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boondocks

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"close up reg bred heifer
Close up heifer bred AI for sale."

Saw the above on CL. Does "close up" mean heavy-bred? Or that she's ready for her close-up, Mr. DeMille? :pretty: :pretty: :pretty:
 

Rafter S

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boondocks":3beet91r said:
"close up reg bred heifer
Close up heifer bred AI for sale."

Saw the above on CL. Does "close up" mean heavy-bred? Or that she's ready for her close-up, Mr. DeMille? :pretty: :pretty: :pretty:

Don't feel bad. I've never heard it either.
 

Workinonit Farm

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boondocks":lzdoyimd said:
"close up reg bred heifer
Close up heifer bred AI for sale."

Saw the above on CL. Does "close up" mean heavy-bred? Or that she's ready for her close-up, Mr. DeMille? :pretty: :pretty: :pretty:


1st- registered bred heifer, close to calving.
2nd- heifer bred through artificial insemination, close to calving.
 

Bigfoot

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Never heard that used either. I thought they were talking about line breeding.
 

Son of Butch

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Close Up - Northern slang, common to dairy farmers = bagging Up and Close to calving

When used by Southern cow/calf producers, Close Up = Near the trailer but Up the hill :)
 

ez14.

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Son of Butch":2yvq09c3 said:
Close Up - Northern slang, common to dairy farmers = bagging Up and Close to calving

When used by Southern cow/calf producers, Close Up = Near the trailer but Up the hill :)
:nod:
 

farmerjan

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Son of Butch":1sxljs61 said:
Close Up - Northern slang, common to dairy farmers = bagging Up and Close to calving

When used by Southern cow/calf producers, Close Up = Near the trailer but Up the hill :)
:lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Yep, it's Yankee talk, but also dairy talk as most of the dairy farmers that I test for here in Va also say close up for animals close to calving. I had to think a bit when I read some other descriptions in one post about the "heavy breds" and such.
 
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boondocks

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thanks all! I enjoy learning all the local sayings. It's funny how everyone gets so steeped in their own that they assume it's a widespread thing.

Case in point: when my son was a toddler he called music "Dee-Dah." Dunno why he did, but it stuck and became a family expression: "Hey, turn down the dee-dah." Or "let's put on some dee-dah." We were on a road trip last summer (and his girlfriend was along) and we got to discussing how families kind of get their own "language." I used "dee-dah" as an example. Son said "Whhaaaatttt? You mean that's not a saying?" The young man (who is intelligent and went to a perfectly acceptable school, I promise!) has spent years thinking it was a commonplace saying! He has used it with friends!!! Suffice it to say, we just about ran the car off the road laughing. (Us, not him). He still a litlle PO'd--thinks we "betrayed" him but we really thought that at some point he'd twigged to the fact that it was just "our thing." I still think it's hilarious. And now, thx to the gfriend, all of her family and all of his friends now think it's hilarious too!
 

Son of Butch

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boondocks":2lhdl519 said:
...when my son was a toddler he called music "Dee-Dah." Dunno why he did, but it stuck and became a family expression: "Hey, turn down the dee-dah." Or "let's put on some dee-dah." We were on a road trip last summer (and his girlfriend was along) and we got to discussing how families kind of get their own "language." I used "dee-dah" as an example. Son said "Whhaaaatttt?.... we really thought that at some point he'd twigged to the fact that it was just "our thing." I still think it's hilarious. And now, thx to the gfriend, all of her family and all of his friends now think it's hilarious too!
Funny and yes between my brothers even as old men we still use odd expressions from our youth that makes for
chuckles, but we each understand immediately and it brings back good memories.
 

reeler

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Son of Butch":258fsw6t said:
boondocks":258fsw6t said:
...when my son was a toddler he called music "Dee-Dah." Dunno why he did, but it stuck and became a family expression: "Hey, turn down the dee-dah." Or "let's put on some dee-dah." We were on a road trip last summer (and his girlfriend was along) and we got to discussing how families kind of get their own "language." I used "dee-dah" as an example. Son said "Whhaaaatttt?.... we really thought that at some point he'd twigged to the fact that it was just "our thing." I still think it's hilarious. And now, thx to the gfriend, all of her family and all of his friends now think it's hilarious too!
Funny and yes between my brothers even as old men we still use odd expressions from our youth that makes for
chuckles, but we each understand immediately and it brings back good memories.
Yes, odd expressions do trigger old memories.Boondocks "dee-dah" made me remember an old expression "la-de-dah" that we heard as kids. I always thought it was a nice way of saying "kiss my grits" :lol:
 
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boondocks

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reeler":3rrovdqw said:
Son of Butch":3rrovdqw said:
boondocks":3rrovdqw said:
...when my son was a toddler he called music "Dee-Dah." Dunno why he did, but it stuck and became a family expression: "Hey, turn down the dee-dah." Or "let's put on some dee-dah." We were on a road trip last summer (and his girlfriend was along) and we got to discussing how families kind of get their own "language." I used "dee-dah" as an example. Son said "Whhaaaatttt?.... we really thought that at some point he'd twigged to the fact that it was just "our thing." I still think it's hilarious. And now, thx to the gfriend, all of her family and all of his friends now think it's hilarious too!
Funny and yes between my brothers even as old men we still use odd expressions from our youth that makes for
chuckles, but we each understand immediately and it brings back good memories.
Yes, odd expressions do trigger old memories.Boondocks "dee-dah" made me remember an old expression "la-de-dah" that we heard as kids. I always thought it was a nice way of saying "kiss my grits" :lol:
I think that's what my son would like to tell me lol
 
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