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Wire grabs for high tensile

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Tonka

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Who makes a good set of grabs to use with a come along for high tensile barb ?
 

fence_it

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We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.

 

Farm Fence Solutions

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fence_it":1dk8hcen said:
We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.


Amen. Ask Fence what he thinks of them.
 
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Tonka

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What makes the chain strainer so much better than a good come along ?
 

Farm Fence Solutions

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Tonka":2eaalpwl said:
What makes the chain strainer so much better than a good come along ?

Come alongs will be fine, if you have a wire dog for each end. Chain strainers can walk forward and backward without flipping any levers. They also have two jaws hooked when you are tying under tension, so they are a bit safer. No cable to wear out or break. Cheaper. Jaws don't pizz out. Lighter and more compact for storage. No finger pinching. More durable. Me and Fence used them both today. They are both usefull, but if I could only have one, it'd be the chain strainer.
 

Farm Fence Solutions

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fence_it":1rmtqmdl said:
We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.


Have you seen the bent pipe job that Strainrite has to run the chain through? Looks handy for making room to tie a join under tension.
 
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Tonka

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Is the boundary strainer the same except for the hooks instead of the wire dogs ?
 

Farm Fence Solutions

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Tonka":k5vzrjst said:
Is the boundary strainer the same except for the hooks instead of the wire dogs ?

No. The boundary strainer has a much larger mechanical advantage and a much longer chain, in addition to having hooks instead of wire gripping ends. Boundary strainers are made to tension up to 10 strands at once(we use a pair to tension 2096-6 deer net), while the 502 chain strainers are made to tension one strand at a time.
 
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Tonka

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So then how much pull in #’s will the boundary strainers exert ?
 

fence_it

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Farm Fence Solutions":20p1k97g said:
fence_it":20p1k97g said:
We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.


Have you seen the bent pipe job that Strainrite has to run the chain through? Looks handy for making room to tie a join under tension.

Is this it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alsYoXmKhZk

It does look very interesting. Simple but effective. May have to rig one up. :D
 

M-5

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Farm Fence Solutions":1kcaua2r said:
fence_it":1kcaua2r said:
We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.


Amen. Ask Fence what he thinks of them.
Buy one of these and the golden rod makes nice wall decorations. Has a slight learning curve but well worth the money
 

callmefence

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M-5":16hs8hdk said:
Farm Fence Solutions":16hs8hdk said:
fence_it":16hs8hdk said:
We've used maasdam wire grips before with some success. For high tensile barb the best thing is really a good pair of chain strainers. Strainrite makes a good pair and I think FFS sells them. A good pair of chain strainers will be the best fencing tool you could ever wish for.


Amen. Ask Fence what he thinks of them.
Buy one of these and the golden rod makes nice wall decorations. Has a slight learning curve but well worth the money

Since we switched to hightensil wire.
I've been wearing out a pair of goldenrods a week. Luke showed us the chain strainer. I don't think it will replace the come along and dog for me. But it will most likely replace the goldenrod. It's not as handy IMO. But the goldenrod is simply not made to stand up to high tensile. I was gonna buy one but farm fence left his on the back of my truck... :D

I would still love to see someone make a goldenrod with jaws to stand up to high tensile.
 

callmefence

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M-5":1wxp4gsk said:
the best dog IMO is the one with the round wedge and the notched sleeve . the jawed ones slip too easy. But Im just a hobby fence builder

That's the dog we use hobby fence.
For those that can't find them Google Moore maker knifes. They carry them.
 

Farm Fence Solutions

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Tonka":xc2d01ig said:
So then how much pull in #’s will the boundary strainers exert ?

That is a question that I can't answer off the top of my head, but we tension to about 450 pounds per line wire, so a 20 line deer net split between two boundary strainers would be at least 4,500 pounds. They still have plenty left in the tank at that point.
 
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Tonka

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Farm Fence Solutions":mk5x8pr7 said:
Tonka":mk5x8pr7 said:
So then how much pull in #’s will the boundary strainers exert ?

That is a question that I can't answer off the top of my head, but we tension to about 450 pounds per line wire, so a 20 line deer net split between two boundary strainers would be at least 4,500 pounds. They still have plenty left in the tank at that point.

Now the physics are coming in to play . Not my strongest subject :(
So if you want to put 450# of tension on a single wire your strainer will have to exert 450 #’s of pull.

If you want to put 450#’s of tension on an 84212 woven wire will it require 3600 #’s of pull from the strainer ? Or will the strain force be somewhat different do to multiple strands of wire ?
Does this make sense ?
 

callmefence

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I spent a good portion of my career doing commercial work. Everything was done under the guidelines of blueprints and specs.
It was a common requirement for barbwire to be pulled to 800 pounds.
This was before high tensile.
I never had it tested but if 800 pounds means enough pull to move 800 pounds of weight. I wouldn't consider that very tight..... maybe I'm wrong
 

BrandX

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why don't people use a winch for stretch? it seems way less physical effort and u have no problem with getting a tight stretch
 

Bright Raven

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callmefence":1qjyq3ls said:
I spent a good portion of my career doing commercial work. Everything was done under the guidelines of blueprints and specs.
It was a common requirement for barbwire to be pulled to 800 pounds.
This was before high tensile.
I never had it tested but if 800 pounds means enough pull to move 800 pounds of weight. I wouldn't consider that very tight..... maybe I'm wrong

Andy. Tension is not measured as the force required to move say 800 pounds. Because it depends on the surface the 800 pounds is setting on. If it is a high friction surface, the pounds-force required to move 800 pounds one foot distance is greater than the tension required to move 800 pounds one foot on a low friction surface. There are gauges used to measure tension in pounds-force. If the requirement is 800 pounds-force, that does not exactly equate to what it takes to move 800 pounds one foot distance.

When Luke was demonstrating his fence tools, I thought he had a tension guage???
 

callmefence

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BrandX":3ks68x1z said:
why don't people use a winch for stretch? it seems way less physical effort and u have no problem with getting a tight stretch

I typically use a truck or tractor to stretch. The other tools more for holding the wire. Some examples exist back in the fence tips thread.
Bright Raven":3ks68x1z said:
callmefence":3ks68x1z said:
I spent a good portion of my career doing commercial work. Everything was done under the guidelines of blueprints and specs.
It was a common requirement for barbwire to be pulled to 800 pounds.
This was before high tensile.
I never had it tested but if 800 pounds means enough pull to move 800 pounds of weight. I wouldn't consider that very tight..... maybe I'm wrong

Andy. Tension is not measured as the force required to move say 800 pounds. Because it depends on the surface the 800 pounds is setting on. If it is a high friction surface, the pounds-force required to move 800 pounds one foot distance is greater than the tension required to move 800 pounds one foot on a low friction surface. There are gauges used to measure tension in pounds-force. If the requirement is 800 pounds-force, that does not exactly equate to what it takes to move 800 pounds one foot distance.

When Luke was demonstrating his fence tools, I thought he had a tension guage???

Thanks for the science Ron.
He didn't bring it. I asked.
There's one built into the small gripple tool, which is a joke imo. You'd pull the handle off the thing before it gets tight.
Let it be known.
This is a different tool than the invaluable to me now contractor tool.
I think farm will probably agree with me on this.
 

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