back fat?

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Anonymous

These boards have been so helpful. I never knew there was so much to raising cows.

One post interested me. The post talked about "back fat", and that the cows shouldn't have too much of it. I always thought that cows couldn't get fat, they just beefed up. I definately misunderstood.

Can someone tell me what that is? And if there are a few other simple things that I should watch for while raising a few cows?

I appreciate all the help that you guys give me.

Thanks,

Richard - UT

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A

Anonymous

While the ideal steer at slaughter has about .25 - .30 inches of backfat, a cow in most environments requires more then that. You don't want a cow to have pones of fat, but if she doesn't have adequate backfat she will have problems in severe winter weather. If a cow standing in normal snow doesn't have snow accumulate on her back, i.e. it melts as it falls, she will loose a lot of body heat.

dun

> These boards have been so helpful.
> I never knew there was so much to
> raising cows.

> One post interested me. The post
> talked about "back fat",
> and that the cows shouldn't have
> too much of it. I always thought
> that cows couldn't get fat, they
> just beefed up. I definately
> misunderstood.

> Can someone tell me what that is?
> And if there are a few other
> simple things that I should watch
> for while raising a few cows?

> I appreciate all the help that you
> guys give me.

> Thanks,

> Richard - UT
 
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A

Anonymous

I find that to be one of the most fascinating things about cattle -- especially the difference between breeds. Take my Jerseys for example, you'll never get a Jersey fat enough, or "wooly" enough, to insulate her that well. They just don't put on the fat or the hair coat, and will do much better if they can come inside during wet or snowy weather. The Angus crosses that I have however, are totally insulated -- snow might stay on their backs for weeks at a time. And the difference in efficiency is amazing too -- that Jersey cow needs more food to maintain herself in cold weather than the Angus crosses do to grow.

(not trying start anything about Angus here, just so happens that all the beef animals have strong Angus influence)

Ann B

> If a cow standing in
> normal snow doesn't have snow
> accumulate on her back, i.e. it
> melts as it falls, she will loose
> a lot of body heat.

> dun



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OP
A

Anonymous

"...that all the beef animals have strong Angus influence"

Do you really beleive that? Hereford people (at least) might strongly disagree.

> I find that to be one of the most
> fascinating things about cattle --
> especially the difference between
> breeds. Take my Jerseys for
> example, you'll never get a Jersey
> fat enough, or "wooly"
> enough, to insulate her that well.
> They just don't put on the fat or
> the hair coat, and will do much
> better if they can come inside
> during wet or snowy weather. The
> Angus crosses that I have however,
> are totally insulated -- snow
> might stay on their backs for
> weeks at a time. And the
> difference in efficiency is
> amazing too -- that Jersey cow
> needs more food to maintain
> herself in cold weather than the
> Angus crosses do to grow.

> (not trying start anything about
> Angus here, just so happens that
> all the beef animals have strong
> Angus influence)

> Ann B
 

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