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Anonymous

Was just wondering how long the original poster had been in the cattle business and how many head they had. Not trying to start any fussing but was simply just wondering? thanks
 
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Anonymous

Hey! Good point! I grew up on a black angus and hereford operation in North Central Texas. Got my feet wet there. Dad went for quality animals, a good servicable bull, and he won some ribbons on them. Also, made a little money on that part of his business activities and we occasionally ate one.

Years later, I decided to get back into cattle and didn't want all the hassles of competing with the feed yards, slaughter houses, commercial operations, etc. Decided to do specialty cattle, registered Texas Longhorns. Been back in this phase about 2 years. SLOWLY increasing herd...have 2 bulls with different lineages, frozen semen from top quality bulls, about 6 real good brood cows, and heifers, plus several calves on the ground and several more expected this year. By the end of the year we'll probably have around 25 or so real good animals. Using one of our yearling bulls for leasing out for out-crossing to commercial breeder's 1st calf heifers. We're chasing confirmation and body and horn length plus variety of color patterns.

Bottom-line: We are breeders and are not chasing $$ at the sale barn or other commercial type ventures. Our foundation stock will probably breed and calve into their late teens and very early 20's. Excess stock that doesn't fit our program will be sold at the most profitable outlet.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> Hey! Good point! I grew up on a
> black angus and hereford operation
> in North Central Texas. Got my
> feet wet there. Dad went for
> quality animals, a good servicable
> bull, and he won some ribbons on
> them. Also, made a little money on
> that part of his business
> activities and we occasionally ate
> one.

> Years later, I decided to get back
> into cattle and didn't want all
> the hassles of competing with the
> feed yards, slaughter houses,
> commercial operations, etc.
> Decided to do specialty cattle,
> registered Texas Longhorns. Been
> back in this phase about 2 years.
> SLOWLY increasing herd...have 2
> bulls with different lineages,
> frozen semen from top quality
> bulls, about 6 real good brood
> cows, and heifers, plus several
> calves on the ground and several
> more expected this year. By the
> end of the year we'll probably
> have around 25 or so real good
> animals. Using one of our yearling
> bulls for leasing out for
> out-crossing to commercial
> breeder's 1st calf heifers. We're
> chasing confirmation and body and
> horn length plus variety of color
> patterns.

> Bottom-line: We are breeders and
> are not chasing $$ at the sale
> barn or other commercial type
> ventures. Our foundation stock
> will probably breed and calve into
> their late teens and very early
> 20's. Excess stock that doesn't
> fit our program will be sold at
> the most profitable outlet.

THANKS--JUST BEING NOSEY HAVE FOOLED WITH LONG-HORN AND CORRIENTE CROSSES FOR YEARS. REG. CORRIENTE BULL ON LONGHORN COMMERIICAL CATTLE. ALSO HAVE SMALL HERD OF ANGUS (25). PERCENTAGE WISE LONGHORN CROSSES MAKE MORE PROFIT, BECAUSE OF THEIR LOWER COST AND UPKEEP.
 
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Anonymous

Ok to be nosey! That's how we all learn more too. So many different breeders, ranchers with different programs ranging from someone wanting a pasture ornament or two to large operation running hundreds of head. Appreciate hearing from someone who has tried and had success with Longhorn crosses. Lot of other people out there that aren't into this.

If we're happy with what we're doing than that's what life is all about....

Some cattlemen are running such a tight ship and scientifically growing, weight-gaining, finishing their stock to make a few bucks per head....wonder if the're having any fun or get to smell the roses along the way.

If you're doing one of the English breeds or other breeds where they all look alike, to me, that's a little boring, even if you're making a dollar or two. With the Texas Longhorns, every new calf is an exciting event...never know what color or pattern it will be (there are some exceptions though). With the Longhorns, it is a darn rare event to lose a calf or have to pull one. And, very few (if any) serious problems with predators...they are survivors and know how to protect themselves and their calves. Bill.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Just for the record, those cattlemen who “are running such a tight ship and scientifically growing, weight-graining, finishing their stock to make a few bucks per head” are having just as much fun as you are. But, in addition to enjoying my cattle, I expect them to be profitable. And they are. I’m probably as pleased and excited when one of my bulls gains 5.5 lbs per day on test or ultrasounds a 6 reading as you are when you get a set of especially long horns on an animal. Of course, I’m pleased because that bull can go to work for a cattle producer and help him improve his bottom line by siring calves that will gain and grade and I don’t see any practical use for horns at all. Even though all the calves born on my place are black, they don’t “look alike” any more than all Indians or Japanese do. IMHO, a red and white newborn Hereford calf, clean and shiny, is one of nature’s most beautiful sights and they don't have spots. In my area, 10-12 years ago we saw a lot of Longhorns being used on first calf heifers. Don’t see that anymore. People have learned to use EPDs to select low birthweight bulls to use on those heifers and have a more marketable calf at weaning. As for predators, I’ve seen weaned heifers chase coyotes and strange dogs out of pastures. Cows don’t necessarily need horns to protect themselves or their calves. When my neighbor got beat up by a cow a few years ago, it was her feet that did the damage, not her horns.
 
