, when it was unsecured, about a hundred feet of it came off the roll like a giant slinky gone mad.

So if it says high-tensile strength, I walk away from it. Can't even imagine what the result would be if you had about 1000' unrolled and it somehow got away from you.

Two words-Spinning Jenny. :D
 

dun

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john250":2jmpflvh said:
Jim62":2jmpflvh said:
So, is the 14 guage galvanized steel wire I use for electric fences high-tensile or high-tension? Whichever, it works pretty well for electric fence, and is pretty easy to deal with.

I think your talking about soft wire. It works well for many applications.

Jim62":2jmpflvh said:
My only experience with "high-tensile" was not pleasant. The roll was neatly wrapped and secured when I bought it. Unfortunately, when it was unsecured, about a hundred feet of it came off the roll like a giant slinky gone mad.

So if it says high-tensile strength, I walk away from it. Can't even imagine what the result would be if you had about 1000' unrolled and it somehow got away from you.

Two words-Spinning Jenny. :D

Just for emphasis
 

ga. prime

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TexasBred":154gp0e3 said:
hillsdown":154gp0e3 said:
Now if we are talking about clarification on things here is one...It bugs the [email protected] out of me when someone refers to a cows teats as tits...This word does not even exist in human anatomy and it would be referred to as nipple. Udder and teats .......

Guess it's another geographic thing. Around here 99% of the time folks will say "Bag" instead of udder and "tits" for teats. Can't remember the last time I heard someone say "Teat". I guess if we can call testicles "Nuts" we can call teats "tits".

From Webster's Dictionary:

1tit
Pronunciation:\ˈtit\
Function:noun
Etymology:Middle English, from Old English — more at teat
Date:before 12th century
1: teat
2usually vulgar : breast —usually used in plural
That's right Tex, it's a colloquialism.

From Webster's:

colloquialism
One entry found.
Main Entry: col·lo·qui·al·ism
Pronunciation: \-ˈlō-kwē-ə-ˌli-zəm\
Function: noun
Date: 1810
1 a: a colloquial expression b: a local or regional dialect expression
 

TexasBred

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ga.....glad you showed me what that big a$$ word meant. Not use to that many syllables in one word. To me those big words are useless as "teats on a boar hog"..(something about that just don't sound right. :lol:
 

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