Horn Weights?

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NewMoo

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I have one jersey cow with horns. She is in with a mixed her of beef cattle— all polled. I bought her thinking I’d buy bottle calves when she calves and put them on her then sell them.
She is a bit naughty. She’s been going after some of the babies and heifers trying to hook them. Her horns are sawn off and blunt, but she could still do some damage. Would horn weights help lower them to an angle that wouldn’t be as dangerous?

She’s basically a big goofball who gets a little too rowdy, but I think my brother has given her two strikes and I am going to have to do something. Dehorning is a last resort. Advice? Also, I’d really like to keep her to see my experiment through unless she hurts one of the other animals or me. 😬BEB58089-10FB-4D82-83FF-DB71DF7BE4AD.jpeg
 
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NewMoo

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Thank y’all! You should have seen her when I bought her! Nothing but skin and bones.
 

Son of Butch

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How long have you had her?
I'm thinking she might be going through a phase of establishing pecking order in her new home. (Or she could just be a jerk) lol :)
 
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SBMF 2015

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Weights would still work, just need heavier ones. 1 1/2lbs.
or you could slope her horns. Cut the tips on an angle and the horns will grow to the longest point.
 

farmerjan

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I can tell you from years of experience that she will only get more aggressive with the horns. I have had many dairy animals with horns, once they find they can use them, they will continue. I had a 5 year old that never used her horns, then one day she swung her head at a heifer that was about 600 lbs and caught her and then when she realized she could clear the area whenever she wanted, that was it. Took them off that fall when the flies weren't as bad.
She was the most surprised animal when she tried to do it again and there were no horns there to hook with. And it is not just having the tips to hook with, even had one with horns that had been sawed off young, and they were just 4 inch short hard nubs on her head and she could still batter at an animal with them.
I always loved horns on an animal, but it just isn't good when in mixed company.
Plus, if you put calves on her, and she takes a dislike to one, then she will hurt it with the horns. Not all are as wonderful as the jersey that @MurraysMutts bought and brought home and turned into such a good nurse cow for him.
 

Ky hills

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@farmerjan is telling it right, once they learn to use their horns they are trouble. I definitely don’t would not want another nurse cow with horns. That is dangerous for both the calves and the person trying to get them on her. Bought an Ayrshire cow, years ago with a healthy set of horns. Pretty gentle cow, but she knew exactly how to use her horns and calves learned quick to be afraid of her. It got to dangerous for me to try to tie her.
 

Ky hills

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We have a 4 year old longhorn cow that so far hasn’t caused any trouble. She’s one of the smallest cows, but is kind of like having a guard animal in the field as she will go and checkout any new or different situations especially pertaining to calves even other than her own. I’m hoping she doesn’t change in demeanor in regards to her interaction with other cattle. If she does then we will have to make other arrangements for her.
 

farmerjan

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I also have one smallish longhorn that runs with the nurse cows and first calf heifers. She has a beautiful set of horns. I have seen her go head to head...skull to skull.... with a few in pushing matches as she was growing up, but never seen her use the horns on another animal. She will shake her head if someone gets in her space, and she is one he// of a watch dog in the field as she does not tolerate dogs and such around the calves. She has her 2nd calf on her and is very good with the calves in general. The other cows respect her but they do not shy away so I believe that she is not aggressive with the horns.
If she were to use them, she would be hamburger and the horns would be on my wall in a heartbeat. I like that she is protective of the calves with dogs, and I am assuming coyotes as we have them around. I hope that she continues to be the "watch cow" and the guard cow in the field.
 

SBMF 2015

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It will be a lot faster and easier just to whack the horns off. It is called an "attitude adjustment".
Used to load semis at the sale barn. Had one truck driver that carried a base ball bat in the truck just for that purpose. He wasn't about to have any market cows punch holes in his fiberglass top.
 
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NewMoo

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She sure looks good now.
Whens she due?
How many calves are ya gonna put on her?
How long have you had her?
I'm thinking she might be going through a phase of establishing pecking order in her new home. (Or she could just be a jerk) lol :)
I’ve had her since early April. I want to believe she is more playful than intentional in her behavior.

As for pecking order, she is definitely trying to find her place as a single jersey in a herd of beef cattle. Right now, her social skills are somewhere between class clown and three year old.

She’s due in January.
 

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