Lime

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klm3030

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I have 200 acres of thin pasture that has not been soil tested and Limed in at least 20 years, so I'm guessing will need a lot. What is the normal way of sharing the cost of Lime between landlord and renter? I realize this is a loaded question but would like some input. I am located in north central Missouri.
 

chaded

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The normal way of sharing cost is whatever you discussed beforehand. Depending on the situation, if they havent limed it in 20 years they probably arent going to now. Also, if you do get someone to purchase lime i would expect the lease to price to go up.
 

sstterry

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I've always been told to put on two ton per acre max. If the tests call for more do two ton this year, wait a year or two, do two more or whatever is needed.
As I recall, you can double that if you work it into the soil. But I can't say for certain without looking it up.
 

kenny thomas

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I have 200 acres of thin pasture that has not been soil tested and Limed in at least 20 years, so I'm guessing will need a lot. What is the normal way of sharing the cost of Lime between landlord and renter? I realize this is a loaded question but would like some input. I am located in north central Missouri.
If you can negotiate a lease of 5 years plus it might be ok to lime it yourself. I would ask for 8-10 years because as soon as you get the grass going good they will either go up on the price or lease to someone else.
 

cfpinz

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If you can negotiate a lease of 5 years plus it might be ok to lime it yourself. I would ask for 8-10 years because as soon as you get the grass going good they will either go up on the price or lease to someone else.
You must deal with the same people I do!
 

coachg

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It won’t hurt to ask ! As everyone has said I would definitely get an agreement of 6 or more years . Lime is not an overnight cure so it’ll take 2-3 to see a difference. Definitely get a soil test . We bought a farm that was neglected the last years the previous owner had it . First thing we did was soil test . Lime , fertilize, spray herbicides for briars and thistle. That has been our formula .
 

southalberta

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It won’t hurt to ask ! As everyone has said I would definitely get an agreement of 6 or more years . Lime is not an overnight cure so it’ll take 2-3 to see a difference. Definitely get a soil test . We bought a farm that was neglected the last years the previous owner had it . First thing we did was soil test . Lime , fertilize, spray herbicides for briars and thistle. That has been our formula .
Dumb question likely. What does lime
Do?
 

504RP

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7 years ago I heard a guy looking for somebody to bale hay off a 60 acre field. Said he gets his field clean and I get the hay off of it.

I baled it. Hay was poor quality. Got some soil samples tested. Went over what the land needed and the cost of doing it with the owner. He agreed to a signed 5 year lease drawn up by a lawyer.

Had 4 semi loads of lime delivered. Rented a lime buggy, spread it myself. Had four semi loads of litter spread on it. Replaced 1/4 mile of fence. Have put out commerical fertilizer a few times since. And spray it. Just put cow's on it in the summer and graze it.

Second year into the lease the land owner lets his son-in-law and daughter fence off 4 acares in the middle of the place and build a shop building with living quarters. They ride 4 wheelers across it frequently killing the grass on the paths they make across the field.

They they put a stud horse and mare to raise horse's on the lease. Had a colt this year and plan on having another next year.

They bilt a shooting range and was asked by the son in law today if i could move my mineral feeder some where else a way from where the shooting range is. Dropping hints that cows could possibly get shot. While telling the son in law yes I can move it at the same time trying to keep from losing my cool and doing something I would regret latter.

The land owner and I get along good. The son in law can't wait until the father in law ( owner ) dies so that he can inherit the place.

The property is just about back to how i found it fertility wise and lacking in other nutrients I am guessing. It's not producing quality forage like it's capable of because it's time to put more money in it again.

That's not going to happen with me ever again with this land owner or any other. I learned my lesson from this experience.

Hope things work out better for you. I think the son in law is going to learn what his father in law already knew when he signed the lease with me. He had a pretty good deal. If you want to maintain 60 acres of pasture it cost a lot of money just to keep it from growing up.

Unless the son in law learns how to treat others. I don't think his horse operation is going to net him any profit. May not even be able to see his new colts in a pasture full of weeds 6 foot or higher.
 

Raycountry

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I just got a price on lime at 300 a ton. I farm the owners land, I get out it what I put into it. I'm improving his land in exchange for forage I get from it.
I cannot afford to do everything perfectly so, I put it on at 1/2 ton an acre and do a soil test every 3 years.
If tomorrow he says no more, no big deal, technically I would have gotten more out it, then I put into it considering the cost of alfalfa.

I would have gotten more
 

M.Magis

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I just got a price on lime at 300 a ton. I farm the owners land, I get out it what I put into it. I'm improving his land in exchange for forage I get from it.
I cannot afford to do everything perfectly so, I put it on at 1/2 ton an acre and do a soil test every 3 years.
If tomorrow he says no more, no big deal, technically I would have gotten more out it, then I put into it considering the cost of alfalfa.

I would have gotten more
$300 a ton?
That's 10x what is is around these parts.
 

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