• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Pecans

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,190
Reaction score
35
Location
Western KY
Here, it's "Major"... originated about 90 miles north of here in the Green River delta... bears heavily, annually, high-quality kernel, excellent scab resistance (USDA has used it extensively in its breeding program - it's the parent of Kanza, Lakota, and others), great pollenizer for protogynous(Type II) varieties. 100+ years after its original selection from the wild, it's still one of the best for the northern/midwestern pecan belt.
#2 for me is "Green River"... which originated in that same 400-acre block of native pecans with Major... bigger nut, bright golden kernel with yellow meat and great flavor.
 

callmefence

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2016
Messages
6,829
Reaction score
32
Location
Fencemans place...central Texas
I like the ones that grow along where Yancy creek runs into the Colorado best.
The ones along burleson creek just west of lampasas are good to if you can get em before the pigs do.
I thinks browns is paying .60 for native pecans right now. That's better money than picking up cans. You get in the right spot better money than chopping cedar... :D
 

backhoeboogie

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2006
Messages
14,952
Reaction score
4
Location
Texas
callmefence":381jwm91 said:
I like the ones that grow along where Yancy creek runs into the Colorado best.
The ones along burleson creek just west of lampasas are good to if you can get em before the pigs do.
I thinks browns is paying .60 for native pecans right now. That's better money than picking up cans. You get in the right spot better money than chopping cedar... :D

38 years ago (or so maybe 37) they were paying 90 cents a pound for natives. I scrounged up a little over 800 pounds in a little over a week. Paid for Christmas with the money.
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,440
Reaction score
10
Location
Heart of Texas
callmefence":52toyina said:
I like the ones that grow along where Yancy creek runs into the Colorado best.
The ones along burleson creek just west of lampasas are good to if you can get em before the pigs do.
I thinks browns is paying .60 for native pecans right now. That's better money than picking up cans. You get in the right spot better money than chopping cedar... :D
Saw some one pound plastic bags of shelled pecans in café a couple weeks ago.....$10.....I about fainted but they were big and beautiful.
 

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,800
Reaction score
12
Location
Kentucky
I have only seen one pecan tree out in the wild here, and thought it was some kind of fluke. I didn't realize they were a native species around here at all.
 

backhoeboogie

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2006
Messages
14,952
Reaction score
4
Location
Texas
TexasBred":3dl5k6ml said:
Saw some one pound plastic bags of shelled pecans in café a couple weeks ago.....$10.....I about fainted but they were big and beautiful.

My nephew in Pecan Plantation gave me two 5 gallon buckets full. Biggest pecans I have ever seen. I've still got some bucket fulls of natives

I need to get to shelling.

Lisa's McCaw loves pecans. I was shelling and giving him pecan halves. She came in from work and saw me do it. Then asked, "Why are you shelling them for him?" So I handed him one of those tough natives. He shelled it himself. I felt pretty stupid.
 

TexasBred

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
30,440
Reaction score
10
Location
Heart of Texas
Use to have one of those big native trees in the front yard when I was a kid. Took a hammer to crack the darn things and then 5 minutes of work to get the little dab of meat out of it but they were sure good.
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,190
Reaction score
35
Location
Western KY
Bigfoot,
While they're not as common here as they are back home in Alabama, there are more pecans here in KY than most folks realize. Many of the best northern/midwestern pecan varieties either originated in KY/southern IN... or are descended from varieties that originated here.
I could point out a bunch of them to you all over the county - and even inside the city limits of Hoptown, there are quite a few... some are 'improved' varieties, some are just 'natives' that make tiny little nuts.

The kids and I planted about 500 2-yr seedlings of Major & Posey pecans in a CRP riparian bufferstrip on the farm back in 2000... with the intent of me coming back and grafting most of them over to improved varieties. I didn't get many grafted, and those ungrafted seedlings are now beginning to bear nuts. Some may turn out to be as good as the named-variety parents... time will tell.
But... the doggone beavers have moved in and have started cutting down some of my biggest pecans - I'd not been down along the creek until modern firearms season, recently ... only to find that the [email protected] orange-toothed flat-tailed rats had cut down and eaten most of about 15-20 pecan trees.
 

Bigfoot

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
12,800
Reaction score
12
Location
Kentucky
Lucky_P":utloj12a said:
Bigfoot,
While they're not as common here as they are back home in Alabama, there are more pecans here in KY than most folks realize. Many of the best northern/midwestern pecan varieties either originated in KY/southern IN... or are descended from varieties that originated here.
I could point out a bunch of them to you all over the county - and even inside the city limits of Hoptown, there are quite a few... some are 'improved' varieties, some are just 'natives' that make tiny little nuts.

The kids and I planted about 500 2-yr seedlings of Major & Posey pecans in a CRP riparian bufferstrip on the farm back in 2000... with the intent of me coming back and grafting most of them over to improved varieties. I didn't get many grafted, and those ungrafted seedlings are now beginning to bear nuts. Some may turn out to be as good as the named-variety parents... time will tell.
But... the doggone beavers have moved in and have started cutting down some of my biggest pecans - I'd not been down along the creek until modern firearms season, recently ... only to find that the [email protected] orange-toothed flat-tailed rats had cut down and eaten most of about 15-20 pecan trees.

I had no idea your intrest branched over in to horticulture. I will have to pay more attention. The only one I've noticed was out near pilot rock.
 

jedstivers

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
5,787
Reaction score
1
Location
Marianna Arkansas (East Central)
backhoeboogie":bncwql43 said:
callmefence":bncwql43 said:
I like the ones that grow along where Yancy creek runs into the Colorado best.
The ones along burleson creek just west of lampasas are good to if you can get em before the pigs do.
I thinks browns is paying .60 for native pecans right now. That's better money than picking up cans. You get in the right spot better money than chopping cedar... :D

38 years ago (or so maybe 37) they were paying 90 cents a pound for natives. I scrounged up a little over 800 pounds in a little over a week. Paid for Christmas with the money.
Paying .90 and 1.00 here.
Small natives .90 and big nice Stuart's 1.00.
 

M-5

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2015
Messages
7,338
Reaction score
0
Location
AT the FLORIDA STATE line checking papers
Off year for my trees , all are what we call seedlings I got about a dozen trees in my yard some are near 100 yrs old i guess . one neighbor is 90 and said the 4 big trees have been that size his whole life . the biggest tree was struck by lightning about 10 yrs ago pealed the bark off to the ground but it healed over and is only one that makes every yr. They are smaller than they used to be tho. And they are called peacaaaaans
 

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,310
Reaction score
22
Location
Cleveland Tx
pronounced...'pacahn'.
Lots of those little hard nubbin type pecan trees here--all up and down the river. The shell is thick and mostly used to test diamonds for hardness. I've killed hundreds of them--and pignut hickory trees, but every spring, new ones pop up.

When I lived out west, some of the best pecans I ever ate came from trees growing along the Concho Rivers. Hundreds of them, but not nearly as many as the old folks said were on those rivers before the big flood of 1936 washed hundreds of the old trees away
 

JMJ Farms

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4,811
Reaction score
14
Location
Middle Georgia
Here we have seedlings, paper shells, and Stuart's. That's what we call them anyway. I like them all. Pronounced 'pea-can'. Not 'pea-cahn ' or 'pu-can' or 'pu-cahn' :hide: :lol:
 

greybeard

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Messages
19,310
Reaction score
22
Location
Cleveland Tx
peecan
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,190
Reaction score
35
Location
Western KY
I pronounce it pea(really, more like the short 'i' sound)-cahn, emphasis on second syllable. Always have, always will, as have all my people.
Pee-can will not cross my lips.
 
Top