How to find hydraulic flow rate on a tractor?

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SALTBRANCH2

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I have searched the net with no luck. I am sure its an easy find but I am not finding it. I am looking at post drivers and I am trying to find the flow rate @ __ PSI on a MF 230 and a CASE 485. Tractor data has the Case 485 @ 15.9 gpm but no PSI listed. The MF230 I cant find anything about the hydraulic ratings. So does anyone know where to look and find this info?
 

Nesikep

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MOST tractors will have around 2500 PSI... Tractordata.com has information for most tractors, but I see it's missing for the 230...

http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractor ... n-255.html for the 255

This one has the same specs as the 255, and is in the same power range, I'd think the 230 would have the same setup as well at 10GPM, 2300 psi
http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractor ... n-235.html

the 485 seems to have it beat in hydraulics, the IH's were typically well endowed in that area
http://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractor ... h-485.html
 
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SALTBRANCH2

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Thanks Nesikep. I did not think about looking at other models in the same power range.
 

Nesikep

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I know that both masseys and IH's kept the same platform for years, and through many models and power ranges.. transmissions on masseys are pretty much the same from the 0 series at least through the 200 series.. some minor changes like wet/dry brake setups.. IH's had the same transmissions in the 40-80hp range in the 1970's and 80's.. tractors got a little smaller/shorter with smaller wheels and 3 cylinder instead of 4 cylinder engines, but the rest of it really didn't change all that much. This means the smaller tractors have darned near indestructible transmissions but they get a little more fragile on some of the bigger ones.. Massey 185's were known to be a little weak because of the power they put down and big huge rear tires and weights that provided traction
 

wbvs58

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Would you get it by say measuring the cylinder diameters on a loader and timing them to travel a certain distance and calculating from there????????? I guess a lot easier to look it up.

Ken
 

Texasmark

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wbvs58":3hrl09g5 said:
Would you get it by say measuring the cylinder diameters on a loader and timing them to travel a certain distance and calculating from there????????? I guess a lot easier to look it up.

Ken

That'll give you a "dynamic" rate which is what you really need to know anyway for the cylinders in question.
 

Atimm693

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On a hydraulic post driver, the springs are what actually do the pounding. Hydraulics are only needed to raise the driver, most any tractor will have plenty of pressure and flow for that.

It will always work the best if you install a 1" hose or larger on the return, and dump it straight into the fill cap of the transmission. Quick connects will not flow enough to make it drop hard and fast.

You could calculate the volume of the cylinder (pi*r^2*length), convert it to gallons, and then see how long it takes to extend. R is the cylinder bore divided by two. Do the test with the cylinder extending outward.
 

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