Tire machine vs manual tire changer

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skyhightree1

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I want a tire changer I'm spending alotnon tire mounting balance and stem changes.. the local meth heads own a tire shop but have gotten stupid high.. what's a good used tires machine cost? Who has a machine? Does anyone use the manual changer? Give me your thoughts.
 

CVAR

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I hear ya on the cost of tire work. There came a time for me when I felt like I was taking a tire in to town once or twice a week and thought I was having horrible tire luck. But then I realized (and counted) how many actual tires I had between all the tractors, equipment, vehicles of every sort, etc and it was well over hundred. At that moment I knew if I didn’t start doing some of my own work, I’d go broke just fixing tires. I began patching/repairing all my own tires using an ultra cheap harbor freight manual changer and it works great (slightly hard on a bad back). Typical with harbor freight steel, the bead breaker portion bent on it a bit but I was able to bend it back (I found soapy water to be one of the most important parts to these manual changers, everything is much easier to mount/dismount if it’s hit w/soapy water.) I’ve been wanting to purchase an older coats or similar machine as they regularly pop up on cl but haven’t yet - it’s on the list though. I recommend trying one of the cheapo manual changers first - you can order patches and vulcanizing cement on eBay or Amazon along with heavy duty stems of all sizes. I use my cordless drill with a wire wheel to lightly rough the patch area and I have yet to have a single issue with patches of all types. More than the cost, it’s really a time saver and convenience when you have a specialty farm tire (which some shops throw their nose up at)...Wouldn’t ever be without one again. There’s a bunch of YouTube vids that can give you the basics (as brainless as it sounds, there really is a few things that will save a whole lot of heartache and backbreak if you learn how to mount and dismount them right)
 

CVAR

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Mine works incredible and the nice part is rim size doesn’t really matter (unless it’s so big it will bend the steel on the changer) one of the reasons I haven’t bought an old coats or other machine is because a lot of the ones I see don’t go up very high on rim size (which is why I feel like they’re selling it in the first place) so make sure to check that skyhigh if you buy one. Seems like my tire probs usually hit on sundays or afternoons when everything is closed - using the manual changer puts me right back in the field in no time.
 

Rmc

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Coats tire machines will change up to 20 inch tires with a spacer in the bead breaker. A tire hammmer ,handy man jack ,and a couple of tire bars are all that is needed to repaie a tire while still on the tractor.
 

Atimm693

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The manual ones are quite a bit better than doing it on the ground, but it's still not easy.

I bought a cheapie tire machine on eBay a few years ago. It was $500 and has easily paid for itself, plus there's the convenience factor. I order all of my tires online and out them on myself now, not limited by what the tire shop can get or has in stock.

I can't balance them, but most of the tires I deal with don't need it.
 

moses388

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If you buy a tire changer, you will still need somebody to do the balancing. Is there a used car dealer nearby that would charge less then the tire shop for repairs?

There is a lot of stuff to buy in order to do your own tires:
extra tire iron
bead lube (or dish soap)
bead sealer
valve stems
core removal tool
valve stem fisher
buff cleaner
cement
patches
patch roller stitcher
rim cleaning tool

Make sure the tire changer you buy can handle all your different tire sizes.

Like CVAR, I use a manual tire changer from Harbor Freight. Mine is made to handle up to a 16" tire. I think all the newer pickup tires are bigger than 16". I take tires to the local tire shop, but I like having a tire changer. If I get a tire back from the shop that's still not fixed, I can do it myself. Or if it's an easy fix like a valve stem, I do that myself. Or I'll do it myself if everything is closed.
 

jltrent

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I change a lot myself on farm equipment with a bead breaker and a couple pry bars. A tire changer would be nice, but the balancer part can get very expensive. The last time I went to get auto tires their tire balancer was torn up and waiting on a repair guy that charges $200/hour to repair and he was the only choice. That might be one of the reasons they have to charge what they charge.
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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I hear ya on the cost of tire work. There came a time for me when I felt like I was taking a tire in to town once or twice a week and thought I was having horrible tire luck. But then I realized (and counted) how many actual tires I had between all the tractors, equipment, vehicles of every sort, etc and it was well over hundred. At that moment I knew if I didn’t start doing some of my own work, I’d go broke just fixing tires. I began patching/repairing all my own tires using an ultra cheap harbor freight manual changer and it works great (slightly hard on a bad back). Typical with harbor freight steel, the bead breaker portion bent on it a bit but I was able to bend it back (I found soapy water to be one of the most important parts to these manual changers, everything is much easier to mount/dismount if it’s hit w/soapy water.) I’ve been wanting to purchase an older coats or similar machine as they regularly pop up on cl but haven’t yet - it’s on the list though. I recommend trying one of the cheapo manual changers first - you can order patches and vulcanizing cement on eBay or Amazon along with heavy duty stems of all sizes. I use my cordless drill with a wire wheel to lightly rough the patch area and I have yet to have a single issue with patches of all types. More than the cost, it’s really a time saver and convenience when you have a specialty farm tire (which some shops throw their nose up at)...Wouldn’t ever be without one again. There’s a bunch of YouTube vids that can give you the basics (as brainless as it sounds, there really is a few things that will save a whole lot of heartache and backbreak if you learn how to mount and dismount them right)

I bought a harbor freight one on the way home I'm gonna brace the bead breaker and build a outdoor concrete pad and bolt it to. I plug my tires now but since I'll have the tire changer I'll use boots on things I can't plug
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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If you buy a tire changer, you will still need somebody to do the balancing. Is there a used car dealer nearby that would charge less then the tire shop for repairs?

There is a lot of stuff to buy in order to do your own tires:
extra tire iron
bead lube (or dish soap)
bead sealer
valve stems
core removal tool
valve stem fisher
buff cleaner
cement
patches
patch roller stitcher
rim cleaning tool

Make sure the tire changer you buy can handle all your different tire sizes.

Like CVAR, I use a manual tire changer from Harbor Freight. Mine is made to handle up to a 16" tire. I think all the newer pickup tires are bigger than 16". I take tires to the local tire shop, but I like having a tire changer. If I get a tire back from the shop that's still not fixed, I can do it myself. Or if it's an easy fix like a valve stem, I do that myself. Or I'll do it myself if everything is closed.
I have a old school balance
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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I put it together and braced it
 

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cfpinz

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A buddy of mine and myself split an old Coats 5030 a few years ago, very handy to have around. It's not real fond of 14 ply trailer tires, but it gets the job done.
 
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skyhightree1

skyhightree1

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Rmc

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It is easier as well as faster to change them with a tire hammer and bars then the harbor freight tire machine
 

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