2018 Sixth Calf - W/C Lock N Load

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Bright Raven

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Every calf has been early this fall.  This one is a week early. Star delivered down in the holler. I prefer to get them up and in the holding pen that adjoins the handling facility. Anywhere away from the headquarters is subject to predation from Black Vultures.

Dam: Star Baby.  My first home grown cow.  8 years old.  She breeds back, has a good udder, excellent feet, and stays in condition.

Sire: W/C lock n load 1143Y
Due: 09/11/2018
DOB: 9/4/2018
Gestation: 278 days
Weight: 83 pounds.   She has never had a calf over 74 pounds.   Also, never has much white on her calves.

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Bright Raven

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Gestation and BW numbers:
1. Broadway Heifer: 279, 97 lbs.
2. W/C Lock N Load 1143Y Bull: 279, 78 lbs.
3. Cowboy Cut Heifer: 277, 70 lbs
4. HPF Optimizer Bull: 280, 88 lbs.
5. Cowboy Cut Bull: 282, 94 lbs.
6. W/C Lock N Load 1143Y Bull: 278, 82 lbs.
 

True Grit Farms

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The calf is going to be tender footed. Nature has a way of dealing with things, birth weight up, gestation shorter. Evolution happens within 9 months?
 
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Bright Raven

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True Grit Farms":371otolx said:
The calf is going to be tender footed. Nature has a way of dealing with things, birth weight up, gestation shorter. Evolution happens within 9 months?

Evolution is a continuous process. Monumental changes can occur in an instant with one realignment of a chemical bond between the atoms in a gene.
 

wbvs58

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Bright Raven":3am5jdjp said:
True Grit Farms":3am5jdjp said:
The calf is going to be tender footed. Nature has a way of dealing with things, birth weight up, gestation shorter. Evolution happens within 9 months?

Evolution is a continuous process. Monumental changes can occur in an instant with one realignment of a chemical bond between the atoms in a gene.

You have an eloquent way of saying things Ron.

Ken
 
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Bright Raven

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wbvs58":16vsdu19 said:
Bright Raven":16vsdu19 said:
True Grit Farms":16vsdu19 said:
The calf is going to be tender footed. Nature has a way of dealing with things, birth weight up, gestation shorter. Evolution happens within 9 months?

Evolution is a continuous process. Monumental changes can occur in an instant with one realignment of a chemical bond between the atoms in a gene.

You have an eloquent way of saying things Ron.

Ken

Thank you Ken. That is a worthy comment. I appreciate that. You have the trained mind to grasp the simplicity yet huge significance of that simple composition.
 

kentuckyguy

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I’m starting to think the good pastures from all the rain this summer is contributing to calf size.

The first 2 calves we have on the ground are bigger than normal. Had a heifer calf hit the ground a few days ago that was definitely pushing 100lbs.
 
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Bright Raven

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kentuckyguy":2zg0o9r9 said:
I’m starting to think the good pastures from all the rain this summer is contributing to calf size.

The first 2 calves we have on the ground are bigger than normal. Had a heifer calf hit the ground a few days ago that was definitely pushing 100lbs.

It has to be a factor. My birthweights have been slowly going down the last 2 years. So far this year, the average is going back up. The pastures are absolutely amazing. Nutrition during the last trimester is definitely a big factor.
 

True Grit Farms

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Bright Raven":87nkucbu said:
kentuckyguy":87nkucbu said:
I’m starting to think the good pastures from all the rain this summer is contributing to calf size.

The first 2 calves we have on the ground are bigger than normal. Had a heifer calf hit the ground a few days ago that was definitely pushing 100lbs.

It has to be a factor. My birthweights have been slowly going down the last 2 years. So far this year, the average is going back up. The pastures are absolutely amazing. Nutrition during the last trimester is definitely a big factor.
I'm surprised that nutrition can affect calf size in such a short amount of time. I kinda sorta agree but have not seen that in my operation. Some of the really thin trader cows I buy take a year to look like the rest of my herd. Growing a fetus is a time consuming process.
 

lithuanian farmer

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What a beauty!
I've noticed that at least in our herd the birth weights changes each season. In winter- spring we have much bigger calves, while in summer, end of spring and especially around August-September they get smaller. There appears one or two bigger calves in summer, but nothing too extreme. In November their size increases again. If look at their feed at that time it should be the opposite. I did have heard from one of my friends that the first trimester also plays a huge role in the future newborn calf's size, as he had a group of heifers fed pretty well abit after they got incalf and he had some big calves from that group. I'm not sure if that's also important. Will be able to tell next spring... Our AI'ed heifers are on meal now and will be until winter, so will see how big their calves will be next year.
 

kentuckyguy

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True Grit Farms":19x7gobk said:
Bright Raven":19x7gobk said:
kentuckyguy":19x7gobk said:
I’m starting to think the good pastures from all the rain this summer is contributing to calf size.

The first 2 calves we have on the ground are bigger than normal. Had a heifer calf hit the ground a few days ago that was definitely pushing 100lbs.

It has to be a factor. My birthweights have been slowly going down the last 2 years. So far this year, the average is going back up. The pastures are absolutely amazing. Nutrition during the last trimester is definitely a big factor.
I'm surprised that nutrition can affect calf size in such a short amount of time. I kinda sorta agree but have not seen that in my operation. Some of the really thin trader cows I buy take a year to look like the rest of my herd. Growing a fetus is a time consuming process.


I’m not saying that’s what’s causing it just trying to consider any changes in our operation.

This is the third round of calves we are having out of a stonegate angus bull so we have a pretty good idea about what to expect. Same cows and same bull shouldn’t be much change.

The only thing I can think of that’s changed is we fed hay and grain longer during the early spring due to weather. Also the pastures have stayed green and lush pretty much all summer. Usually during July and August they get a little rough but not this year.
 

True Grit Farms

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kentuckyguy":3bph86ih said:
True Grit Farms":3bph86ih said:
Bright Raven":3bph86ih said:
It has to be a factor. My birthweights have been slowly going down the last 2 years. So far this year, the average is going back up. The pastures are absolutely amazing. Nutrition during the last trimester is definitely a big factor.
I'm surprised that nutrition can affect calf size in such a short amount of time. I kinda sorta agree but have not seen that in my operation. Some of the really thin trader cows I buy take a year to look like the rest of my herd. Growing a fetus is a time consuming process.


I’m not saying that’s what’s causing it just trying to consider any changes in our operation.

This is the third round of calves we are having out of a stonegate angus bull so we have a pretty good idea about what to expect. Same cows and same bull shouldn’t be much change.

The only thing I can think of that’s changed is we fed hay and grain longer during the early spring due to weather. Also the pastures have stayed green and lush pretty much all summer. Usually during July and August they get a little rough but not this year.
We sold cows the first week of May because we had no hay or grass left. Since then the grass has been growing like never before. Cut more hay in 2 cuttings then we usually cut in 3. We haven't noticed a increase in birthweights to the eye, but I have to believe it happens. I do know that spring calves are larger than fall calves, but our fall calves will wean at a higher weight.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Back to research - shows the last trimester the calf grows the most and is affected by nutrition more than any other time of gestation. High PROTEIN last trimester tends to go to the calf. But, also according to research, the added weight of the calf due to NUTRITION, rarely causes higher dystocia - but is extremely good for the cow. At most, researchers put an extra 10 pounds on a calf thru nutritional research.
 

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