Angus Outcross?

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talltimber

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If you were searching for an outcross to your current general makeup, how would you go about it? What's considered an outcross? How far back do you have to go in parentage, with no duplicates, to be considered an outcross?
 

Son of Butch

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Having a grandparent on one side of the pedigree and as a great grandparent on the other side of the pedigree is an inbreeding coefficient of 3.125% and would be considered an outcross pedigree by most all breeds when mated to any unrelated to him/her.

Rule of thumb: 8 different individuals as great grandparents = outcross pedigree
 

WalnutCrest

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Son of Butch":1poekcjk said:
Having a grandparent on one side of the pedigree and as a great grandparent on the other side of the pedigree is an inbreeding coefficient of 3.125% and would be considered an outcross pedigree by most all breeds when mated to any unrelated to him/her.

Rule of thumb: 8 different individuals as great grandparents = outcross pedigree

And yet if any / all of the 8 "different" grandparents are full (or 3/4, half or even 1/4) siblings, the inbreeding coefficients will be far higher than 3.125%.

I like of out 10 generations, and ideally counting the effects of aunts, uncles, cousins, etc.
 

Son of Butch

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WalnutCrest":1a9gjg1l said:
Son of Butch":1a9gjg1l said:
Rule of thumb: 8 different individuals as great grandparents = outcross pedigree

And yet if any or all of the 8 "different" grandparents are full (or 3/4, half or even 1/4) siblings,
the inbreeding coefficients will be far higher than 3.125%.
Yes they certainly can be, hence "Rule of Thumb" and not written in stone.

An example would be the Holstein breed average coefficient is approximately 6.25% = first cousins
The great Holstein show sire Goldwyn really sires beautiful daughters and stamps his pattern on them.
His sire James coefficient is 3.67% and his dam Baler Twine is 9.74%
But because of the intense linebreeding of both Grand and Aerostar in his pedigree
Goldwyn's inbreeding coefficient is 15.7%

All pure breeds have to have the same ancestors in common at some point to make them a breed.
The current angus genetic pool is more diverse than the holstein breed and many others.
In angus 8 different great grandparents in most all cases will not be a common inbreeding coefficient problem

IMO the direct correlation of inbreeding coefficient % and stillbirth % is the number #1 reason to outcross
 

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