Lute timing

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Nesikep

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My floozy heifer Zima is in heat today, I did have them separated from the bull but the whole herd decided to ruin my plans and I ain't getting her out.. is lute only given ~21 days after they're suspect of being bred or can it (or anything else?) be given the day of, or day after? She's just shy of 10 months so despite she's a tank, I do want to wait on her.
Thankfully she's weaned well enough she's not going back to nursing
IMG_20220906_111335_605.jpg
 
My floozy heifer Zima is in heat today, I did have them separated from the bull but the whole herd decided to ruin my plans and I ain't getting her out.. is lute only given ~21 days after they're suspect of being bred or can it (or anything else?) be given the day of, or day after? She's just shy of 10 months so despite she's a tank, I do want to wait on her.
Thankfully she's weaned well enough she's not going back to nursing
View attachment 21435
DO NOT GIVE HER LUTE WITH IN A WEEK OF SUSPECTED BREEDING. Lute will protect a pregnancy under 7 days old. I'd wait until 45-60days after you think she got bred. Still plenty early for the lute to work, but far enough along that it work.
 
thanks.. wish there was just a morning after pill for her! She'll be going to a friends place in about 2 weeks so I'll have to instruct them to lute her
 
Yeh as Buck suggested better early, I'd shoot for 14 days. You have to have a corpus luteum which develops from the site on the ovary where they ovulated. The PG breaks down the CL and they come back on heat. It is best done early before anything really starts developing and gets a hold on in there. The less material there the better.

Ken
 
Absolutely. 21 days after breeding is minimum. Also, my vet instructed me to add dexamethasone anytime the pregnancy is 5 months along or further. Beautiful cattle and scenery there.
Yes. But. Depending on the size and age of the heifer, aborting a calf at 5 months can sometimes be too far along and cause problems. Lost a nice calf years ago, trying to abort. If I knew then what I know now, I would have kept her in the barn and watched her, just like I do when my heifers are calving.
 
Agree with my colleagues Buck & Ken... there is no need to wait beyond 10 days or so...
Not disagreeing, just clarifying; ten days after suspected heat or ten days after guaranteed no exposure?
In this situation if she possibly stuck, but not sure and you don't get her out of there for a couple weeks. Do you lute her as soon as you move her or wait an additional 10 days to be safe?
 
I'll probably still have her in 14 days, so I should be able to do it.. marked and highlighted the calendar, now all I have to do is remember to look at the calendar and remember what day today is
 
Not disagreeing, just clarifying; ten days after suspected heat or ten days after guaranteed no exposure?
In this situation if she possibly stuck, but not sure and you don't get her out of there for a couple weeks. Do you lute her as soon as you move her or wait an additional 10 days to be safe?
Why not do both? In reality if you haven't been watching her and have no idea when she was cycling then I would wait the 10 days after exposure as she may have been bred the day before you got her out but again, why not do both PG is cheap.

Ken
 
Why not do both? In reality if you haven't been watching her and have no idea when she was cycling then I would wait the 10 days after exposure as she may have been bred the day before you got her out but again, why not do both PG is cheap.

Ken
You can do both or will two doses of lute that close together? How would that affect their heat cycles?
 
You can do both or will two doses of lute that close together? How would that affect their heat cycles?
That's no problem, they have a shortened cycle with the PG but are back to normal on the next cycle. The good thing about PG's is they don't really interfere with things, they just break down the corpus luteum which is secreting progesterone which is inhibiting the development of follicles. In the non pregnant cow it breaks down naturally and a follicle develops and they come in season.

Ken
 

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