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Anonymous

Dun and Frankie and others on the board...no problem with your comments and they all make sense. Without shooting myself in the foot, I think ALL of us are proud of what we are doing and want to promote our breeds, programs, and all as much as we can. If just one person likes what we as individual cattle people are doing and maybe even buys something from us or becomes our friend...well, it's a win-win deal.

I think it goes without saying that any livestock activity or program that is out of the mainstream of America (specialty nitch markets) is just that...a nitch thing. This is not to say that any producer in a popular market or nitch market program is doing it for snob appeal: they are doing it because they want to do it and they enjoy doing it. I think we all occasionally emphasize the "great traits" of the breeds we are dealing with...that's just human nature...we are all proud of our program and breeds in which we are dealing.

In my part of the country, the big thing is Angus (and popular cross-breeds of same) and Quarter Horses. I'm sure some of the locals here think we are nuts raising Texas Longhorns and Gaited Horses. However, it makes for some interesting conversations at the least! We have had a number of curiosity seekers on what we are doing...and, a small percentage of these people have expressed interest in what we are raising and selling. And, it is not uncommon for customers seeking these type of animals from us or others traveling hundreds of miles to purchase one or more of the animals for their breeding program. Our personal target market area is probably a radius of 500-800 miles from our location.

So...we all enjoy what we are doing or otherwise we wouldn't be doing it...right? Peace and prosperity to everyone!

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> Dun and Frankie and others on the
> board...no problem with your
> comments and they all make sense.
> Without shooting myself in the
> foot, I think ALL of us are proud
> of what we are doing and want to
> promote our breeds, programs, and
> all as much as we can. If just one
> person likes what we as individual
> cattle people are doing and maybe
> even buys something from us or
> becomes our friend...well, it's a
> win-win deal.

> I think it goes without saying
> that any livestock activity or
> program that is out of the
> mainstream of America (specialty
> nitch markets) is just that...a
> nitch thing. This is not to say
> that any producer in a popular
> market or nitch market program is
> doing it for snob appeal: they are
> doing it because they want to do
> it and they enjoy doing it. I
> think we all occasionally
> emphasize the "great
> traits" of the breeds we are
> dealing with...that's just human
> nature...we are all proud of our
> program and breeds in which we are
> dealing.

> In my part of the country, the big
> thing is Angus (and popular
> cross-breeds of same) and Quarter
> Horses. I'm sure some of the
> locals here think we are nuts
> raising Texas Longhorns and Gaited
> Horses. However, it makes for some
> interesting conversations at the
> least! We have had a number of
> curiosity seekers on what we are
> doing...and, a small percentage of
> these people have expressed
> interest in what we are raising
> and selling. And, it is not
> uncommon for customers seeking
> these type of animals from us or
> others traveling hundreds of miles
> to purchase one or more of the
> animals for their breeding
> program. Our personal target
> market area is probably a radius
> of 500-800 miles from our
> location.

> So...we all enjoy what we are
> doing or otherwise we wouldn't be
> doing it...right? Peace and
> prosperity to everyone!

You said not many longhorn crosses in your area.Where you located? The local sale here usually run 3 or 4 here a week, Usually can pick up a helfier for 40 to 60 $ per hundred wt. A lot of guys buy up burnt out roping steers and do weight gain on rye grass in the winter months. Easy keepers.
 
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Anonymous

We're in Texas Panhandle right on US Hwy 83--about 1/2 way between US 287 and I-40.

Irrespective of breeds, in our region heifers have selling for between about $70 and $90 and steers between about $90 and $110. per cwt at sale barns. Cow/calf pairs between about $600 to $800 for good average stock. Bulls in $45 to $60 range per cwt. Canners, cutters, culls in $35 to $50 range. Seems to be mostly Angus, Hereford, Baldy, Brahma and related crosses around here. Some large Holstein daries within 150 mile radius fo here. Horses are mostly Quarter, Paint, with occasional Thorobred.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> We're in Texas Panhandle right on
> US Hwy 83--about 1/2 way between
> US 287 and I-40.

