bottle calf

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

I got a bottle calf yesterday from a friend and have very little information on the correct ways to do everything. Can anyone give me a good link to basic info? We have horses, so I am not totally ignorant of livestock, but am new to cattle. I have started her on milk replacer and she is eating well today. She was very weak, but really seems to be coming around. How much milk is too much? I think if I would go out every couple of hours she would eat that often. Should I do this while she is weak or not? Any comments are appreciated. I tried the local vet, but they were already closed. I don't want to make any major mistakes before Monday when they open. Thanks.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

It depends on the size of the calf. If you have a good quality milk replacer, read the feeding directions on the bag for a calf of her size. It is always better to divide the basic amounts in half and feed 4 times a day vs: twice a day. Get her started on a good quality calf starter grain mix as soon as possible. A calf is always hungry if they are healthy, over feeding kills more calves then probably anything else. Keep her dry and out of drafts. It's amazing how low a temp. a calf can stand if they aren't wet or in a drafty situation. If it get's much below freezing, put some form of heat in her bedding place, a simple light bulb can do wonders if she is in a low roofed calf box. Good luck, you have taken on the single most challenging task in raising cattle, a bottle calf. Check your ingredients on the milk replacer, if they aren't derived primarily from milk or milk by-products and a minimum of 18 to 20 percent protein, get some on monday that is. @0 percent is even better.

dunmovin farms

> I got a bottle calf yesterday from
> a friend and have very little
> information on the correct ways to
> do everything. Can anyone give me
> a good link to basic info? We have
> horses, so I am not totally
> ignorant of livestock, but am new
> to cattle. I have started her on
> milk replacer and she is eating
> well today. She was very weak, but
> really seems to be coming around.
> How much milk is too much? I think
> if I would go out every couple of
> hours she would eat that often.
> Should I do this while she is weak
> or not? Any comments are
> appreciated. I tried the local
> vet, but they were already closed.
> I don't want to make any major
> mistakes before Monday when they
> open. Thanks.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Thanks for the info. The milk replacer seems to be a good one and I will get the grain mix on Monday. After doing some other reading, it seems that I am doing the right things. I had already done what you suggested about dividing the feedings up, and we have her in a stall in the barn with our horses. I cleaned the mud off as well as I could without water so that she could have some insulation from her hair and we have a heat lamp in her stall, as well. She's bedded on straw and shavings and has quit shivering, so I think she is warm enough. Now my main question is, should we get another to keep her company. She settles well after being fed, but I know that cattle, like horses, are herd animals and wondered if she should have a pal. Thanks again for your answer. It's reassuring to know that we are started in the right direction.

> It depends on the size of the
> calf. If you have a good quality
> milk replacer, read the feeding
> directions on the bag for a calf
> of her size. It is always better
> to divide the basic amounts in
> half and feed 4 times a day vs:
> twice a day. Get her started on a
> good quality calf starter grain
> mix as soon as possible. A calf is
> always hungry if they are healthy,
> over feeding kills more calves
> then probably anything else. Keep
> her dry and out of drafts. It's
> amazing how low a temp. a calf can
> stand if they aren't wet or in a
> drafty situation. If it get's much
> below freezing, put some form of
> heat in her bedding place, a
> simple light bulb can do wonders
> if she is in a low roofed calf
> box. Good luck, you have taken on
> the single most challenging task
> in raising cattle, a bottle calf.
> Check your ingredients on the milk
> replacer, if they aren't derived
> primarily from milk or milk
> by-products and a minimum of 18 to
> 20 percent protein, get some on
> monday that is. @0 percent is even
> better.

> dunmovin farms

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Here is a link about bottle feeding, the findings are pretty ambiguous but the part about the development of the digestive tract is interesting

dunmovin farms

> Thanks for the info. The milk
> replacer seems to be a good one
> and I will get the grain mix on
> Monday. After doing some other
> reading, it seems that I am doing
> the right things. I had already
> done what you suggested about
> dividing the feedings up, and we
> have her in a stall in the barn
> with our horses. I cleaned the mud
> off as well as I could without
> water so that she could have some
> insulation from her hair and we
> have a heat lamp in her stall, as
> well. She's bedded on straw and
> shavings and has quit shivering,
> so I think she is warm enough. Now
> my main question is, should we get
> another to keep her company. She
> settles well after being fed, but
> I know that cattle, like horses,
> are herd animals and wondered if
> she should have a pal. Thanks
> again for your answer. It's
> reassuring to know that we are
> started in the right direction.

Bottle Feeding
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Yes, it would be nice to have a mate for your calf, but everytime you introduce calves from different sources, you are mixing good and bad bugs. More than likely one or both will get sick. You have to weigh the risk. Many people will have a calf die during calving & run out and buy a holstein to put on the cow. Then they end up with their own calves getting sick and wonder why? Not knowing that this "healthy" calf introduced bugs that their herd was not immune to. You are only dealing with one other calf, so like I said, you have to decide. I deffinately would wait until this one was really on its feet. Jeanne
> Here is a link about bottle
> feeding, the findings are pretty
> ambiguous but the part about the
> development of the digestive tract
> is interesting

> dunmovin farms

Simme Valley in NY
[email protected]
 

Latest posts

Top