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Long hooves

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BigBear56

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I noticed tonight that the hooves on a group of cows are getting long and curling towards the center (not up). This group gets a 2 gal bucket of sweet feed twice a day (the cheap stuff from Rural King) to keep them coming into the corral. There’s only 3 head in this group. 2 bred heifers and 1 8 year old all due to calves in January. They have free choice mineral. They’ve been on this ration for 6 months. Can that sweet feed be causing this? I also was feeding this group 2 5 gal buckets of wet brewers grain a day over the summer when we couldnt get it all fed before it got rancid. Wondering what the cause is and where to go from here.
 

TexasBred

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Doubt its the feed. Brewers grain has almost no starches and cheap sweet feed from Rural King probably has very little as well. IF it contains no cottonseed hulls for roughage you might consider changing to one.
 

Hpacres440p

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Mine did that also when we had a stretch of wet weather-not enough to wear down. Now the tips are self-trimming-one of my heavies was a little tender-footed for about a week. I cut out most feed for the past two weeks also, just Once a week about 3 lbs each, just to reduce the extra unneeded calories to help with slowing hoof growth.
 

Brute 23

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Generally when I have seen hooves growing long it's due to the cow not walking properly on her feet. I have two middle aged cows going to town for that reason in a couple weeks.

You might post a pic to get specific advice to the situation.
 

SBMF 2015

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We had a Charolais bull pass that bad curly toe trait on very effectively. Culled ALL his daughters over a two year period.
If I remember right it takes a little age before it shows up.
 

WFfarm

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We had a couple angus we bought that had long hooves and ridges across the hooves. Vet said it was flounder from too much grain. We were able to get a friend that has a rig for trimming dairy cows do all our older cows last spring. He said they weren't that bad and beef cows should naturally wear then down being on pasture and moving around. Dairy farms around us are on a schedule to have their cows hooves trimmed every 6 months.
 

Hpacres440p

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Mine did that also when we had a stretch of wet weather-not enough to wear down. Now the tips are self-trimming-one of my heavies was a little tender-footed for about a week. I cut out most feed for the past two weeks also, just Once a week about 3 lbs each, just to reduce the extra unneeded calories to help with slowing hoof growth.
Well, I spoke too soon-8 month bred heaviest cow is lame on front because one toe tip is trying to self-trim (tear horizontally). Looks as comfortable as a stubbed toe, but I’m going to treat with benign neglect for now....
 
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Hpacres440p

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So this is how my cows’ toes end up
self-trimming. A bit tender with the crack/tear stage, but then they seem to do ok. I’m sure extra calf weight isn’t helping. Seems to break off one half at a time
 

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4hfarms

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We do long narrow pads for them. Water on one end and food/minerals on the other. Seems they get taken care of naturally. Depending on the grass in the field when we arrive. Usually between 25-50 ft wide and run it to the next pasture fence, maybe a couple hundred yards. Make them walk, all this nutrition has to go somewhere...
 

Brute 23

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So this is how my cows’ toes end up
self-trimming. A bit tender with the crack/tear stage, but then they seem to do ok. I’m sure extra calf weight isn’t helping. Seems to break off one half at a time
I'm not sure the age on that cow but I see those long toes when cows have that steep slope in their footing. I've seen that hoof on the backside wear down enough that it starts hitting meat. You might get her in a squeeze chute and check if she has been limping.

In my experience, her days are numbered.
 

Hpacres440p

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I'm not sure the age on that cow but I see those long toes when cows have that steep slope in their footing. I've seen that hoof on the backside wear down enough that it starts hitting meat. You might get her in a squeeze chute and check if she has been limping.

In my experience, her days are numbered.
She is limping at times, 8 mo bred so waiting for her to calve and wean. As I said, she’s from a commercial beef herd at a university, so she may be more of a “terminal” type. Her feet actually looked pretty good until we got about a month of mud, and she kept gaining weight. She is bigger frame than I want (won’t fit in the chute anymore), so we’ll be doing a hard look when this calf is on the ground. Thanks for the input
 

Hpacres440p

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I'm not sure the age on that cow but I see those long toes when cows have that steep slope in their footing. I've seen that hoof on the backside wear down enough that it starts hitting meat. You might get her in a squeeze chute and check if she has been limping.

In my experience, her days are numbered.
This was about 2 months ago so you can see her structure
 

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Hpacres440p

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Update on front hooves after toes self-trimmed. I’m ok with the heel height...walking much more on her toes. Front foot.
 

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ita47

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It's been my experience that some long toe foot issues are results of cuts or injuries to the hoof not something genetic. I have taken some of my cows to the vet to get hoofs trimmed and the vet usually points out the injured area and explained that the injury can cause the cow to walk on the hoof differently which can lead to long toes. If that is the cause once the injured area is healed and the toe is trimmed that should be the end of it. But there are also cows that have bad feet that do pass that on genetically. Those cattle should be culled. I am glad to see many of the breeds adding foot score EPD's.
 

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