> Irrespective of breeds, in our
> region heifers have selling for
> between about $70 and $90 and
> steers between about $90 and $110.
> per cwt at sale barns. Cow/calf
> pairs between about $600 to $800
> for good average stock. Bulls in
> $45 to $60 range per cwt. Canners,
> cutters, culls in $35 to $50
> range. Seems to be mostly Angus,
> Hereford, Baldy, Brahma and
> related crosses around here. Some
> large Holstein daries within 150
> mile radius fo here. Horses are
> mostly Quarter, Paint, with
> occasional Thorobred.

ANYTHING THAT LOOKS LIKE IT MIGHT BE LONGHORN CROSS GETS DOCKED HEAVY OVER HERE. 450 ANGUS OR ANGUS CROSS STEER 90 TO 135 PER 1OO WT. SAME SIZE BUT LOOKS LIKE A LONGHORN CROSS 35 TO 55 PER HUNDRED WT. longhorn pair $450 to $550 commerical angus pair $650 to $900. Picked up some nice breed longhorn heilfers for $220 each. Bought 4 commerical breed angus heilfers $650 each. Simple math the LH will bring you more return on your invest by %. Good talking to you enjoy the LHS.
 
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Anonymous

Were are you located MSB? We've only sold one cow and bull calf at a sale barn in another place before we moved here--she was a fence crasher--so far my only purchase mistake--knock on wood...lol. After couple of wranglers corralled her across 2 neighbor's pastures and roped her, I only lost about $200 on the deal after having the 2 for about a month.

Know it's true about docking stuff with horns at sale barns. We've even had one or two Longhorn "breeders" in neighboring counties try to sell us some of their stock (to get better price?) but we declined since their stock weren't registered--we only purchase registered stock for breeding.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

> Were are you located MSB? We've
> only sold one cow and bull calf at
> a sale barn in another place
> before we moved here--she was a
> fence crasher--so far my only
> purchase mistake--knock on
> wood...lol. After couple of
> wranglers corralled her across 2
> neighbor's pastures and roped her,
> I only lost about $200 on the deal
> after having the 2 for about a
> month.

> Know it's true about docking stuff
> with horns at sale barns. We've
> even had one or two Longhorn
> "breeders" in
> neighboring counties try to sell
> us some of their stock (to get
> better price?) but we declined
> since their stock weren't
> registered--we only purchase
> registered stock for breeding.

LOCATED IN MS. PAID $400 FOR REG. 14 MONTH OLD BULL FROM INDIV. BOUGHT A COUPLE OF PAPERED LH CATTLE THRU LOCAL SALE BARN FOR AROUND $275. LH CATTLE JUST ARE FLAT CHEAP HERE. THE MOST EXPENSIVE ARE ROPING STOCK. THEY BRING FROM $300 TO $450 PER HEAD. IF IT LOOKS LIKE A LH, COLORED LIKE A LH A GOOD COMMERICAL TYPE COW 3 TO 5 YEARS OLD MIGHT BRING $350 TO 400 TOPS. REG TO A FEW SPECIALLY GROWERS $800 NOT REALLY A DEMAND FOR REG LH STUFF IN OUR AREA BUT YOU CAN SELL ALL THE ROPING STOCK YOU CAN GROW AND MAKE A DECENT PROFIT. AT ONE TIME WE HAD 65 MAMA LH COMMERICAL COWS RUNNING WITH CORRITTE AND LH BULLS, BUT WE HAD BOUGHT MOST OF THEM WHEN THEY WERE CHEAP AND THE PRICE WENT UP SO WE CUT BACK AFTER 2 CALVING SEASONS MADE A FAIR PROFIT (SOMETIMES A PERSON LUCKS OUT LOL). BEST OF LUCK WITH YOUR HERD.
 
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Anonymous

If I understand your numbers, each 4cwt calve you sell out of your $220 heifers is worth about $240 less. The cow may be an easy keeper but she would starve me to death. > BE LONGHORN CROSS GETS DOCKED
> HEAVY OVER HERE. 450 ANGUS OR
> ANGUS CROSS STEER 90 TO 135 PER
> 1OO WT. SAME SIZE BUT LOOKS LIKE A
> LONGHORN CROSS 35 TO 55 PER
> HUNDRED WT. longhorn pair $450 to
> $550 commerical angus pair $650 to
> $900. Picked up some nice breed
> longhorn heilfers for $220 each.
> Bought 4 commerical breed angus
> heilfers $650 each. Simple math
> the LH will bring you more return
> on your invest by %. Good talking
> to you enjoy the LHS.
 

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