• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Wolves

townfarmer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
468
Reaction score
0
Location
Eukey Australia
I've just watched a documentary about the reintroduction of wolves into the northern rocky states of America. It was fascinating to see the impact of increased wolf numbers on cattle producers. I'm interested to hear peoples opinions and experiences with predation on their cattle. Which breeds do people think are better at protecting their calves from predators?

The link for the documentary is

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8yx4j ... of_animals

Andrew
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
the biggest impact so far is on the Elk populations. Hunting permits have dropped way down in the wolf areas. The Canadian Gray Wolves are not native to the US Rocky Mountains. The native species was a smaller wolf known as the Buffalo wolf. The wolf introduction was decided on for the most part by those that make the laws in Washington pressured by special interest groups. Few area residents support the introduction of Canadian Grey Wolves. These wolves are big and hunt in pairs or packs, when they want a calf or cow they take it with no difficulty. There isn't any breed of cattle that could hold off a pack of these Canadian Wolves. These introduced wolves are multiplying and expanding their range at a faster rate then even the most optimistic imagined. They are taking cattle regularly and as the game populations get decimated the Canadian wolves will rely more and more on livestock. Check back on it in a couple of years, the wolves will have to be controlled.
 

Brandonm22

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
1,848
Reaction score
0
I am not sure that any breed is an even match for wolves. Poor mothers are going to lose more calves than good mothers; but when five or six wolves go after ANY cow and calf I expect the wolves (which can weigh 100++ lbs) too have the advantage. I would not actually do this without further research (because there would be a dock involved); but many ranchers in lands being repopulated by wolves "MAY" want to consider putting the horns back on the cows.
 

townfarmer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
468
Reaction score
0
Location
Eukey Australia
There isn't any breed of cattle that could hold off a pack of these Canadian Wolves.

I guess you're right. If wolf packs can take down bison, moose and elk there's probibly not much hope for a cow that is much slower and less agile.

I would not actually do this without further research (because there would be a dock involved); but many ranchers in lands being repopulated by wolves "MAY" want to consider putting the horns back on the cows

That would be an interesting study to see if horned cattle have better calf survival rates in areas of high predation. In some areas it may prove more economical to have a herd with horns even with a penalty at the sale yards.
 

LoveMoo11

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
1,090
Reaction score
0
Location
Maine
We don't have any wolves up here but we do have coyotes that will occasionally get a calf. This usually only happens when the calf gets on the wrong side of the fence and goes wandering. I have seen coyotes and a dog get into our pasture and the cows do not tolerate it, especially when there are calves (I have Angus). We also used to have a donkey (he died a month or so ago) and he was a great protector. He almost killed a neighbor's (very dumb) chocolate lab who got into the pasture and was teasing the cows.
 

Bez+

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
1,011
Reaction score
0
Location
Still trying to get back to even.
Brandonm22":dgh88q6d said:
I am not sure that any breed is an even match for wolves. Poor mothers are going to lose more calves than good mothers; but when five or six wolves go after ANY cow and calf I expect the wolves (which can weigh 100++ lbs) too have the advantage. I would not actually do this without further research (because there would be a dock involved); but many ranchers in lands being repopulated by wolves "MAY" want to consider putting the horns back on the cows.

About 5 years ago - maybe a bit more - I shot a real nice wolf just off the White Mud Grazing Range in north west Alberta - weighed it on a government scale - I think it was 176 pounds / 80 kilos and some few ounces - certified and stamped - a friend has the skin on his wall - it is quite large

A good adult timber wolf can be a big dog - most are a lot lighter but very common to be well over 100 pounds if mature and well fed. Every now and then someone calls me on the weight and I pull out that weigh scale stamp - makes their eyes open a bit wider.

Lost a few animals to them over the years - but in truth they took a lot more moose and deer

Bez+
 

Aaron

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2005
Messages
5,218
Reaction score
1
Location
Stratton, ON, Canada
I have two rules when dealing with cows and wolves.

#1) No wolf is harmed if it stays in it's own area and only eats wild game.

