Stupid weather

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rockridgecattle

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So here we are again trying and i stress trying to make hay.
First was the crappy cold damp spring. Nites close to freezing in May and June. The alfalfa did little growing. The pastures were slow.
Second, it was the lagus bug and the alfalfa weavels eating the alfalfa down to the stock.
Out came the matador $600 and hiring a guy to spray for $500. the guy did a good job, those GPS's in the sprayers saved alot of $. Anyhow we justified the cost of spraying cause you can barely get a load of hay, good hay in the yard for $1000.00 by they time you add in freight. Then the blooms on the alfalfa came nice. They are big, the plants have lots and leaves. Spraying paid off big time.

Now the rains. Dang it all to heck if it does not rain sometimes just enough to shut down the equipement. Then it dries up enough to bale, make 1-5 blaes and another shower hits. Wait for it to dry, start again, another shower hits. And on it goes. We get one or two days of drying weather then 5-7 days of rain or clound and cold, nothing drying down. As a norm, we do not hay on Sunday's. But for the third Sunday in a row hubby is out baling. I would be there to help too, but F-I-L baler has been down for weeks. Works a few bales then fixes and so on.
We need a warm dry August. A touch of rain once week for the pasture. But dang it we need heat. We are usually done the tame hay by now, and we have barely made 200 bales.
And if that did not beat all, the foot rot cases this year. Last year deluges of rain, no foot rot. This year cool and damp not alot of rain to speak of, just little showers, but we have had 6 cases of foot rot. We added a pile of salt to the mineral they decided not to eat, added more iodine for good measures...hope to get the problem under control, as well as treating the lame. Foot rot has been so rare these last 7 years that this just plain dumb luck. A calf got it of all things...ugg.
Postive thinking....warm August, warm August warm August....dang storm coming in, hubby off to bale what he can before it hits.
 

novaman

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I would rather battle the rain and have something to work with than have a drought and have nothing to work with.
 
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rockridgecattle

rockridgecattle

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Nova, most definitely, a I agree. However, to much rain can be just as bad as no rain.
-pastures have no feed value cause the grass is all water
-feed put up has no protien or TDN value due to the rains on the feed while down causing cows to loose bcs in the winter months thus incuring costs on buying feed.
Been on both sides of the fence

Either way, to much rain or not enough amoun to the same problem...crap pasture and and crap hay. both no good for cows
 

1982vett

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Yep, understand your problems. I'm probably going to go thru some too. Since we've finally gotten something to green up and start growing, what is going to be it's demise? Grasshoppers? Armyworms? Week long 103 degree temps that are forecast for the next week? Will it rain again before November? Will it rain then if it doesn't in between?

At least for now I'm not having to feed hay and probably have enough moisture and growth on the grass to go till the middle of September. Things are looking a lot better here. Hope they get better for you too.
 

novaman

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rockridgecattle":1opdk96o said:
Nova, most definitely, a I agree. However, to much rain can be just as bad as no rain.
-pastures have no feed value cause the grass is all water
-feed put up has no protien or TDN value due to the rains on the feed while down causing cows to loose bcs in the winter months thus incuring costs on buying feed.
Been on both sides of the fence

Either way, to much rain or not enough amoun to the same problem...crap pasture and and crap hay. both no good for cows
I understand where you're coming from but I have to respectfully disagree. We are having similar weather as you. The pastures have a lot more feed value even if they are more lush. Our beef cows are in very good condition and the calves are far bigger this year with no creep feed then they were prior years with creep feed. As far as the feed having no value, you had mentioned the blooms on the alfalfa were very big. It seems your hitting it a bit too late and losing feed value because of the maturity of the crop. Maybe I am lucky but whenever I've had a wet year, like this year, I have always come out much much further ahead than any average to dry year.
 

Stocker Steve

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rockridgecattle":1jt8vayc said:
Nova, most definitely, a I agree. However, to much rain can be just as bad as no rain.
-pastures have no feed value cause the grass is all water

"Wet" is relative, but a lush watery grass environment can increase the number offoot rot cases.
 

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