Bottle calf

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Maxrock2306

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Location
Wibaux Mt. AKA The middle of nowhere
We have a 3 week old bottle calf that just doesn't seem to ever have any energy. We feed 4 times a day (2.5 pints each time) and he eats great for three of them but will not touch his bottle on either the 3 or 4th feeding. He has had the overeating shot. He's showing no signs of either navil or joint ill or anything else. He just doesn't ever want to move around. Any suggestions for trying to bring his energy up?? We do try and feed him quality starter and hay is available.
 
I don't bottle the way you are describing tho lots feed 2 qts, 3 times a day. I would think you'd be ok on your bottle schedule tho!

How big of an area does your calf have?
Is it in a small pen? Large pen? Have you let it out to run in a new area?

Sometimes they just wanna sleep a lot. Are it's ears droopy? How's its temperature?

Some pics may be helpful
 
Make sure that you're weighing the milk replacer powder each time and feeding at the correct concentration. If your ratio of powder to water is off, calves can have a hard time digesting it and refuse bottles later in the day.


Calves should also have access to fresh water at all times.
 
I don't bottle the way you are describing tho lots feed 2 qts, 3 times a day. I would think you'd be ok on your bottle schedule tho!

How big of an area does your calf have?
Is it in a small pen? Large pen? Have you let it out to run in a new area?

Sometimes they just wanna sleep a lot. Are it's ears droopy? How's its temperature?

Some pics may be helpful
I pen them up at night but during the day 7am-dark they have 40 acres to run and play. He follows the other 3 around and then lays down once they pick a spot. Never seems to play or run with the others. I do measure replacer and there is always fresh water. Ears are not droopy and no fever. I know he had a tough first 10 days half starved when they found him and then locked in a horse trailer for a few days until we got him. Maybe he's just taking awhile to overcome his rough start. I have given him vitamin B paste but it hasn't helped enough to notice.
 
I pen them up at night but during the day 7am-dark they have 40 acres to run and play. He follows the other 3 around and then lays down once they pick a spot. Never seems to play or run with the others. I do measure replacer and there is always fresh water. Ears are not droopy and no fever. I know he had a tough first 10 days half starved when they found him and then locked in a horse trailer for a few days until we got him. Maybe he's just taking awhile to overcome his rough start. I have given him vitamin B paste but it hasn't helped enough to notice.
Sounds like your sure 'nuff doing things pretty right!

Keep an eye on him.

Perhaps some others will chime in as well
 
A B vitamin shot won't hurt. It helps with Appetite. I haven't tried the B paste, try just giving him half a bottle 4 time's a day, might be a little much for him. To get more than that. It's better to have them a little hungry than over fed. With his rough start, it may take him a while before he starts bouncing around. I've taken care of a lot of calves that had a rough start in life. Some take longer than others to get going. Sounds like you are taking Good care of him!
 
I don't bottle the way you are describing tho lots feed 2 qts, 3 times a day. I would think you'd be ok on your bottle schedule tho!

How big of an area does your calf have?
Is it in a small pen? Large pen? Have you let it out to run in a new area?

Sometimes they just wanna sleep a lot. Are it's ears droopy? How's its temperature?

Some pics may be helpful
I don't bottle the way you are describing tho lots feed 2 qts, 3 times a day. I would think you'd be ok on your bottle schedule tho!

How big of an area does your calf have?
Is it in a small pen? Large pen? Have you let it out to run in a new area?

Sometimes they just wanna sleep a lot. Are it's ears droopy? How's its temperature?

Some pics may be helpful

I pen them up at night but during the day 7am-dark they have 40 acres to run and play. He follows the other 3 around and then lays down once they pick a spot. Never seems to play or run with the others. I do measure replacer and there is always fresh water. Ears are not droopy and no fever. I know he had a tough first 10 days half starved when they found him and then locked in a horse trailer for a few days until we got him. Maybe he's just taking awhile to overcome his rough start. I have given him vitamin B paste but it hasn't helped enough to notice.
PXL_20230520_224517598.jpgPXL_20230520_224656385.jpg
 
I agree with Buck, @Maxrock2306

Head down. Squinty eyes. Ears seem droopy. No snotty nose tho it appears.

Haul him to the vet if u have to. I know many don't make farm calls any more and if they do they are expensive. My feeling is a Strong antibiotic with a pain reliever. But it must be prescribed by the vet for the symptoms!
La200/300 is a waste of time and money here. Just my opinion....
 
I started him on nuflor and I'm hoping a week of that will do the job. Beginning to wonder if we might not have a case of joint ill waiting to show up. No swelling yet but really starting to remind of other calves we've had who developed it.
 
I started him on nuflor and I'm hoping a week of that will do the job. Beginning to wonder if we might not have a case of joint ill waiting to show up. No swelling yet but really starting to remind of other calves we've had who developed it.
No experience with joint Ill here.

Have you caught him grinding his teeth any?
 
