Spraying locust

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snoopdog

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When basal bark spraying with remedy /diesel, how long before you see results ? And can you just push them over and pile them afterwards ? Honey locust . Thanks ahead of time .
 

Allenw

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Directions say to wait a year after treatment before removing the tree.
 

dun

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I was just discussing this the MO conservation forester last week. Wrist size and smaller you can get by with just a basal spray. Bigger then that you need to girdle it and spray in the girdle. For us, late feb early march is as soon as you can do it. The deal is you have to kill the entire root structure, some of whihc can be a hundred feet or so away. I would wait until everything is wilted before pushing. Depending on the sap situation it can run from a couple of weeks to a month before you can see any results.
 

bird dog

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If you are spraying now the plant will probably leaf out and then die or get very weak this spring. If you spray a grove of trees it is very difficult to get all of them on the first attempt. Foliar spray what grows back in the spring or summer. Locust when completely dead when I have done them, will just blow over or a cow will knock them over. Spray one year and clean them up the next two.

Individual trees are not that difficult to kill. Groups of trees will take two or three treatments. Getting rid of the dead tress is the biggest pain of the operation.
 

kenny thomas

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We use Garlon 4 with good results. But as dun stated it only works up to so big then better to girtle and spray. During the winter we cut and spray the stumps with diesel/garlon at 50/50. Excellent kill.
 

Bigfoot

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I have fought honey locust, my entire adult life. I have luck with basal, and not girdeling all the way up to about 10 inches in diameter. I spray in late august. I figure the remedy goes up and get the leaves, and then falls and gets the roots. No science to prove that, but I have seen results.
 

Allenw

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Bigfoot":5swrkfii said:
I have fought honey locust, my entire adult life. I have luck with basal, and not girdeling all the way up to about 10 inches in diameter. I spray in late august. I figure the remedy goes up and get the leaves, and then falls and gets the roots. No science to prove that, but I have seen results.


I've done honey locust and hedge both up to about 10 inches diameter.
 

Texasmark

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Locally it's referred to as Black Locust with thorns of 2-3" on mature trees. I have a little and cut the trees and their root shoots down. Across from me is a large pasture and a couple of years ago a helicopter doing airborne spraying doused the field pretty good. Don't know the chemical but being a commercial sprayer one would think that they knew what would work and what wouldn't.

Some of the small (Dime coin size or smaller) trees died. Others look dead but in scraping the bark there is green. The large trees, (5") or so showed damage on the half that was toward the oncoming spray and no damage on the lee side (spraying done in the late summer). My take on the operation was that it was a financial failure, not achieving the desired effect, but the trees were everywhere.

What's funny is that other trees, like Bois-De-Arc in particular, weren't affected in the slightest. So maybe that's a cue as to what was used.
 

Bigfoot

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A locust post will last a really really long time. A dead locust tree rots pretty quick. Doesn't add up to me though. I don't have excavation equipment. After about a year, I get log chain around it and pull them over with my tractor. Much better than trying to cut the things.
 

dun

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If you cut a large one and really sok the snot out the cadmium layer with basal spray, i.e. Remedy + Diesel it will kill the once connected with that particular tree, but it takes a long time. And you will notice that a tree a long distance away will die and ones closer won't even wilt. That's the root node deal that I always harp on with locusts
 
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snoopdog

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Sprayed yesterday till I froze out , according to a forestry site which Icant recall that said now was the time . I wouldn't expect to see any results until leaf out , but I would like to know if it's going to work before buying anymore spray and wasting my time . I think if I have to fight the greenbriars to girdle, I may as well use another method . There aren't that many bigger than your wrist , but a bunch of smaller ones and yes they are in groups . Thanks again everyone .
 

ddd75

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Texasmark":ut0lft69 said:
Locally it's referred to as Black Locust with thorns of 2-3" on mature trees. I have a little and cut the trees and their root shoots down. Across from me is a large pasture and a couple of years ago a helicopter doing airborne spraying doused the field pretty good. Don't know the chemical but being a commercial sprayer one would think that they knew what would work and what wouldn't.

Some of the small (Dime coin size or smaller) trees died. Others look dead but in scraping the bark there is green. The large trees, (5") or so showed damage on the half that was toward the oncoming spray and no damage on the lee side (spraying done in the late summer). My take on the operation was that it was a financial failure, not achieving the desired effect, but the trees were everywhere.

What's funny is that other trees, like Bois-De-Arc in particular, weren't affected in the slightest. So maybe that's a cue as to what was used.


honey and black are 2 different locusts. honey locust haver thorns around 6" long all the way around the tree like every 2". The black locust I have here have almost 0 thorns.. where I have lived before they did have thorns on the younger branches, but those little thing are nothing like a honey locust.. i heard they used to use honey locust thorns as nails.


i've had very good luck with locust groves pushing them all out with a dozer and then after a a couple mowings they don't come back.
 
