Chores on frigid/snowy days

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Dave
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Dave » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:02 pm

You guys crack me up. Just dress warm and do what needs to be done. Granted there isn't a whole lot to do this time of the year. No hay to make, no fields to plow. Just feed the cows and check on the water are about the only daily chores. Lots of guys work on equipment this time of year. In that case you start a fire in the stove before feeding so the shop will be warm when you get back.
It has been unseasonably warm this winter. Last year there was snow here from Dec.1 until late March. Lots of below 0 days. Thsi year we have only had two snows. One hung around for about 4 days, the other was gone by mid afternoon. On about the coldest morning we have had this year (12F) we went hauled cows from fall pasture to the winter ground. Gathered about 130 cows off about 2,000 acres. Approximately 100 fall pairs, 30 spring calvers, and half a dozen bulls. Hauled 4 semi loads of cows and three goose neck loads of calves about 35 miles. We left the house before daylight and it was dark when the last load of cows came off the truck. I wore wool socks in leather boots, long underwear, wranglers, a hooded sweat shirt, and carhardt coat, white ox gloves, and a stormy kromer hat. I was fine. It was a little chilly that first hour or so being horseback gathering but after that I was on foot and moving around. Long rides are a bit tough in the winter so we avoid them. But everyone has done them at one time or another.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Bright Raven » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:11 pm

Dave wrote:You guys crack me up. Just dress warm and do what needs to be done. Last year there was snow here from Dec.1 until late March. Lots of below 0 days. Thsi year we have only had two snows. One hung around for about 4 days, the other was gone by mid afternoon. On about the coldest morning we have had this year (12F) we went hauled cows from fall pasture to the winter ground. Gathered about 130 cows off about 2,000 acres. Approximately 100 fall pairs, 30 spring calvers, and half a dozen bulls. Hauled 4 semi loads of cows and three goose neck loads of calves about 35 miles. We left the house before daylight and it was dark when the last load of cows came off the truck. I wore wool socks in leather boots, long underwear, wranglers, a hooded sweat shirt, and carhardt coat, white ox gloves, and a stormy kromer hat. I was fine. It was a little chilly that first hour or so being horseback gathering but after that I was on foot and moving around. Long rides are a bit tough in the winter so we avoid them. But everyone has done them at one time or another.


Dave,

As you know, I spent 30 years between Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. The weather here sucks! When it is 27 degrees Fahrenheit here, I feel more miserable than I did at minus 30 in Wyoming. My son was born on January 21, 1984 in Casper. We clipped the newspaper article and put it in his scrapbook. It was minus 44 degrees Fahrenheit on that day. With a wind that was blowing high profile vehicles off the interstate between Casper and Cheyenne. But I have been colder her than I remember it was that day. The cold in the Rocky mountain states is DRY. This damp cold chills you to the bone.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Dave » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:32 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Dave wrote:You guys crack me up. Just dress warm and do what needs to be done. Last year there was snow here from Dec.1 until late March. Lots of below 0 days. Thsi year we have only had two snows. One hung around for about 4 days, the other was gone by mid afternoon. On about the coldest morning we have had this year (12F) we went hauled cows from fall pasture to the winter ground. Gathered about 130 cows off about 2,000 acres. Approximately 100 fall pairs, 30 spring calvers, and half a dozen bulls. Hauled 4 semi loads of cows and three goose neck loads of calves about 35 miles. We left the house before daylight and it was dark when the last load of cows came off the truck. I wore wool socks in leather boots, long underwear, wranglers, a hooded sweat shirt, and carhardt coat, white ox gloves, and a stormy kromer hat. I was fine. It was a little chilly that first hour or so being horseback gathering but after that I was on foot and moving around. Long rides are a bit tough in the winter so we avoid them. But everyone has done them at one time or another.


Dave,

As you know, I spent 30 years between Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. The weather here sucks! When it is 27 degrees Fahrenheit here, I feel more miserable than I did at minus 30 in Wyoming. My son was born on January 21, 1984 in Casper. We clipped the newspaper article and put it in his scrapbook. It was minus 44 degrees Fahrenheit on that day. With a wind that was blowing high profile vehicles off the interstate between Casper and Cheyenne. But I have been colder her than I remember it was that day. The cold in the Rocky mountain states is DRY. This damp cold chills you to the bone.


