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High tensile temporary fence.

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Douglas

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Has anyone attempted to utilize high tensile for temporary cross fencing. I have a couple 10 acre fields that are long and narrow. The easiest way to cross fence is of course across the narrow span and that works out best for providing water. I rotate from year to year which field I mow for hay so I need to be able to remove the cross fence for moving, fertilizing, spraying etc. I also cross fence winter annuals that will be shallow cultivated in the summer to start my summer crabgrass. How about two permanent posts down the side opposite the border fence. Pull high tensile across and connect over the top of the post with a wrap around insulator. Then with the ability to tighten the fence I would only need a few t-posts to keep it at the right height. It would stand up much better to the occasional passing deer or small calf and could be used for creep grazing. I currently use steel wire and fiberglass posts.

Then when done pull the high tensile down the long side of the permanent border fence and attach to offset insulators spread out to hold it off the ground. I would probably need a post to again attach the wrap around insulator over. I know I would have to be careful when moving the fence to keep it from coiling up, but I think if I have a couple people helping it could be done. I would leave it in place for about 6-8 months at a time. What do you think?
 

Stocker Steve

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Good question. Poly twine, aluminum wire, and wood posts are not always the best solutions. My suggestions are:

- Put in tee post "speed brace" corners. They sell speed braces out of Mineral Point, WS.. They claim you can put in a corner in 5 minutes, but the wife has been slowing down the last couple years... 8)
- Roll the high tensile wire up on a 55 gallon drum when you move next year.
 

bvfd129

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I would just put up an electric fence. The most expensive thing is the electric fence box with a solar panel, which will probably run you $200 - $300 dollars. You can use the high tensile barbed wire and metal electric fence posts that can be driven in the ground with a hammer with the yellow insulators . This fence can be put up and taken down in probably an hour tops and it will definitely hold any size cattle.

Good Luck
 

iowafarmer

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stick to steel wire, and use the little re-rod poles with black dare insulators, the yellow ones are not near as good and come off easier, and jsut stretch it tight
high tensile wire is the shiits to tie, bend, and plainn out work with, its especially hard to roll up and keep nice and not end up with a worthless pile of wire for next year.
 

rusty

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Sounds like you have a good game plan.
Not trying to hijack your thread but has anyone used treated landscape timbers for posts?If so how do they hold up?Reason for ?'s is I priced them for a little over 3 bucks and metal t-posts are over $4.I pulled over two miles of wire over the weekend and need to go back and put posts in.Thanks for any help on this and like I said not trying to hijack just figured wasn't any reason in starting a new one.
 

c farmer

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I hve used landscape timbers for fencing and they will last a long time, i have some in for 20 years. The only problem is that I use a post pounder and if you get a post with a knot in it sometimes it would shear the pole off.
 

S B Knap

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I think you have it figured out. If you have solid wood post on both side you will not need more than rebar or fiberglass posts in the middle. I would wire the insulator in and leave it. Then wire the insulator to the end posts as needed so you dont ever change the length of the wire. It will be easier to move than you think.
 

rusty

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c farmer":2w9ktrxr said:
I hve used landscape timbers for fencing and they will last a long time, i have some in for 20 years. The only problem is that I use a post pounder and if you get a post with a knot in it sometimes it would shear the pole off.

hayray":2w9ktrxr said:
I have landscape timbers that have been in for around a dozen years now.

Thanks guys i'll be planting some as soon as it dries up.
 
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Douglas

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S B Knap":3g0b52ma said:
I think you have it figured out. If you have solid wood post on both side you will not need more than rebar or fiberglass posts in the middle. I would wire the insulator in and leave it. Then wire the insulator to the end posts as needed so you dont ever change the length of the wire. It will be easier to move than you think.

I think you were responding to the origional post. If so explain this a little further. "I would wire the insulator in and leave it." Not sure what you mean. Thanks
 
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I use high-tensile and all fiberglass posts. The end/corner posts called mule post from Geotek I use have an auger bit on the bottom so that you can turn them in and then remove them when you want to make a change or add an opening in the fence etc. In the middle I use fiber glass posts. I've been able to modify my fences with these and there is no hole digging. They are expensive in the beginning, but having a nice short-free fence that can be changed around when needed is worth it to me.
 

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