• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

question on hoof trimming

Help Support CattleToday:

ugabulldog

Active member
Joined
Nov 22, 2015
Messages
44
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
This is on cows back leg. What looks like need to be done, also looks to be split on top? I have never trimmed hooves before except on goats.I have a squeeze chute I can put her in, but probably needs more than just end nipped with nippers? If I need to tie foot up and trim I am thinking it is probably over my head and def. don't want to get hurt. Could call vet or a farrier based on your recommendations or would you just sell/cull? (she is a nice big cow other than that) Thanks for any advice.

002 by ar ka, on Flickr
 

Bright Raven

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
10,701
Reaction score
2
Location
Kentucky
Best to put her on a table. I have a couple that the vet trimmed a couple years ago. That one looks like she needs it. Unless you have a compelling need to keep her, she might be one you consider culling.
 

Supa Dexta

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
2,111
Reaction score
0
Location
Eastern Canada
If you're not set up to trim yourself, or confident in your ability to do so, send her down the road. A 5 yr old cow shouldnt have a foot like that. Its a pain to deal with her, and a pain to introduce bad feet into your herd, and before long you have a group of them. been there, done that. Good feet is as important as a good bag to me.
 
OP
U

ugabulldog

Active member
Joined
Nov 22, 2015
Messages
44
Reaction score
0
Location
GA
Supa Dexta":10yy9enc said:
If you're not set up to trim yourself, or confident in your ability to do so, send her down the road. A 5 yr old cow shouldnt have a foot like that. Its a pain to deal with her, and a pain to introduce bad feet into your herd, and before long you have a group of them. been there, done that. Good feet is as important as a good bag to me.

I edited my post... She might be older than 5. got her from a sale, but I know what you mean.
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,458
Reaction score
30
Location
Heart of Texas
gizmom":kwqloug4 said:
I would recommend trimming about two inches behind her ears.

http://www.angus.org/performance/footsc ... poster.pdf

The Angus association has a good article on their web site right now talking about the heritable of hoof structure. Bottom line I wouldn't be retaining any heifers out of this cow and bull calves would be steered.

Gizmom
No history on the cow but this can be nutritional as well. A bad case of acidosis will cause this.
 

gizmom

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
3,312
Reaction score
43
Location
Molino Florida
TB
Good point, but looking at the lack of depth in the heel I would lean toward bad hoof structure. And not knowing for sure since she was purchased through a sale barn I stand by my comment of not retaining heifers or Bulls out of her. The only way we are going to get a handle on these foot issues is culling them out of the breeding population.

Gizmom
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
11,662
Reaction score
199
Location
Central Upstate New York
I agree with not propagating bad feet. If she is faultless except for this, she can be a feedlot producer for you. You can lop the long toe off to keep her "comfortable". May need to do it a few times a year, but you can easily to it yourself. First sign of her getting tender footed or lame, you want to be prepared to ship her.
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,901
Reaction score
111
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
Jeanne - Simme Valley":zt1hdyro said:
I agree with not propagating bad feet. If she is faultless except for this, she can be a feedlot producer for you. You can lop the long toe off to keep her "comfortable". May need to do it a few times a year, but you can easily to it yourself. First sign of her getting tender footed or lame, you want to be prepared to ship her.

Yeah its easy enough to do. A good sharp pair of lopping shears works well . just enough to keep her from getting lame until you ship her.
 

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,839
Reaction score
49
Location
Kentucky
callmefence":3gi8cbm7 said:
Jeanne - Simme Valley":3gi8cbm7 said:
I agree with not propagating bad feet. If she is faultless except for this, she can be a feedlot producer for you. You can lop the long toe off to keep her "comfortable". May need to do it a few times a year, but you can easily to it yourself. First sign of her getting tender footed or lame, you want to be prepared to ship her.

Yeah its easy enough to do. A good sharp pair of lopping shears works well . just enough to keep her from getting lame until you ship her.
Funny how methods vary from state to state, and producer to producer. I'd throw a sheet plywood in the bottom of my chute. Id set a chisel on her toe about an inch in, when she quit prancing, I'd smack the crap out of it with a 2 pound shop hammer.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,033
Reaction score
151
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
Bigfoot, I've done it that way.. depending on the breed and how that affects hardness of the hoof, it's darned near impossible. I've found that *typically*, the darker colored hooves are harder

Gizmom, Good poster.. I like a score of 6 on each of those though rather than 5... but I think the guidelines of scoring at a year old are worthless.. I have pretty much never seen a yearling with (seriously) bad hooves.. that shows up after 3 or 4 years. I haven't trimmed a hoof in 10 years and sure don't miss it.. I have a couple 10+ year old cows that could use a small nip (like 1/2" trimmed) but can't be bothered. I also think there are some animals prone to having bad bone structure that prevents the hoof from wearing properly, as well as the opposite, where bad hooves put an excessive strain on the bones, etc, and from there on it's a vicious cycle.


