Wood Posts and Barbed wire-Another way to do it

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tytower

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Came across this method the other day . Smaller hole for wire so less insects and rain inside the post but tie wire will be dissimilar metal to high tensile barbed wire so I would imagine rust will start more quickly.
Normally over here in Australia we turn the posts perpendicular to the wire and drill a big 1" hole right through . the wire is fed through these holes
What do you guys think?

Photos are on gallery now but what a bloody time consuming exercise just to post two photos . Needs to be simplified !


 

bigbull338

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i dont know what your talking about.but heres what we do when we are dealing with barbed wire an wooden post.we drive steaples into the post to hold the wire in place.
 

Bez+

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tytower":3nh9vi09 said:
Came across this method the other day . Smaller hole for wire so less insects and rain inside the post but tie wire will be dissimilar metal to high tensile barbed wire so I would imagine rust will start more quickly.

What do you guys think?

Trying to attach 2 photos but it does not want to take them??

Huh?

You drilling holes and running wire through the post?

Far too much work in my mind

But if it works for you then go for it

Bez+
 

Jim62

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I don't see what you're talking about, either. But running barb wire through holes in posts has got to be a painfully slow operation. Must take months to build a mile of fence.........
 

backhoeboogie

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I've been burned out here at the house and lost all fence posts. Grass fires over the past 30 years at the farm and on leased pasture has also cost me fence posts and fence. So I have vowed to never use wood.

That being said, the only thing I like about wooden posts is that you can tighten old barbed wire runs by driving steeples on the circumference of the post. Routing the wire without steeples is not appealing to me in any way.
 

okbob

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can you show a pic of a line post and not a corner/h brace, i think i understand the concept but need to see how the fence line post are done
 

Jogeephus

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When I first looked at the H brace my first thought was that the diaganals were running the wrong way (they would be with nails). But after studying it for a bit I see how the wire ties it all together. Pretty clever.IMHO On your posts between braces do you do use the same setup as the outside post? Is the purpose of this to allow you - if needed - to tighten the whole run without unfastening the wire from each post?
 

Loch Valley Fold

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I can see why they would drill the holes on the corner like that as it would keep the stay more flush against the post were the rest of the fence line done the same way ? I try & keep away from drilling holes for the fence much quicker just to use staples. It all comes down to how you like your fences to look
 

novatech

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Sorry, but this is structurally unsound. You have actually cut the bearing strength in half. This process can cause the post to split down the middle. It would be much better to notch the back side of the post or staple. The horizontal member does not require anything more than 1 nail to keep it in place until tension is put on it. The less you cut up a post the longer it will last.
 

BeefmasterB

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novatech":1am3de3w said:
Sorry, but this is structurally unsound. You have actually cut the bearing strength in half. This process can cause the post to split down the middle. It would be much better to notch the back side of the post or staple. The horizontal member does not require anything more than 1 nail to keep it in place until tension is put on it. The less you cut up a post the longer it will last.


Good points! My first worry about the set-up was the wire through the hole(s) eventually splitting the post and stay, since the wire is under tension.
 

BeefmasterB

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backhoeboogie":o6cw7dnl said:
I've been burned out here at the house and lost all fence posts. Grass fires over the past 30 years at the farm and on leased pasture has also cost me fence posts and fence. So I have vowed to never use wood.

That being said, the only thing I like about wooden posts is that you can tighten old barbed wire runs by driving steeples on the circumference of the post. Routing the wire without steeples is not appealing to me in any way.


Off the subject a bit, but how to you keep tension on the metal end post when tying it off?
 

novatech

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I tighten off the second post and wrap the first post tightly. When I release the tension on the second post I loose a tiny bit, but not enough to make any difference.
 

dun

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novatech":vq48jpu3 said:
I tighten off the second post and wrap the first post tightly. When I release the tension on the second post I loose a tiny bit, but not enough to make any difference.

If I lose more then a little I just take it up with a Jakes
 

marimus

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In regard to fixing barbwire to posts with staples, it ain't gonna happen because our hardwoods are harder than the staples when you cut them green, and they get harder every minute thereafter.

Drilling the 1" holes in the post is done with an "atom drill" which is powered by a chainsaw engine. Each post is drilled through in a matter of seconds, then the barb is pulled through and tensioned. Takes no time at all, less time than staples. Once its done it stays done. Only downside is the tendency to bend the barbs to all run in the same direction, meaning they are tame one way and savage the other.

Down south they drill a small hole parallel to the barbwire, and run a tiewire through it and around the barb on both sides of the post.
 

spoon

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marimus":3lgfyqlo said:
In regard to fixing barbwire to posts with staples, it ain't gonna happen because our hardwoods are harder than the staples when you cut them green, and they get harder every minute thereafter.

Drilling the 1" holes in the post is done with an "atom drill" which is powered by a chainsaw engine. Each post is drilled through in a matter of seconds, then the barb is pulled through and tensioned. Takes no time at all, less time than staples. Once its done it stays done. Only downside is the tendency to bend the barbs to all run in the same direction, meaning they are tame one way and savage the other.

Down south they drill a small hole parallel to the barbwire, and run a tiewire through it and around the barb on both sides of the post.

Well, it may take less time than staples with your hardwood posts but I use nice soft treated pine posts and staples are real easy and quick. :nod:
 

msscamp

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marimus":3j9f7myp said:
In regard to fixing barbwire to posts with staples, it ain't gonna happen because our hardwoods are harder than the staples when you cut them green, and they get harder every minute thereafter.

Drilling the 1" holes in the post is done with an "atom drill" which is powered by a chainsaw engine. Each post is drilled through in a matter of seconds, then the barb is pulled through and tensioned. Takes no time at all, less time than staples. Once its done it stays done. Only downside is the tendency to bend the barbs to all run in the same direction, meaning they are tame one way and savage the other.

Down south they drill a small hole parallel to the barbwire, and run a tiewire through it and around the barb on both sides of the post.

It you can drill a hole in your hardwoods, you can drive a staple in them. You just need a better quality staple.
 

novatech

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BeefmasterB":35we2lhx said:
novatech":35we2lhx said:
Sorry, but this is structurally unsound. You have actually cut the bearing strength in half. This process can cause the post to split down the middle. It would be much better to notch the back side of the post or staple. The horizontal member does not require anything more than 1 nail to keep it in place until tension is put on it. The less you cut up a post the longer it will last.


Good points! My first worry about the set-up was the wire through the hole(s) eventually splitting the post and stay, since the wire is under tension.
If you look at the first pic you may notice the diagonal wire is already splitting the vertical post just above the hole. A better method, given the wood may be to hard to drive a staple, is to notch the back side of the post (chain saw) to secure the wire in place and leaving the post with it's full bearing strength.
 

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