• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

How to turn brewers grain into silage?

BK9954

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
1,370
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
How do you turn brewers grain into silage to prolonge storage life? Is it feasable to turn steers on this in a few months for a profit if the grain is free?
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,183
Reaction score
29
Location
Western KY
An ensiled product would have a relatively high carbohydrate content that would be fermented, producing organic acids that 'preserve' the product by lowering pH into a range that is not conducive to the growth of spoilage bacteria/fungi.
By virtue of the fact that most of the carbohydrate in brewer's grains has already been removed in the alcohol fermentation process, they no longer qualify as a substrate to be 'turned into silage'.

Drying will certainly preserve feed quality, but studies have also shown that distiller's grains can be stored - even at relatively high moisture levels, for fairly long periods, with minimal degradation of feed value - they'll look like lleh and stink to high heavens, but the cows will still eat them, and the nutrients are largely still there, and mycotoxins have not been shown to be a problem.
Lots of info out there; here's one for starters: http://www.beefmagazine.com/markets/fee ... ers-grains
 

BK9954

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
1,370
Reaction score
0
Location
Central Texas
Lucky_P":1t4ml7pp said:
An ensiled product would have a relatively high carbohydrate content that would be fermented, producing organic acids that 'preserve' the product by lowering pH into a range that is not conducive to the growth of spoilage bacteria/fungi.
By virtue of the fact that most of the carbohydrate in brewer's grains has already been removed in the alcohol fermentation process, they no longer qualify as a substrate to be 'turned into silage'.

Drying will certainly preserve feed quality, but studies have also shown that distiller's grains can be stored - even at relatively high moisture levels, for fairly long periods, with minimal degradation of feed value - they'll look like lleh and stink to high heavens, but the cows will still eat them, and the nutrients are largely still there, and mycotoxins have not been shown to be a problem.
Lots of info out there; here's one for starters: http://www.beefmagazine.com/markets/fee ... ers-grains
By drying it out in the sun, would this prevent mold? My concern is once opened it will grow mold fairly quickly. I dont want to abort calves by having moldy grain but want the benefit of reduced feed cost. I am soliciting all of the microbrewerys in my area. It will be more feed then I can handle or I need to buy more cattle. 100 acres only holds so many. Running 29 head max but if feed is cheap or free could start a calf/feed out type situation. Might be profitable.
 

Lucky_P

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2009
Messages
3,183
Reaction score
29
Location
Western KY
I've spent nearly 40 years in veterinary medicine - and most of that time in diagnostic pathology - and while 'mycotic abortions' do occur, I've never seen one. Ever. It's not common enough that I'd worry about it.

We've been feeding dry distiller's grain product for about 4-5 years...little to no spoilage, even when stored form months at at time. Prior to that, we fed some 'modified' distiller's grains for several years - a 50% moisture product, and yes, it molded fairly quickly - and in some cases, would take on a pretty good stink - but the cows never refused it, and I never saw any evidence that it caused any problems.
Read the article I linked.
 

Latest posts

Top