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snoopdog

snoopdog

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ddd75":2vfcm181 said:
Texasmark":2vfcm181 said:
Locally it's referred to as Black Locust with thorns of 2-3" on mature trees. I have a little and cut the trees and their root shoots down. Across from me is a large pasture and a couple of years ago a helicopter doing airborne spraying doused the field pretty good. Don't know the chemical but being a commercial sprayer one would think that they knew what would work and what wouldn't.

Some of the small (Dime coin size or smaller) trees died. Others look dead but in scraping the bark there is green. The large trees, (5") or so showed damage on the half that was toward the oncoming spray and no damage on the lee side (spraying done in the late summer). My take on the operation was that it was a financial failure, not achieving the desired effect, but the trees were everywhere.

What's funny is that other trees, like Bois-De-Arc in particular, weren't affected in the slightest. So maybe that's a cue as to what was used.


honey and black are 2 different locusts. honey locust haver thorns around 6" long all the way around the tree like every 2". The black locust I have here have almost 0 thorns.. where I have lived before they did have thorns on the younger branches, but those little thing are nothing like a honey locust.. i heard they used to use honey locust thorns as nails.


i've had very good luck with locust groves pushing them all out with a dozer and then after a a couple mowings they don't come back.
Same here , the black locust is what we cut for post in previous years, The honey locust is kin to satan.
 

ddd75

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snoopdog":2d6bzksr said:
ddd75":2d6bzksr said:
Texasmark":2d6bzksr said:
Locally it's referred to as Black Locust with thorns of 2-3" on mature trees. I have a little and cut the trees and their root shoots down. Across from me is a large pasture and a couple of years ago a helicopter doing airborne spraying doused the field pretty good. Don't know the chemical but being a commercial sprayer one would think that they knew what would work and what wouldn't.

Some of the small (Dime coin size or smaller) trees died. Others look dead but in scraping the bark there is green. The large trees, (5") or so showed damage on the half that was toward the oncoming spray and no damage on the lee side (spraying done in the late summer). My take on the operation was that it was a financial failure, not achieving the desired effect, but the trees were everywhere.

What's funny is that other trees, like Bois-De-Arc in particular, weren't affected in the slightest. So maybe that's a cue as to what was used.


honey and black are 2 different locusts. honey locust haver thorns around 6" long all the way around the tree like every 2". The black locust I have here have almost 0 thorns.. where I have lived before they did have thorns on the younger branches, but those little thing are nothing like a honey locust.. i heard they used to use honey locust thorns as nails.


i've had very good luck with locust groves pushing them all out with a dozer and then after a a couple mowings they don't come back.
Same here , the black locust is what we cut for post in previous years, The honey locust is kin to satan.

i have a stack of 130 beautiful big straight locust posts drying out. 8)
 

bird dog

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snoopdog":11if05c0 said:
Sprayed yesterday till I froze out , according to a forestry site which Icant recall that said now was the time . I wouldn't expect to see any results until leaf out , but I would like to know if it's going to work before buying anymore spray and wasting my time . I think if I have to fight the greenbriars to girdle, I may as well use another method . There aren't that many bigger than your wrist , but a bunch of smaller ones and yes they are in groups . Thanks again everyone .

If you are doing everything correctly, than I guarantee it will work and you are not wasting your time. Basal bark spray done correctly is as close to to 100% kill that you will get. The trick is to get all the small trunks and get the spray all the way around them. You won't get 100% kill but what doesn't die, will with a second spraying. If you see some leaves that look healthy, hit them with some foliar spray.
By April, you will know everything you missed.
 

Texasmark

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snoopdog":1ywqp9xp said:
ddd75":1ywqp9xp said:
Texasmark":1ywqp9xp said:
Locally it's referred to as Black Locust with thorns of 2-3" on mature trees. I have a little and cut the trees and their root shoots down. Across from me is a large pasture and a couple of years ago a helicopter doing airborne spraying doused the field pretty good. Don't know the chemical but being a commercial sprayer one would think that they knew what would work and what wouldn't.

Some of the small (Dime coin size or smaller) trees died. Others look dead but in scraping the bark there is green. The large trees, (5") or so showed damage on the half that was toward the oncoming spray and no damage on the lee side (spraying done in the late summer). My take on the operation was that it was a financial failure, not achieving the desired effect, but the trees were everywhere.

What's funny is that other trees, like Bois-De-Arc in particular, weren't affected in the slightest. So maybe that's a cue as to what was used.


honey and black are 2 different locusts. honey locust haver thorns around 6" long all the way around the tree like every 2". The black locust I have here have almost 0 thorns.. where I have lived before they did have thorns on the younger branches, but those little thing are nothing like a honey locust.. i heard they used to use honey locust thorns as nails.


i've had very good luck with locust groves pushing them all out with a dozer and then after a a couple mowings they don't come back.
Same here , the black locust is what we cut for post in previous years, The honey locust is kin to satan.

Well I guess the local name for the tree is in fact Black. On using Locust thorns for nails, I see some merit in that for pioneers trying to make do with nothing.
 

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