CFIA Completes BSE Investigation

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Today 6/16/2006 1:37:00 PM


Canadian Food Inspection Agency Completes BSE Investigation



OTTAWA, ONTARIO--(CCNMatthews - June 16, 2006) - The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has concluded its investigation of the case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) confirmed on April 16, 2006, in a cow from British Columbia.



The investigation, conducted in line with international guidelines, identified 148 animals, including the affected animal's herdmates and recent offspring. From this group, 22 live animals were located and all tested negative for BSE. One additional animal, which is currently pregnant, has been placed under quarantine and will be tested once it has calved. Of the remaining animals investigated, 77 had died or been slaughtered, 15 were exported to the United States and 33 were untraceable. Because BSE investigations typically involve older animals, it is common for a portion of the herdmates to go untraceable due to lack of records.



The Agency examined feed to which the affected animal would have been exposed early in its life, when cattle are most likely to develop BSE. Efforts to identify potential routes of transmission included reviews of records and procedures at the farm, retail and production levels. While a specific source of infection was not found, investigators determined that vehicles and equipment used to ship and receive a variety of ingredients likely contaminated cattle feed with the BSE agent.



Investigators also identified a feed ingredient supplier common to this case and Canada's fourth BSE animal, confirmed on January 22, 2006. This potential link suggests that all of Canada's BSE cases fall within the same geographic cluster, which is reflective of feed sourcing, production and distribution patterns. The clustering theory is explained in the epidemiological report Canada's Assessment of the North American BSE Cases Diagnosed From 2003 to 2005, which is available on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's website.



The investigation noted high compliance with the requirements of Canada's feed ban. Such findings-which have been observed during other investigations and regular inspections of feed mills, renderers and retailers across the country-confirm the presence of limited opportunities for contamination during feed manufacture, transportation, storage and use. With an eye to eliminating these risks, the Agency continues its progress toward enhancing Canada's feed ban. Proposed changes would prohibit the use of potentially harmful cattle tissues as ingredients in any animal feeds.
 
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This is an excerpt from the complete CFIA report that suggests the cluster area of the Canadian infection may be greater than just the province of Alberta and that since this isn't from one feed violation their may be multiple exposures and multiple infected cattle still in Canadian herds.....

The location of the index case’s birth farm may suggest yet an additional geographic cluster. However, given its possible relationship with a previously identified source of prohibited material, this occurrence similarly suggests that the feed distribution area associated with the existing geographic cluster may not be confined to Alberta, but may include additional Western provinces. The timing of the presumed exposure of Cases 4 and 5, born in the same year and month, suggests an insult to the feed system separate and apart from the one associated with the previous cases born in 1996 - 1997. Cases 4 and 5 suggest that the previously acknowledged and undetected first generation indigenous BSE cluster contained a minimum of two animals.
 

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I will agree OT that is weird that the cases seem to be happening in Northern Alberta, whether or not the feed at this BC dairy come from the same places or not i don't know.

I do know that where i live, there are lots of people who submit brain samples of their animals wanting to clear the air and find out the truth.

Myself in the last few years I have submitted samples every year on cows that have gotten buggered up ( hardware, and whatever else). If it's here in volume let's find it.
 

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I understand that investigators figure that the USA cases are from a form that has mutated. That is the Beef Industry's worst nightmare.
 
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SEC":1bw4afmg said:
I understand that investigators figure that the USA cases are from a form that has mutated. That is the Beef Industry's worst nightmare.

This strain is called "atypical" because it is different from the "normal" strain that has been mostly found...
I have read several scientists takes from around the world-- some say they think it mutated from the "normal BSE"- some say the normal BSE may have mutated from this atypical strain- some say this is an absolutely new strain that may be derived from another form of TSE- and some now think this is a strain that has been around for some time.....

Some think that while "normal" BSE is tied to vCJD in humans, this "atypical" BSE may be tied to sCJD...

They say it is "spontaneous" because they have no idea how it is transmitted or what causes it to be generated...

All this leads me to the feeling that most of these government agencies (USDA-CFIA-OIE) have absolutely no idea of what they are talking about when they deal with BSE...That is the reason their "sound science" is still all theories...And everyday another of their theories gets holes shot in it....
 
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SEC":18yd4ar3 said:
I will agree OT that is weird that the cases seem to be happening in Northern Alberta, whether or not the feed at this BC dairy come from the same places or not i don't know.

I do know that where i live, there are lots of people who submit brain samples of their animals wanting to clear the air and find out the truth.

Myself in the last few years I have submitted samples every year on cows that have gotten buggered up ( hardware, and whatever else). If it's here in volume let's find it.

SEC- Get a chance if you can and read the entire report.Heres a link:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani ... este.shtml

From what I gather the last 2 POST feedban cattle are tied back to feed mills that had the same contract trucking firm that hauled product for those mills and did not adequately clean its trucks...But the other post feed ban case is not tied to that trucking firm- which is why they think they have more than 1 violation, and more than 1 infected cow that ended up rendered into feed.....But I could find nowhere in the report who or how many mills the contract trucker hauled for- for how long a period (was he still doing it this year? This would mean years of 2nd and 3rd or 4th generation positives showing up) - and to where?...Is this why they think the cluster area could now include Canadian province(s)? Which provinces did that truckers end material end up in?

The problem with the report is that for every question it answers it raises 5 more.....
 

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OT, I hear what you are saying. This stuff is a little mind boggling.
Back to what I have stated all along, if we test everything nothing else matters. It's very simple!
 

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