Toyota farm truck?

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farmboy80

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Going to be looking for a 3/4 ton truck. Just curious why you don't see any Toyota or Nissan farm trucks. Is it just because there foreign? Or are there other reasons?
 

talltimber

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There are several in my area. The old school trucks though, the less than full size, small and mid sized ones. Seems like they go a long time. No big loads or trailering though that I have seen.
 

City Guy

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I've often thought that a small truck would be more practical than one of those JD Gators (What's the generic name?). Those little things are just glorified golf carts IMO. Of course I've had no experience.
 

True Grit Farms

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City Guy":2cbav25k said:
I've often thought that a small truck would be more practical than one of those JD Gators (What's the generic name?). Those little things are just glorified golf carts IMO. Of course I've had no experience.

Most of us that have RTV's have or had small trucks also. Once you get a RTV for the farm you can't do without it. The ease of entry and exit, turning radius, fuel mileage can't be beat. A while back my wife figured up our expense to operate and maintain our Kubota 1140 and it worked out to less than $2.00 per hour and that includes insurance.
 

TCRanch

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True Grit Farms":3utlvbm3 said:
City Guy":3utlvbm3 said:
I've often thought that a small truck would be more practical than one of those JD Gators (What's the generic name?). Those little things are just glorified golf carts IMO. Of course I've had no experience.

Most of us that have RTV's have or had small trucks also. Once you get a RTV for the farm you can't do without it. The ease of entry and exit, turning radius, fuel mileage can't be beat. A while back my wife figured up our expense to operate and maintain our Kubota 1140 and it worked out to less than $2.00 per hour and that includes insurance.

X 10!
 

JW IN VA

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I have an old '95 Explorer that I use when I don't need to run the diesel pickup.I have said that should something happen to it,I might look at a Toyota to do the" gofer" jobs.At 6'1" and 290 lbs,I 'd have to get a extended cab to get the seat back.Friend of mine has a diesel truck for HD work but rides in his T100 a lot.
A lot of the bear hunters around here run Toyota.Must be okay.
 

M-5

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City Guy":340d6fd7 said:
I've often thought that a small truck would be more practical than one of those JD Gators (What's the generic name?). Those little things are just glorified golf carts IMO. Of course I've had no experience.
Then by all means get you one for your make believe farm.
 
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farmboy80

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I was talking about for a all use "big" truck. Hay hauling, trailer pulling, four wheeling truck. You don't see to many pulling a cattle trailer or with a hay bed. Just curious why not?
 

JW IN VA

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dIf you are talking about the Tundra,The payload is around 2000# and towing max. around 10,000.This is half-ton class.You aren't going to see many F-150s pulling goosenecks or hauling hay beds.
 

Atimm693

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Because all of the Japanese trucks are too light duty for most work. Their payload capacity is a ton or less, towing capacity in the 6-10k range, and I think 10k is very optimistic. Compare that to an F250 at around 2 tons of payload and 12-13k towing capacity.

A guy could probably pull a light gooseneck with one, but a hay bed is definitely out of the question.

We use a Suzuki Carry mini-truck as a run around/feed truck and a Dodge diesel with a Bessler hydraulic bed.
 

City Guy

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TCRanch":45kh9eox said:
True Grit Farms":45kh9eox said:
City Guy":45kh9eox said:
I've often thought that a small truck would be more practical than one of those JD Gators (What's the generic name?). Those little things are just glorified golf carts IMO. Of course I've had no experience.

Most of us that have RTV's have or had small trucks also. Once you get a RTV for the farm you can't do without it. The ease of entry and exit, turning radius, fuel mileage can't be beat. A while back my wife figured up our expense to operate and maintain our Kubota 1140 and it worked out to less than $2.00 per hour and that includes insurance.

X 10!

I think we are talking about different vehicles. The 4 wheel "Gators" are what I had in mind. As I said I'm not sure of the generic name, I believe I've heard them called "Mules". What I picture when you say "RTV" is similar in appearance to a three wheeled motorcycle. I have always thought of them as "ATV"; are they the same as an "RTV"?
Any way, I have examined the mules at the Farm Progress Show and other exhibits and asked some questions. Seems to me that they offer very little for the money. They can't go all the places an ATV/RTV can handle, the cargo capacity is too small and the low sides of the bed limit it's use. Seems to me that a small, no-frills PU would be more practical. It can go on road as a gofer cheaper than a full size PU and carry more cargo than a mule. One would still need a larger truck for towing heavier loads, of course.
I can definitely see the advantage of an ATV/RTV on a place that has steep slopes, rough terrain or heavy brush or timber. If I have this all wrong, please enlighten me.
 

