Using locust for post

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Ky cowboy

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Started doing some dozer work at the farm I just bought, had a bunch of nice post size locust we saved for post. I heard one of the oldtimers saying that if they are cut when the sap is up they wouldn't last very long. Just looking for advice, or would like to know if anyone has ever used them when they were cut when the sap is up. Thanks
 

Workinonit Farm

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I've used some, don't know if they were cut with sap or down, but I will tell you, they are still out there, good and strong, 20 years later. They were heck to bang nails in to.
 

ddd75

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that saying is such BS..

they say.. cut them in the fall when the sap is dry and put them in the ground asap!!!


i've seen them rot like that in a few years.

like any wood.. they need set out for a few years to completely dry. I let mine sit out for at least 1.5 years before I use them. I have around 150 really nice locust posts sitting in 2 stacks right now almost ready to use.
 

Bright Raven

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The fence contractor said the main thing is to let them season. Best to season for at least 2 summers where they can be put in a crib stack so air gets around then. They do get very hard to drive staples in.
 
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Ky cowboy

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I'm only fencing the front 1/2 of the farm off this year. I'll just stack them in the barn and use them on the back line hopefully next year. I probably wont use them for corner post in case they do rot out sooner then they should.

While we're talking wood post, creosote vs cca treated. I pulled up some creosote post that had been there for 20+years anyone have experience with the cca treated post. Creosote are harder to find around here locally, and when you do they usually cost more.
 

Bright Raven

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callmefence":lsxoqdlk said:
Sell the locust and buy 3inch ss80 or better pipe. Weld up your braces with a diagonal to a Deadman. You'll have a stronger longer lasting brace....also hard to drive nails into.

Yes. But you can weld nails and other metal accessories onto the pipe post.
 

Farm Fence Solutions

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Ky cowboy":1yxskz3i said:
I'm only fencing the front 1/2 of the farm off this year. I'll just stack them in the barn and use them on the back line hopefully next year. I probably wont use them for corner post in case they do rot out sooner then they should.

While we're talking wood post, creosote vs cca treated. I pulled up some creosote post that had been there for 20+years anyone have experience with the cca treated post. Creosote are harder to find around here locally, and when you do they usually cost more.


CCA is better than Creosote, but either one needs to be properly applied to the posts. The last load of creosote posts we bought, we sent back after over a year of fighting with the treatment plant. 20 years ago, you had a much better chance of buying quality timber posts than you do today. Your local Western Kentucky treatment plant started out doing a good job, but have turned out nothing by trash for the past couple of years, so buyer beware. Fence gave you a good solution, but it's not perfect for those of us that live in wet areas. SS40 galvanized is a 100 year post, even in acidic soil....and it'll never rot your wire. Cheaper than SS80, too. Down where Fence lives, it'd dang sure be an easy choice to skip the galvanized. It only takes a year to start seeing rusty wire on raw steel posts around here, so that's why I'd prefer galvanized. I pulled some CCA posts this week that have moved with me twice in the past 20 years, and they are still just fine. I also have plenty that are 5 years old, and the only thing holding them up is the T post thats wired to them. As a consumer, you are entitled to bore sample test results from each charge that you purchase posts out of. I only know of one post treater that will actually provide the test results, and most of the rest don't even know what the standard is, let alone do any testing.
 

snoopdog

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I don't know sap up or down , but seasoned locust post can last 40years . I think metal is the way to go for corners at least though .
 

JW IN VA

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Here, we that know the difference,opt for black locust vs the other type.Usually referred to as mountain locust vs field locust.Mountain locust,seasoned, will last for years.I personally helped take out some once that had been in the ground for 45 years.Not like new but a few could still be reused.
I have used both creosote and CCA treated posts.IMO the CCA last better even in wet soil.My road fence was built in 1975.The 12" stay net is aout shot but the 6" stay on the other side is mostly fair to good shape.The posts will probably do to reuse.I restrung some 12" fence with hi tensile smooth about ten years ago and no problems so far.
One mistake I see people make with CCA is cutting off the tops to make them even and not putting any kind of sealer or cap on them.Opens the raw wood to catch water and rot.
 

M.Magis

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I have some (large) black locust posts here that were set at least in the 60s. I also have some less than 10 years old that are crap. I think a lot of it is determined by how well they’re tamped in. A poorly set post holds water every time it rains.
 

MtnCows93

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id just use them, the only problem you may have with green locust is them sprouting and trying to grow again or bark flaking off
 

skyhightree1

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Ky cowboy":2u2yeaij said:
Started doing some dozer work at the farm I just bought, had a bunch of nice post size locust we saved for post. I heard one of the oldtimers saying that if they are cut when the sap is up they wouldn't last very long. Just looking for advice, or would like to know if anyone has ever used them when they were cut when the sap is up. Thanks

That's all we used and my grandpa has post he put up in the 40's still standing and not rotted through... sometimes locust is so hard it will bend fence staples
 

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