If you get this cow's hooves trimmed, I'd try and make her walk a little more, and definitely avoid penning her for long periods of time
 

gizmom

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
3,312
Reaction score
43
Location
Molino Florida
Nessie

I agree 100% on not being able to identify the hoof issue at a young age. We are sending a first calf heifer along with her calf to the sale barn in a couple of weeks because of bad feet and poor structure. To be honest I don't know how we missed the structure her hind legs are horrible. Jacob was looking at the cattle in the cull pen and her heifer calf is in the pen. The heifer is really nice but we don't want to take a chance on propagating those feet and legs so we're shipping her out. The cow was bred back to Renoun and stuck. Again I don't know how the heck we missed those horrible hind wheels :oops: but we did so we are going to address it.

Your also right about poor structure having an effect on the way the hoof grows. I will also throw in another point that I feel can impact hoof structure. I feel Enviornment plays a part, in our part of the country we tend to have smaller pastures the cattle don't travel as far for forage. We don't have hills or rocky ground to wear the hoof down. In fact we have soft soil in many instances sandy soil so the cow sinks into the soil instead of being on top of it, the ground does not help in wearing the hoof down. So a cow with poor structures hoof issues are amplified due to the enviornment. I have no studies to back this up just some thoughts I've had since we have been addressing poor hoof structure in our herd. We have a cow that is 12 that is getting a little long but at 12 I am not concerned I think hers is more age related. As breeders it is our responsibility to try to eliminated bad feet from the breeding population.

Gizmom
 

boondocks

Well-known member
Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
2,594
Reaction score
0
Location
Upstate NY
gizmom":2sog0nj7 said:
Nessie

I agree 100% on not being able to identify the hoof issue at a young age. We are sending a first calf heifer along with her calf to the sale barn in a couple of weeks because of bad feet and poor structure. To be honest I don't know how we missed the structure her hind legs are horrible. Jacob was looking at the cattle in the cull pen and her heifer calf is in the pen. The heifer is really nice but we don't want to take a chance on propagating those feet and legs so we're shipping her out. The cow was bred back to Renoun and stuck. Again I don't know how the heck we missed those horrible hind wheels :oops: but we did so we are going to address it.

Your also right about poor structure having an effect on the way the hoof grows. I will also throw in another point that I feel can impact hoof structure. I feel Enviornment plays a part, in our part of the country we tend to have smaller pastures the cattle don't travel as far for forage. We don't have hills or rocky ground to wear the hoof down. In fact we have soft soil in many instances sandy soil so the cow sinks into the soil instead of being on top of it, the ground does not help in wearing the hoof down. So a cow with poor structures hoof issues are amplified due to the enviornment. I have no studies to back this up just some thoughts I've had since we have been addressing poor hoof structure in our herd. We have a cow that is 12 that is getting a little long but at 12 I am not concerned I think hers is more age related. As breeders it is our responsibility to try to eliminated bad feet from the breeding population.

Gizmom
Gizmom, any chance you would be willing and able to post a pic of the poor feet/hind legs you are culling on account of? It would very very helpful to newbies like me. I know what a really good one looks like, and I know what a really bad one looks like. It's the in-between that is tough, for me anyway
 

gizmom

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
3,312
Reaction score
43
Location
Molino Florida
Boondocks

I will do my best to get a photo of her before she heads to town. My face is really red over keeping this one this long. I swear I don't know how we missed her bad back wheels long enough to breed her for a second calf.

Gizmom
 

kilroy60

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2015
Messages
291
Reaction score
1
Had a cow that looked similar to this recently. She began to limp around. Loaded her up and took her to sale barn. Can't afford to have cows with bad feet.
 

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,839
Reaction score
49
Location
Kentucky
Serendepatis this thread came up. Checking cows yesterday evening, and I notice a cow not getting around too good. Long front feet. Had never spied it before. Now one hoof wall seems to be separating. Wish I had seen it earlier. Not sure she can be helped. Couldn't even find her this morning.
 

gizmom

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
3,312
Reaction score
43
Location
Molino Florida
The group of cull cows and calves made the trip to town this morning. Between rain, VBS this morning was my first chance to get a photo of the cow were culling for bad back wheels. I took them with my phone so now the best photos.



B24 she is being sent to town along with her heifer calf, really sickle hocked, her calf isn't as bad but not going to keep her as a breeder. I swear I don't know how she managed to stay on the farm, she is actually bred back AI'd to SAV Renoun yep my face is red.



This is the back feet of a commercial cow that has been used as a recip for many years. The boss told me not to dare put another egg in her (she always stuck). He put his foot down and said he wasn't dealing with her bad feet another year. So her last ET calf is weaned she did breed back to the bull and she gets to go to town.



This is a bred heifer, bred AI really nice heifer but crazy as a loon notice she is fixing to bolt as the photo was taken. Keeping one that acts nuts just gets the rest of them stirred up.

We also sent another open and some poor performing calves. I just call that cash flow.

gizmom
 

Latest posts

Top