No he hasn't been doing any of that. If the nuflor doesn't pull him out of it we will try and give him a little break and then probably move up to baytril. I never liked how hard baytril seems to hit these little guys but it does seem to work. Unfortunately we have dealt with too much navil and joint ill, but it's the kinda the price we pay for being known as the place to bring your project calves that most of the ranchers just don't have the time to deal with. We usually end up with 4-6 of them every year.
 
No he hasn't been doing any of that. If the nuflor doesn't pull him out of it we will try and give him a little break and then probably move up to baytril. I never liked how hard baytril seems to hit these little guys but it does seem to work. Unfortunately we have dealt with too much navil and joint ill, but it's the kinda the price we pay for being known as the place to bring your project calves that most of the ranchers just don't have the time to deal with. We usually end up with 4-6 of them every year.
Your calf has all the symptoms of being exposed to the insecticide imidacloprid during development in the womb. He has an obvious underbite, a definitive symptom of Imidacloprid exposure. Imidacloprid concentrations in the spleen of the exposed newborn results in their cells not being able to produce normal levels of heat and energy, resulting in lethargy. The damage to the spleen from imidacloprid results in damage to the digestive system and consequently disrupted immune system function according to studies. I would suggest that you go to a health food store and get a small bottle of the Hyland's Homeopathic cell salt called Calc. Phos. 6X or if they have it, Calc. Ph 30X is even better. Put one tablet of the Calc. Phos. in the bottle of milk (after warming the milk) each time you feed the calf. Calc. Phos. is a really effective electrolyte. It stimulates the cells of the calf to uptake the minerals the cells need to function. That will help the calf to have normal energy levels and be able to digest its food more efficiently. The calf's underdeveloped facial bones should also grow to be normal in length in two or three weeks. The calf will then be able to graze normally and efficiently, so will have normal weight gain. Calves with an underbite have trouble biting off foliage efficiently resulting in less weight gain than calves with a normal bite. When I suggested to my neighbors that they give their calves with underbite and lethargy, baby goats with underbite, that couldn't stand up and walk after they were born, or horse foals with underbite, the Calc. Phos. tablet at least three times a day, if drinking their mother's milk or at each feeding if bottle fed, all of the newborns had normal energy levels within two days and all had their underdeveloped upper jaw bones grow to normal in two weeks. The sooner the Calc. Phos. tablets begin to be given after the youngster is born, the sooner its energy levels and ability to digest its food are stimulated to work at normal levels. Got to my website (www.judyhoy.com) and under where it says Explaining the use of homeopathic cell salts, it says click here to read. There are several before and after photos of young animals that had their cells stimulated to work at normal levels.
 
Your calf has all the symptoms of being exposed to the insecticide imidacloprid during development in the womb. He has an obvious underbite, a definitive symptom of Imidacloprid exposure. Imidacloprid concentrations in the spleen of the exposed newborn results in their cells not being able to produce normal levels of heat and energy, resulting in lethargy. The damage to the spleen from imidacloprid results in damage to the digestive system and consequently disrupted immune system function according to studies. I would suggest that you go to a health food store and get a small bottle of the Hyland's Homeopathic cell salt called Calc. Phos. 6X or if they have it, Calc. Ph 30X is even better. Put one tablet of the Calc. Phos. in the bottle of milk (after warming the milk) each time you feed the calf. Calc. Phos. is a really effective electrolyte. It stimulates the cells of the calf to uptake the minerals the cells need to function. That will help the calf to have normal energy levels and be able to digest its food more efficiently. The calf's underdeveloped facial bones should also grow to be normal in length in two or three weeks. The calf will then be able to graze normally and efficiently, so will have normal weight gain. Calves with an underbite have trouble biting off foliage efficiently resulting in less weight gain than calves with a normal bite. When I suggested to my neighbors that they give their calves with underbite and lethargy, baby goats with underbite, that couldn't stand up and walk after they were born, or horse foals with underbite, the Calc. Phos. tablet at least three times a day, if drinking their mother's milk or at each feeding if bottle fed, all of the newborns had normal energy levels within two days and all had their underdeveloped upper jaw bones grow to normal in two weeks. The sooner the Calc. Phos. tablets begin to be given after the youngster is born, the sooner its energy levels and ability to digest its food are stimulated to work at normal levels. Got to my website (www.judyhoy.com) and under where it says Explaining the use of homeopathic cell salts, it says click here to read. There are several before and after photos of young animals that had their cells stimulated to work at normal levels.
This is a new one for me and I will definitely be looking into it. Thank you for the information.
 
This is a new one for me and I will definitely be looking into it. Thank you for the information.
@J Hoy goes on and on about this homeopathic cell salt thing. It's all over the boards.

Some folks get pretty uptight about it.

Your case would be an interesting one to me for the sake of discovery if nothing else! Sure can't hurt a thing I wouldn't think.

(I'd still consult a qualified vet)
 
@J Hoy goes on and on about this homeopathic cell salt thing. It's all over the boards.

Some folks get pretty uptight about it.

Your case would be an interesting one to me for the sake of discovery if nothing else! Sure can't hurt a thing I wouldn't think.

(I'd still consult a qualified vet)
I definitely will be talking to my vet if I don't have any improvement with the nuflor within a couple of days.
 
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