Remember I was raised and lived on the Washington coast. I understand damp cold. Where I was feeding cows this morning you could almost spit and hit the John Day Dam on the Columbia. It is about 100 miles straight down the Columbia Gorge to Portland. Another 50 miles or so and you are in salt water. This isn't the dry cold of the mountain states. I spent enough time in the Rocky Mountain states to understand the difference. I also spent enough time in Alaska to understand what real cold is like.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Bright Raven » Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:55 pm

Dave wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Dave wrote:You guys crack me up. Just dress warm and do what needs to be done. Last year there was snow here from Dec.1 until late March. Lots of below 0 days. Thsi year we have only had two snows. One hung around for about 4 days, the other was gone by mid afternoon. On about the coldest morning we have had this year (12F) we went hauled cows from fall pasture to the winter ground. Gathered about 130 cows off about 2,000 acres. Approximately 100 fall pairs, 30 spring calvers, and half a dozen bulls. Hauled 4 semi loads of cows and three goose neck loads of calves about 35 miles. We left the house before daylight and it was dark when the last load of cows came off the truck. I wore wool socks in leather boots, long underwear, wranglers, a hooded sweat shirt, and carhardt coat, white ox gloves, and a stormy kromer hat. I was fine. It was a little chilly that first hour or so being horseback gathering but after that I was on foot and moving around. Long rides are a bit tough in the winter so we avoid them. But everyone has done them at one time or another.


Dave,

As you know, I spent 30 years between Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. The weather here sucks! When it is 27 degrees Fahrenheit here, I feel more miserable than I did at minus 30 in Wyoming. My son was born on January 21, 1984 in Casper. We clipped the newspaper article and put it in his scrapbook. It was minus 44 degrees Fahrenheit on that day. With a wind that was blowing high profile vehicles off the interstate between Casper and Cheyenne. But I have been colder her than I remember it was that day. The cold in the Rocky mountain states is DRY. This damp cold chills you to the bone.


Remember I was raised and lived on the Washington coast. I understand damp cold. Where I was feeding cows this morning you could almost spit and hit the John Day Dam on the Columbia. It is about 100 miles straight down the Columbia Gorge to Portland. Another 50 miles or so and you are in salt water. This isn't the dry cold of the mountain states. I spent enough time in the Rocky Mountain states to understand the difference. I also spent enough time in Alaska to understand what real cold is like.


I took a drive down along the Columbia. It was on the interstate if I remember. I went by the John Day Dam. Got into Olympia and a friend of mine took me fishing out at the mouth of the Columbia. Boat was way too small. In fact, the Coast Guard stopped and warned my friend. Was not fun! Crazy!

I understand the damp cold affects western Oregan and Washington.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby bird dog » Tue Jan 16, 2018 7:21 pm

Good day to update cattle records. Suppose to be 11 in the morning. I'll have to find something else to do for a couple hours.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Dave » Tue Jan 16, 2018 7:30 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Dave wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Dave,

As you know, I spent 30 years between Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. The weather here sucks! When it is 27 degrees Fahrenheit here, I feel more miserable than I did at minus 30 in Wyoming. My son was born on January 21, 1984 in Casper. We clipped the newspaper article and put it in his scrapbook. It was minus 44 degrees Fahrenheit on that day. With a wind that was blowing high profile vehicles off the interstate between Casper and Cheyenne. But I have been colder her than I remember it was that day. The cold in the Rocky mountain states is DRY. This damp cold chills you to the bone.


Remember I was raised and lived on the Washington coast. I understand damp cold. Where I was feeding cows this morning you could almost spit and hit the John Day Dam on the Columbia. It is about 100 miles straight down the Columbia Gorge to Portland. Another 50 miles or so and you are in salt water. This isn't the dry cold of the mountain states. I spent enough time in the Rocky Mountain states to understand the difference. I also spent enough time in Alaska to understand what real cold is like.