TCRanch

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City Guy,
Technically a UTV. Gators, Polaris Ranger, Kubota, Honda are just a few. For our needs we have 2 Polaris Rangers and we do have rough terrain, slopes, go through creeks - you name it. We drive appx 1 mile on county roads to get to 2 of our pastures.
We definitely use them more than the trucks and they're practically indestructible - I've rolled one before with barely a scratch (on the vehicle; I didn't fare as well). They're relatively inexpensive & easy to maintain. It's really just a matter of preference but a small truck would not accommodate our needs.
http://www.polaris.com/en-us/ranger-utv ... rsuit-camo
 

callmefence

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I've got a 2000 tundra that I use for checking on cows on lease pastures. Its a good little truck and easy on the pocket. But I wouldn't want to do any heavy work with it. I've got a utv and home and it's nice to have. But I could get by without it.
I'd say biggest benefit is its easy on the pastures compared to a truck.
What I couldn't do without is a( atv) four wheeler. The worse my knees get , the more I depend on one.
 

M-5

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Rtv/rtv are far more useful than a pickup or jeep on most places. Whether it's rough terrain or not. First of all cost to operate mine is about a 1.00 per hr . I keep a couple of boxes in back , fence tool box , a box with tags , bands, jumpstart and a couple of doses of b12 . I can hook to the hay stealer and feed with it if I want , I can move wagons around . I feed the heifers 2 buckets every evening . I can manuver it thru woods and check fences. I drive it several miles hunting quite often and can park it right beside my stand. In the hay fields when I break down I can jump on it and go get stuff from barn quicker than taking the truck. Get out snd Opening gates is easier. I have a small trailer that has all my fence supplies in it . post wire etc just hook to it and go whereever. The foot print is smaller does not rut up grass like a truck . I've tried using a golf cart and it does not work. So in the real world most of us live in your comments are as useless as tits on a boar hog.
 

1wlimo

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The Tundra is not a truck to work hard, a couple here do oil/gas type work the rest r used as cars.

My every day driver and farm truck is an old Toyota pickup and they run a long time and work. No UTV here, my truck or ATV.

Now if you any where else in world you could buy a Toyota Land cruiser and they both work hard and last. Not technical y in the same class as a 3\4 but would work as hard for longer than most.
 

Brute 23

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farmboy80":1empghuv said:
Going to be looking for a 3/4 ton truck. Just curious why you don't see any Toyota or Nissan farm trucks. Is it just because there foreign? Or are there other reasons?

They are made more light duty than Ford, Chevy, Dodge and do not hold up to the same abuse.

That's the same reason you don't see them in in the oilfield either.
 

Brute 23

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City Guy":6eja0q2f said:
TCRanch":6eja0q2f said:
True Grit Farms":6eja0q2f said:
Most of us that have RTV's have or had small trucks also. Once you get a RTV for the farm you can't do without it. The ease of entry and exit, turning radius, fuel mileage can't be beat. A while back my wife figured up our expense to operate and maintain our Kubota 1140 and it worked out to less than $2.00 per hour and that includes insurance.

X 10!

I think we are talking about different vehicles. The 4 wheel "Gators" are what I had in mind. As I said I'm not sure of the generic name, I believe I've heard them called "Mules". What I picture when you say "RTV" is similar in appearance to a three wheeled motorcycle. I have always thought of them as "ATV"; are they the same as an "RTV"?
Any way, I have examined the mules at the Farm Progress Show and other exhibits and asked some questions. Seems to me that they offer very little for the money. They can't go all the places an ATV/RTV can handle, the cargo capacity is too small and the low sides of the bed limit it's use. Seems to me that a small, no-frills PU would be more practical. It can go on road as a gofer cheaper than a full size PU and carry more cargo than a mule. One would still need a larger truck for towing heavier loads, of course.
I can definitely see the advantage of an ATV/RTV on a place that has steep slopes, rough terrain or heavy brush or timber. If I have this all wrong, please enlighten me.

They can go where trucks cant both in size and from an off-road stand point. They don't rut up the ground near as much. They are cheaper to operate. If you need more room they have no problem being able to tow a trailer. Plus, if I stab a tire, stick it in the mud, or drive it off a cliff... worse case I have to walk back to the truck... not all the way home.

They are worth every penny IMO. Most of have heavy duty trucks or nicer trucks and it keeps from having to own two trucks. I pull a little trailer with my mule and drop it down at each place. It saves a lot of wear and tear on my truck.
 

kenny thomas

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I have a 1995 Toyota I drive every night on the farm. It is an extended cab but barely has room for me to sit down but has almost anything I need in it. But it goes anywhere that's safe to go. Also have a Polaris professional series 6x6 and love it for chores where I am near the barn.
Also have a Dodge flatbed 3500. It is rarely unhooked from the cattle trailer. Used only 2-3000 miles a year.
 

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