High set tail head

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Ky hills

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Have a question about possible issues resulting from a high tail head. Have a bull calf that he has a really high set tail. I think I remember hearing something about that it could result in calving issues or prolapse in cows. So I am wondering if and it's a big if to start with if that calf was used as a bull would that affect the calving of his progeny and if it would be much of an issue in daughters? Not really interested in keeping that individual but it just got me to thinking about the tail set as I have seen several bulls like that recently.
 

ALACOWMAN

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Don't think it's a prolapse issue.. If the pins are tilted higher than the hooks causing the tail head problem, it can be a calving issue.the calf will move upward tward the pelvic opening "get locked"and inhibit its presentation...they will also crap right into their Yoo-hoo and cause infections, making them breed later or effecting their breeding back altogether..
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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That article pointed out some excellent points:
"A cow or heifer needs to be feminine, with a graceful, slender head and neck and a long body. The long body gives her more room to carry a calf when she’s pregnant. You also want good depth and width of ribcage and body, to give her more room to handle a large quantity of forage. She should not be narrow or shallow. She needs good muscling, without being too heavy-set. The overly muscled female is usually not as fertile and maternally productive as a more feminine individual."

These are traits that the show ring and EVERY cattle producer should be striving for. But, his point about Denver show winners wanting high tail heads made me look at the date of this article. January 19, 2009
High tail heads were a fad at one time. Not necessarily high on the animal as much as they peaked the tail hair so the animal had a high "sweep" look from shoulder back to tail head.
UGLY. Always has been and definitely not acceptable in the show ring now.
Other than that, this was a good article.
 

Bright Raven

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":310asjce said:
That article pointed out some excellent points:
"A cow or heifer needs to be feminine, with a graceful, slender head and neck and a long body. The long body gives her more room to carry a calf when she’s pregnant. You also want good depth and width of ribcage and body, to give her more room to handle a large quantity of forage. She should not be narrow or shallow. She needs good muscling, without being too heavy-set. The overly muscled female is usually not as fertile and maternally productive as a more feminine individual."

These are traits that the show ring and EVERY cattle producer should be striving for. But, his point about Denver show winners wanting high tail heads made me look at the date of this article. January 19, 2009
High tail heads were a fad at one time. Not necessarily high on the animal as much as they peaked the tail hair so the animal had a high "sweep" look from shoulder back to tail head.
UGLY. Always has been and definitely not acceptable in the show ring now.
Other than that, this was a good article.

Jeanne, I still hear some folks holding on to the concept of a slightly higher tail head. I think they are stuck in that period when it was popular.
 

ALACOWMAN

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":z00tmq4w said:
That article pointed out some excellent points:
"A cow or heifer needs to be feminine, with a graceful, slender head and neck and a long body. The long body gives her more room to carry a calf when she’s pregnant. You also want good depth and width of ribcage and body, to give her more room to handle a large quantity of forage. She should not be narrow or shallow. She needs good muscling, without being too heavy-set. The overly muscled female is usually not as fertile and maternally productive as a more feminine individual."

These are traits that the show ring and EVERY cattle producer should be striving for. But, his point about Denver show winners wanting high tail heads made me look at the date of this article. January 19, 2009
High tail heads were a fad at one time. Not necessarily high on the animal as much as they peaked the tail hair so the animal had a high "sweep" look from shoulder back to tail head.
UGLY. Always has been and definitely not acceptable in the show ring now.
Other than that, this was a good article.
the part about the paternal grandmothers udder is interesting...most folks me included, have concentrated ""mostly ""on the dam of the replacment you are purchasing..though the bull testical structure Is somewhat a indicator of balance,you don't usually get to see the sire of the animals grandmother......if they even owned her...
 

Son of Butch

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Visual appraisal is over rated.
A cow that can calve unassisted and wean off an above average calf 6 straight years doesn't need to be changed.
With honest record keeping the cows will tell you what works best.
Leave it up to man and you'll get "Fluffy Cows" and everything else under the sun.
 

greybeard

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Son of Butch":2z6mjstu said:
Visual appraisal is over rated.
A cow that can calve unassisted and wean off an above average calf 6 straight years doesn't need to be changed.
With honest record keeping the cows will tell you what works best.
Leave it up to man and you'll get "Fluffy Cows" and everything else under the sun.

The # of people that want those boxy fluffy cows is amazing,and it's not just a minor thing.........they GOT to have them that way or it's cull city..as someone somewhere else said, "they're the new micro pigs"
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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greybeard":lzq6n1tp said:
Son of Butch":lzq6n1tp said:
Visual appraisal is over rated.
A cow that can calve unassisted and wean off an above average calf 6 straight years doesn't need to be changed.
With honest record keeping the cows will tell you what works best.
Leave it up to man and you'll get "Fluffy Cows" and everything else under the sun.

The # of people that want those boxy fluffy cows is amazing,and it's not just a minor thing.........they GOT to have them that way or it's cull city..as someone somewhere else said, "they're the new micro pigs"

I see pictures of those kind of cattle and I can't imagine wanting cattle looking that way. I had a purchased heifer that didn't make the cut for the bred heifer sale because she was too short bred. Decent size BWF type heifer, figure her to be a Simmental but not sure. I kept her for a cow although didn't like her she was the hairiest thing I had ever had, still refer to her as that fuzzy cow. She spent the first summer in the pond and then in the winter she had mud caked on her almost all over like a hog that had been wallowing.
Several years later still have her she has shedded off seems like a little more but still not enough I don't think. She raises a decent calf or she would have been gone, I have been saying that the first good excuse to sell her I will.
 

Midtenn

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Son of Butch":3nxfzuxg said:
Visual appraisal is over rated.
A cow that can calve unassisted and wean off an above average calf 6 straight years doesn't need to be changed.
With honest record keeping the cows will tell you what works best.
Leave it up to man and you'll get "Fluffy Cows" and everything else under the sun.

That was very well said. Some of my money-makers are small/large/off-colored/you name it. But in a herd building situation those just starting don't have the luxury of keeping replacements from "proven" cows.
 

Son of Butch

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Perhaps when just starting out selling 3 or 4 calves and using that money to buy a couple replacement calves from
proven cows might be the way to go, at least until they can identify which of their own cows are their best ones.
 

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