#2) If a wolf attacks a calf, the cow better kill it and/or die in the process. If the cow shows up with no calf, she is on the first truck out of here. This is an important rule for management. Dad and I always stuck by this rule and our cows don't take any guff from any wild animal less than 150-200 lbs. Cougars, wolves, dogs, etc...all chased off the property by the cows in a buffalo-style defense stance (calves in the center with cows surrounding the perimeter). Straighbred Herefords are good for this. Cross cattle seem to be the other way, as our Char crosses, years ago, would turn tail and run away in every direction...which means an easy meal, especially for a pack of wolves or coyotes.

Neighbour has some Red Angus cows, along with Herefords, and they will run and abandon their calves at the first sight of anything menacing. Could also be management, as this fellow does keep the cow who lost her calf, if she is "a real good cow." We haven't lost a calf in 15 years to a wild animal, while that neighbour, who lives less than a mile away loses as least a couple each year.

I don't ask a cow to do much, but raise a calf and breed back are definite musts. :cowboy:
 

Stocker Steve

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
10,221
Reaction score
10
Location
Central Minnesota
Aaron":3hvvpcyv said:
Cougars, wolves, dogs, etc...all chased off the property by the cows in a buffalo-style defense stance (calves in the center with cows surrounding the perimeter). Straighbred Herefords are good for this. Cross cattle seem to be the other way, as our Char crosses, years ago, would turn tail and run away in every direction.:cowboy:

The French don't win many conflicts...
 

P.A.L

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
175
Reaction score
0
Location
Finland
Horned herefords are great protectors. Once there was a pack of wolves around here and herefords made this protection circle and herd was in thight group for many days after. We have also real dog killers in the herd. A couple of years ago i was at fields making fence. suddenly a hare was running with a hound towards me, but there was also two herefords running after the hound with their horns pointed to the hounds butt. eventually the hound desided to find nearest way out of the fence lines.
 

Brandonm22

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 7, 2008
Messages
1,848
Reaction score
0
Bez+":pdzk8sjn said:
About 5 years ago - maybe a bit more - I shot a real nice wolf just off the White Mud Grazing Range in north west Alberta - weighed it on a government scale - I think it was 176 pounds / 80 kilos and some few ounces - certified and stamped - a friend has the skin on his wall - it is quite large

A good adult timber wolf can be a big dog - most are a lot lighter but very common to be well over 100 pounds if mature and well fed. Every now and then someone calls me on the weight and I pull out that weigh scale stamp - makes their eyes open a bit wider.

If it is 176 lbs your wolf is the new North American record.......http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf
 

townfarmer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
468
Reaction score
0
Location
Eukey Australia
Aaron and P.A.L your cow herds sound a bit like this mob that treed a bear

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJ1ZZjM4K6U[/youtube]

:clap: :clap: :clap:

Andrew
 

I luv herfrds

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2007
Messages
5,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Montana
Talked to some folks I met a while back.
Well one day they shot a coyote on the way to feed the cows, they decided to tie a rope around the coyote and drag it behind the truck.
Needless to say their herd of cows were chasing, stomping, butting and running over this coyote; even though it was already dead. By around the 3rd pass around the pasture the cows were pretty much done with it.

Now wolves are a different story all together.
We lost a calf back in '96. The pairs were up against the fence bawling like crazy. Went out and found the calf on the feed ground. You could see from the tracks that the cow had done what she could to save the calf.
Lost a cow in '98; another calf in '01 and the last calf we lost was back in '03.
The cows we have are aggressive towards any canine.
Back in '96 I had a horse that chased coyotes and dogs like crazy. I never saw that horse act like she did that day before or afterwards.
Ever since we know when a wolf has come through. The cows will be bunched together and there is no lone "babysitter" with the calves.
 

jedstivers

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 22, 2008
Messages
5,787
Reaction score
1
Location
Marianna Arkansas (East Central)
Mine don't have calves yet but even if our dogs get inside the wire there are a few with heads down and putting them out fast. One mourning a mouth or so back I looked out my bathroom window (I can see cows out of any window in the house :) ) and saw my black baldy at a fast trot and none of the others were, on a closer look she was chasing a opossum. Never seen anything like that before.
 

Boldcat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2006
Messages
71
Reaction score
0
Location
Saskatchewan
Here are some wolves that my sons picked up around here. We've never lost any cattle to wolves . We believe the best defense is a good offence :cowboy: . The one by the snowmobile weighed 105#s and the one taken before the snow was 103#s. None of the other ones were weighed.








 
Top