Medics

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KNERSIE

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Anyone with medics experience that can relay their feelings on where it might or might not work? Any other comments appreciated.
 

dun

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The only medic I'm familiar with is black medic (hop clover). Grows wild, cows love it. Around here they refer to it as poor mans alfalfa. Usually finishes growing about the time the lespedeza gets going.
 

novatech

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Burr Medic grows wild here. It grows better if the existing forage is short. Medics, like clover, has to have a neutral Ph. In order for it to produce N the phosphorus has to be in the soil and of course the microbes.
Our county agent says the medic is every bit as good as clover. Just watch for bloat.
 

Txwalt

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http://www.pogueagri.com/Devine_Little_Burr_Medic.aspx

I spread a bunch of this devine medic out last year. I just broadcasted it in non-pasture areas. I wish I could give you a decent report. With the drought conditions here in Texas it didn't have much of a chance. The only reason I posted it is because I think your climate is pretty close to mine. I did notice it coming up when we received a little bit of rain so I know the seed was good. Maybe if we get some rain this fall I'll see how much of it survived.

Walt
 
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KNERSIE

KNERSIE

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novatech":3hb3sefv said:
Burr Medic grows wild here. It grows better if the existing forage is short. Medics, like clover, has to have a neutral Ph. In order for it to produce N the phosphorus has to be in the soil and of course the microbes.
Our county agent says the medic is every bit as good as clover. Just watch for bloat.

John, one of the fields where I plan to plant medics next year has some volunteer medics there already, would it be a fair assumption that since there is volunteer medics the pasture mixture of medics would also work there?
 

novatech

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KNERSIE":1fpdclre said:
novatech":1fpdclre said:
Burr Medic grows wild here. It grows better if the existing forage is short. Medics, like clover, has to have a neutral Ph. In order for it to produce N the phosphorus has to be in the soil and of course the microbes.
Our county agent says the medic is every bit as good as clover. Just watch for bloat.

John, one of the fields where I plan to plant medics next year has some volunteer medics there already, would it be a fair assumption that since there is volunteer medics the pasture mixture of medics would also work there?
They will work there but just seeing the grow is not enough. Growing and doing well are two different things.
My pastures are a perfect example. I have dug some of it up at different stages. I did not find any nodules present. The following year I applied phosphate as recommended by soil tests. I dug it up and the nodules were present, thus producing much more protein and putting more N back into the soil as well as more protein into the forage.
The microbes should already be present in your soil but the addition of more would be good insurance.
 
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