Training pups

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angie1

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My pups are going to be 6 weeks on Monday, and I am starting to teach some basic expectations/behaviors/commands. For example, they have learned "no" and respond very well consistently, they are not attempting to repeat behaviors they have been told not to do ~ even the tempting ones like spilling diet coke and chewing cigarette packs. :roll:

Here is my concern ~ When I or anyone walks near them, they are wanting to grab pants, socks, boots, laces (basically grabbing ankles). Not only is it a seemingly obnoxious behavior, but I am worried they will loose teeth or get stepped on, I have kids in and out often. I am wondering if this is a behavior I should stop. It is an inherent behavior in herding animals. At least 2 of the 4 (probably 3) will be expected to work cattle in the future, and this behavior will be one of the tricks in their hat when working. If I prohibit it at this age, will they transfer that to "I am not allowed to grab at feet/legs/ankles."? Or will they know they cannot grab at people, but they can grab at cattle?

I do not want dogs that herd people, as I believe that this is a dangerous and disrespectful behavior in adult dogs.

I have been told by 2 different people in as many days that I am over analyzing their behavior, and maybe this is so too.

This reads like rambling, but if you can figure out what I am asking, advice would be appreciated. :help:
 

Running Arrow Bill

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What kind of dogs (pups) do you have?

Any behavior that is non-acceptable in a puppy will probably accelerate when they are older if not corrected. Grabbing, snipping, etc., at feet, etc., should be stopped.

A firm "NO" along with a light "swat" on he nose (repeated as needed) should correct the behavior. You must be consistent!

IF, for example, your puppies are "herding" breeds, problem is more difficult to correct.

All puppies (like infant humans) analyze their environment by tasting things and putting in their mouths. Get one or more chew toys, rag dolls, or whatever to redirect them to an appropriate item.

Since your puppies appear to understand "NO", this is an excellent start!

Hang in there and continue your training!
 

3waycross

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Try a squirt gun. Never saw a dog yet that won't stop what they're doin if they get squirted in the face every time they do it. One things for sure they won't associate that kind of correction with cattle.

Instead of the NO command you can also use the word ICK spoken forcefully like a command when you correct them. It works because it mimics a sound their mother makes when she corrects their behavior
 
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angie1

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Running Arrow Bill":k871t491 said:
What kind of dogs (pups) do you have?
Australian Shepards

All puppies (like infant humans) analyze their environment by tasting things and putting in their mouths. Get one or more chew toys, rag dolls, or whatever to redirect them to an appropriate item.
They have a stuffed monkey with really long arms that they like to tug against each other with, a small frog they can carry in their mouth, and a few tennis balls they make roll then chase ~ all of which they really get a big kick out of!
A couple of them needed 2 swats ~ the other two got it the first time. Now they all respond instantly to, as you say, a firm "no". All the rest of their learning at this age is play based, positive and fun. They are potty trained, and getting used to collars and car rides (I am starting to take 2 at a time in the car with me if I am just running to town quick ~ trying to teach them to stay on the floor on the passenger side, if the next owner wants different then that is ok).

They are coming into a rapid concrete learning stage, and I want to do the right things. Their father is an outstanding cattle dog, but can herd anything well (will carefully gather chickens into the coop for example). Mine works very well with goats and horses. She is intimidated by cattle that turn back on her ~ though that was getting less at last attempt. Dogs are only as smart as their owners, I am sure she would do very well if only I knew more. Anyhow, want to get these guys off on the right foot.

Thank you for your helpful advice! :tiphat:
 
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angie1

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3waycross":1j675r6q said:
Instead of the NO command you can also use the word ICK spoken forcefully like a command when you correct them. It works because it mimics a sound their mother makes when she corrects their behavior
This is a good idea, but I am training them for their next owners ~ they will be gone soon. I want to use words that will be consistent with what their new owners will use. "Ick" and "Ish" are interchangeable in Mn, and I think locals would be hesitant to use it. Hard to teach old dogs new tricks. :lol2:
 

3waycross

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angie":2oewwg7d said:
3waycross":2oewwg7d said:
Instead of the NO command you can also use the word ICK spoken forcefully like a command when you correct them. It works because it mimics a sound their mother makes when she corrects their behavior
This is a good idea, but I am training them for their next owners ~ they will be gone soon. I want to use words that will be consistent with what their new owners will use. "Ick" and "Ish" are interchangeable in Mn, and I think locals would be hesitant to use it. Hard to teach old dogs new tricks. :lol2:

The actual command is EH but the way you folks talk that loses a lot in the translation also_Oh he[[ why not just forget it and tell them no. Even Ole and Lena can't screw that up.
 

