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dun

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Switch grass is about the easiest, after crabgrass to get established. Big and little blue take forever to get started.
Cool season if you want to avoid the usual fescue/brome would be Reed Canary Grass, but it isn;t really a native to the US. The various panecums just don;t really get the forage mass to do much good.
Check with your local NRCS or Extension service office, they would be the best source of information for your particular area.
 

dun

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Santas and Duhram Reds":9lmw1wm8 said:
What do you know about Gama grass or Indian grass?

Indian grass is almost as hard to get established at big or little blue. Pretty envasive since it will eventully srowd out the other WSGs. Gama is a little easier to establish but after a copule of years you can hardly walk across a field of it let alone drive. It has large rhyzomes that grow across the surface and makes a really rough surface. If cut early enough it has good palatability but allowed to get very mature the cows don;t care for it. Friend of mine planted some a few years ago and now just uses it strictly as grazing because of the roughness of the surface.
 

dun

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Santas and Duhram Reds":3ee1sggh said:
So if all I am going to do is graze it, it will be fine?

Right, but you have to balance it's growth with the stocking rate. When it gets stemmy the cows like it about as much as mature cane. I also think that grazing it will probably help it to persist. Just the natural action of the hoofs breaking those long surface rhyzoms. But that's just my opinion.
 

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