I took a drive down along the Columbia. It was on the interstate if I remember. I went by the John Day Dam. Got into Olympia and a friend of mine took me fishing out at the mouth of the Columbia. Boat was way too small. In fact, the Coast Guard stopped and warned my friend. Was not fun! Crazy!

I understand the damp cold affects western Oregan and Washington.


I do understand small boats and crazy at the mouth of the Columbia. The buoy 10 fishery people lose anything close to common sense. There is a reason why the mouth of the Columbia is called the Graveyard of the Pacific.

The wind blows so often and so hard in the Columbia Gorge that it doesn't even make the local news. Last week or so there was a gust recorded at 92 mph. Yesterday they were predicting winds to 70 mph. They say here that the wind blows 360 days of the year. The other 5 it is just changing direction. The rancher I have been helping said he was watching the news recently and they said there was a high wind warning somewhere. They were predicting a 40 mph wind. He was flabbergasted. He said 40 mph isn't a high wind, it is a good stiff breeze
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Aaron » Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:37 pm

greybeard wrote:And while we're seeking input from those in the frozen North...., anyone got a tip on how to 'easily' get a frozen pickup truck door open.... maybe using just common household chemicals?
(it's unlocked and the handles work--just froze tight at the jamb and rubber seal from several hours of sleet frozen rain)


Heat gun.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Aaron » Tue Jan 16, 2018 9:04 pm

herofan wrote:I'm curious; for those who are experiencing the frigid temperatures, does your farm operation still require a day's work outside, or does the weather put a damper on chores?

Today, there is 4 inches of snow here, it's still snowing, and it's 10 degrees. I checked on the cows, put out hay, checked water, and unless there is an emergency, I'm back in the house for the day. I don't have any heated outbuildings, so there is really nothing that I can do or that needs doing on a day like today.


Cows are fed and checked and then it is back inside for the day. Might go visit a neighbor or two if I haven't seen them for a while. Someday I'll have a heated shop where I can get things prepped to go for the 'good seasons'. But I need another 25 cows before I'll even attempt to make them pay for such an investment - spray foam and radiant floor heat ain't cheap.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Boot Jack Bulls » Tue Jan 16, 2018 9:21 pm

As most others from the north have stated, its about doing only what really needs doing when it is super cold and putting in some time/forethought into planning for the winter long before it gets here.

Fall for some means pretty leaves. For us, aside from calving, it means winterizing automatic waterers, killing heat/power to bottom wire on fences, fixing up bale feeders, putting out creep sheds for calves and goats, doing maintenance on windbreaks, fencing stock off the lake, getting blankets for the horses (and calves and goats as needed) out of storage, getting heated water pails set up in the barn, etc.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Midtenn » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:52 pm

This morning i did only what HAD to be done outside during the snowfall starting at 6:30...fed 10 rolls of hay at 4 different farms , busted ice and fed grain to the heifers and to one set of cows that has calves at side. Had breakfast with Dad, Fed and watered the horses and dog and ..... LOL, thawed out a cat! Long story there. Had lunch with son and from 12:30 on I was inside getting totals ready for my accountant and found out how much money I didn't make this year.
It's going to be bitter cold here tomorrow. Nothing planned. Maybe work in the shop after breaking ice.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby Silver » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:58 pm

Extreme heat and extreme cold are both awful and have some similarities. For example, in either scenario never pick up a tool bare handed that has been exposed to the elements for long. Hurts like he!! either way.
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Re: Chores on frigid/snowy days

Postby boondocks » Tue Jan 16, 2018 11:39 pm

Spent about 6 hrs outside today. Plowing and cleaning ice/snow off trucks took up about half of that. Feeding and chipping ice out of the trough another hour. Boss brand salter on back of truck is down (again--never buy one, they're POS), so another hour or two was comprised of hand-salting and sanding the bottom half of our 1/4 mi long steep driveway. Our tenants have a 2 WD truck that is not cutting it. Told hubs that next tenants will have AWD or 4WD or they won't be our tenants. We've told them since Aug. to get snow tires but they haven't. If this weather keeps up I'll buy a set and let them use them for the rest of the winter. It would be less wear and tear on my old plow truck (and its weary driver)...
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