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MillIronQH

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Where are the two worst places you ever had to build fence? For me they would be the blow sand country in Wilson county and in the Hill Country west of Kerrville. I helped a friend that managed a game ranch in the Hill Country put up 1500 feet of new high fence. We dug the holes for the T-posts with a jack hammer and cemented the posts into the holes. In the blow sand you can dig a 4' hole for a corner post in about 4 minutes after a week of rain. When it's dry the 4' hole is going to be 4' in diameter.Z
 

msscamp

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MillIronQH":3ij9xy02 said:
Where are the two worst places you ever had to build fence?

Over the chalk rock hills in Section 9. Had to bar out the holes, and was continually sliding down the hill. That section butted up to another property, so couldn't change the fence line, either.
 

backhoeboogie

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I've built plenty of fence in solid limestone across ridges. I've had to burst through 14 inch slabs of solid limestone. The last time I did that I took pictures to prove it. Fence posts from hades. You can bet your booties that I did not put wood in those holes. I put in steel. Never again will I dig a hole in limestone and put in wood only to see it get burned out in a brush fire.
 

Aaron

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Me and the neighbour put in 1/4 mile of new posts through the peat bog that divides part of our properties, about 4 years ago. We were both 17/18 at the time and sledged them all into position. Aim was to get about 80 posts sledged about 2 feet into the ground. A few never got that far because it was a cold summer and there was still some frost about a foot under the surface in the bog water holes. We also cleared a 10 foot path along the old fence line before we put the new posts in with a machete, axe and chainsaw. Took us two weeks of about 4-6 hours a day. Then we left for university and never finished it till this summer (obviously wasn't a crucial patch of land to be fenced :lol:). Still had to put 4 new barbed strands in a 400 foot stretch and patch up a few holes in the better wire.
 

GMN

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Across a creek, dividing property fence lines. To this day really haven't found anything that works and stays, when the creek goes up to a certain point the fence goes bye bye. While I'm talking about it, anybody got any suggestions for building a fence in a creek?

GMN
 

backhoeboogie

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GMN":2g1p29jb said:
Across a creek, dividing property fence lines. To this day really haven't found anything that works and stays, when the creek goes up to a certain point the fence goes bye bye. While I'm talking about it, anybody got any suggestions for building a fence in a creek?

GMN

Depending on how long it is, you can hinge the fence on a top rail. We had to span 100 feet across a creek once. We ran a top rail out of 2 1/2 inch pipe and put a 3 inch pipe sleeve over it. We braced the 2 1/2 inch pipe and sunk the posts in concrete every ten feet. The top rail was set at 5 feet overall but it was sloped down and up out of the creek. We welded 5 foot 6 rails on the inside of the structure and tied them to the outside sleeve. We then welded cow panels to the rails. When it rains and flows, the rails and panels pivot up and let all the debris through. When there is no flow, the rails fall back to the ground.
 

GMN

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backhoeboogie":pds4qlfl said:
GMN":pds4qlfl said:
Across a creek, dividing property fence lines. To this day really haven't found anything that works and stays, when the creek goes up to a certain point the fence goes bye bye. While I'm talking about it, anybody got any suggestions for building a fence in a creek?

GMN

Depending on how long it is, you can hinge the fence on a top rail. We had to span 100 feet across a creek once. We ran a top rail out of 2 1/2 inch pipe and put a 3 inch pipe sleeve over it. We braced the 2 1/2 inch pipe and sunk the posts in concrete every ten feet. The top rail was set at 5 feet overall but it was sloped down and up out of the creek. We welded 5 foot 6 rails on the inside of the structure and tied them to the outside sleeve. We then welded cow panels to the rails. When it rains and flows, the rails and panels pivot up and let all the debris through. When there is no flow, the rails fall back to the ground.

Sounds very inventive, are you in the construction business? This span, actually there are 2 creek fences, one is underneathe a Iron bridge, a span of 25 feet or so, and the other is smack in the middle of the creek, about 20 feet or so. The one under the bridge we have sunk fence posts in, and hung cattle panels off the inside of the bridge but underneathe it, but even then, when the creek floods, this fence doesn't go bye bye, but it does get damage to it. The other one we used fence posts, and heavy cable, plus barb wire, usually some remains, but most is gone after a flood. (We haven't had a flood in ages though) :) :)

Thanks for the reply

Gail
 

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