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southalberta

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I would like someone explain how a Reg. Angus bull can produce horns and spots. Are the LH genes different from known beef genes?
First of all black is 99.9999% dominant over red.
However certain alleles (specific genes) effect coloration and horns.
Horns are a “wild” gene cannot recall exact terminology linked back to Spanish cattle believe pajuna and tudenca in longhorns. Also some Indica breeds

coloration is actually interesting. With experience and certain Longhorn specific genetic markers you can tell what they will throw with X Bull most of the time.

Anything Black especially you have the odd anomaly with colouring. I believe this is due to changes in the breed from what it was to what it is. Meaning black angus was originally quite small look darn near like what we call a dexter currently now they have 6-800 pound more mature weight so there are obviously Foreign genes in there.

I believe problem breeding a black angus which in my opinion is now genetically a mutt to old longhorn genetics is same as breeding a grade quarter horse to an Arabian and registering a paint. Red cattle have older dominant genes as they largely are not interfered with as much.

this coming breeding year I am going red and every single animal is getting a full DNA test. The red bulls are coming from reputable breeders and 18 are actually AI
 

Caustic Burno

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African horn gene is dominant gene.

 
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Weaning size was slightly heavier at roughly 175 day average they weighed 445#s. Knocked the color off almost all the calves. They were a very consistent group. Nice frames on them. This was the first group of char calves I’ve had . I haven’t fed any out. This is my first post and I don’t know if it went in the right spot. I’d like to post some pictures of some of the calves if I can figure it out
I think you have to make so many posts before you're allowed to post pictures.
 

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Warren Allison

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I ain’t smart enough to explain it, but can vouch for a registered Angus bull siring a horned calf from a longhorn cow. Had one last year, he was pretty much solid black except for white belly. This year the cow had a horned calf from a polled Hereford bull. Have heard some people say it has to do with an African horn gene that some longhorns have.
If the longhorn wasn't registered, it might not be a purebred L:eek:ghorn. It might have some Watusi blood. Since the early 80's ....that I know of, and probably before that... people have used Watusi to breed with Longhorns, and Corrienttes. I did myself, whenever someone gave me a Watusi or part Watusi cow. I've had many a Watusi x Longhorn or Watusi x Corriente,, that I'd breed to Corriente bulls.. and those heifers to Corriente bulls, etc, and after that 2nd cross, you couldn't really tell them from Corrientes. But after I started breeding my roping stock cows to Angus and Brangus bulls to produce teampenning/sorting cattle, every once in a while we'd get a calf with some buttons... mostly l from the Brangus bulls. I bet now that I think on it, could probably have traced those momma cows back to find some of the Watusi crosses in the pedigree.
 

Jafruech

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Ok...let's clear up some of the bad information on here.

Absent the Ar gene (which is is sex linked in phenotypical expression) a homogeneous Polled (PP) bull or cow CANNOT produce horned offspring. Period.


If your Angus bull is somehow Heterozygous polled (Pp) and they are bred to a horned (pp) cow or another Hetero polled cow, then and only then can you get a horned offspring.

Scurs are NOT horns and are a completely different gene which is sex linked in expression as well.

LHs do not typically carry the Ar gene that Caustic mentions...85% of their genome is if Taurine descent and only 15% of Indicine...and Bos Indicus is where there Ar gene has come from....so if you have Brahman influence you are more likely to have the Ar gene present...but not all Indicine cattle carry it either....and even if they do it is only expressed in males....so if you have a cow that is throwing a horned calf out of a polled bull...and you know he is homo polled...cull her or run blood tests. Same with Scurs (Sc gene). I don't have a single horned half using a black angus or a Hereford bull on the F1s or F2s. The black Angus bulls create a very uniform calf crop. Chose LH cows that are solid color and are less likely to carry the wild color gene in them.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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