MistyMorning

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angie":hwv1d0ms said:
They are potty trained, and getting used to collars and car rides (I am starting to take 2 at a time in the car with me if I am just running to town quick ~

Thank you for your helpful advice! :tiphat:
One additional piece of advice, when doing all that riding around stuff, don't go reaching for any of those leftover "egg rolls" laying about. :D
 

cross_7

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just my two cents
i don't hit or swat or strike ever.
when a pup does something wrong, i growl at him like his mother would... it works trust me.
an older dog that does not react to a growl or an aiiihjt!!!
i grab him by the scruff of the neck and tell him no!!!!
and if that doesn,t do the trick i add a little shake when i've got a hold of him.
that always works.

i don't start them on cattle until they are 8-10 months old(maybe goats at 2-3 months just to be sure they have the instinct)
at 8-10months i put them on 300-400 pound calves.
if you have never trained a dog, i reccomend ben means training video
but the dog must have a strong desire to work or this method has to be adapted to a weaker dog.
(i don't adapt, i get a better dog..weak dogs quit when you need them the most)

keep in mind
most working dogs have ben bred for the last 200 years to gather cattle, so it goes against their instinct to drive cattle.
good luck and be patiencent
 
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angie1

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cross_7":par94jhp said:
just my two cents
i don't hit or swat or strike ever.
when a pup does something wrong, i growl at him like his mother would... it works trust me.
an older dog that does not react to a growl or an aiiihjt!!!
i grab him by the scruff of the neck and tell him no!!!!
and if that doesn,t do the trick i add a little shake when i've got a hold of him.
that always works.

i don't start them on cattle until they are 8-10 months old(maybe goats at 2-3 months just to be sure they have the instinct)
at 8-10months i put them on 300-400 pound calves.
if you have never trained a dog, i reccomend ben means training video
but the dog must have a strong desire to work or this method has to be adapted to a weaker dog.
(i don't adapt, i get a better dog..weak dogs quit when you need them the most)

keep in mind
most working dogs have ben bred for the last 200 years to gather cattle, so it goes against their instinct to drive cattle.
good luck and be patiencent
I have to admit I have caught it some over swatting the pups since posting this, and have taken the advice to heart ~ especially since one of the critics is a future owner. I have been told by locals not to start on cattle until they are a year old an have their basic training down pat. Both my female and the male she was bred to will drive well, but he is better at gathering ~ his training was much better.

They will only be mine for a short time longer, and I will miss them terribly. I spend a tremendous amount of time with them now. I will be patient, thank you for your advice. :nod:
 
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angie1

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MistyMorning":7bk4b9va said:
One additional piece of advice, when doing all that riding around stuff, don't go reaching for any of those leftover "egg rolls" laying about. :D
The voice of experience! :nod: I had forgotten about your unfortunate mishap.
I am thinking I would not do such a thing as that, but thanks anyhow MM. ;-)
 
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angie1

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My female, Ruby ~ she is standing weird on her back legs because she is ready to bound after the ball that someone is holding in front of her, but you get the idea.

003_12A.jpg
 

mnmtranching

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Angie, after a year or so when you get done with the fine tuning with them pups.
I would like one. :cowboy:
 
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angie1

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mnmtranching":uemhl3rd said:
Angie, after a year or so when you get done with the fine tuning with them pups.
I would like one. :cowboy:
Ah ~ but then you miss the opportunity to shape its little mind, teach it right from wrong, get rid of obnoxious behaviors, teach it cool tricks. Just ask BL ~ I have a feeling she has some experience with the joys of this type of training (just not dogs...). ;-)
 

2/B or not 2/B

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Angie,
I have an australian cattle dog and here is what I did with her instead of swatting her when she was little. If she would try to bite my clothes or mouth my hands I'd say "ouch" loudly and act like she really hurt me. I'd try to say it loud and sudden enough that it kind of startled her. It only took a few times and she got it. Then instead of biting, she'd hear me say ouch and start licking. When puppies play with each other, they fight and bite and learn to stop when they go too far and the other pup cries mercy. If you start by doing this just when they bite your hands and arms, it transfers pretty easily to clothing. Anyhow, she's 3 now and it's still ingrained in her that whenever I say ouch, she lets go.

As far as the herding, I don't know about that one. She did it a little bit and i didn't discourage it. She was much more interested in herding the other dogs, the cat, the horses, and the cows. She no longer tries to herd people. She's learned people are the boss.
 

mnmtranching

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angie":2txthqe7 said:
mnmtranching":2txthqe7 said:
Angie, after a year or so when you get done with the fine tuning with them pups.
I would like one. :cowboy:
Ah ~ but then you miss the opportunity to shape its little mind, teach it right from wrong, get rid of obnoxious behaviors, teach it cool tricks. Just ask BL ~ I have a feeling she has some experience with the joys of this type of training (just not dogs...). ;-)

BL is happy with the cool trick training, still working on getting rid of the obnoxious behavior. :nod: :help:
 

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