Why would someone want a cow that is 1500lbs?

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redangus

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I saw a Charlois breeder on here recently bragging about a 1900 lb cow?? Why would you want such a thing? In the long run, you are going to make money with moderate cattle much more so than with small elephants that will eat as much as two 6 frame cows. :idea: Don't understand this thought process???
 

PATB

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Dad and my cows are between frame 4 to 7, mature weight in between 1150 lb to 1900 lbs.
 
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redangus

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A cow that is 1600-1900 cannot consistently produce 1/2 their body weight via a calf in 7 months. If they cannot do this without creep, they are not profitable to me.
MILLENIUM.jpg
 

la4angus

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Who is this bull.. If you don't mind Please post his Name and Reg. #
I would like to look him up on the Red Angus Assn site.
 

dun

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Neo-Sho Millenium 065G #596263.
His semen is available fomr CRI/GENEX @ $15.00 per unit.
I have one of his daughters. Milks too much but breeds back on schedule and weans a really good calf. She looks like a Holstein come weaning time because she has milked off so much weight. # weeks later she's gained back at least 100 lbs.
Vet gets a laugh out of her every year. 3 Weeks post weaning you can't pick her out from all of the other cows and she's skin and bones at weaning time. She is the cow that he commented about how low of a body condition can a cow be and still breed back and settle first service.

dun


la4angus":1kjv9g9w said:
Who is this bull.. If you don't mind Please post his Name and Reg. #
I would like to look him up on the Red Angus Assn site.
 

TexasCountryWoman

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Hey "redangus", I beleive that it is better to raise two smaller cows than one big giant one and be able to sell two calves on the same amount of forage. The only feed my cattle get is some coastal round bales when it gets "cold" for a few months in our mild winters. I would rather see a bunch of smaller pregnant cows around each bale than just a few giants. But to each there own. If we all did it just alike there would be no discussion.
 

PATB

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How many you take to the time to weigh and measure the height of your cattle? You may be shock at how much some of your cows will weigh in good flesh.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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PATB":ov4tahpe said:
How many you take to the time to weigh and measure the height of your cattle? You may be shock at how much some of your cows will weigh in good flesh.

We measure, weight tape, all of our Longhorns at birth, 205 days, 12 months, and 2 X a year at mininum. Before weaning at 6 to 7 months we try to take measurements every couple of months--all this is added to our computer database for management and prediciton. Also do measurements when we sell one.
 

Bez

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We raise Horned Herefords.

All calves are weighed with a portable sling and scale at birth. Helps if you can throw a rope. Those born on grass or snow - all in this herd - can be tough to catch! Have had only two this year that have managed to evade me - slippery and smart little devils - they hang out in the heavy bush when they see me coming. :D

Weigh day takes place 205 days after we figure the average birthing date for the herd - run them over a scale. Usually manage to catch the escape artists at this point!

Always weigh the old girls at this time as well. Any little guys who have managed to keep their nuts loose them on this day. Ouch! Vet usually spends the entire day with us - evaluating herd health and doing medicinal maintenance and such.

Cows go from 1200 - 1800 pounds. Hard to believe how heavy some of them get while out on pasture. I am always surprized how heavy some of the lighter looking animals are. And vice versa. Herd usually averages in the mid 1400 pound range.

Weight tapes have been tried and compared to the actual scale weights. Differences are often over three hundred pounds. Body shape is the deciding factor here - so the vet tells me.

The question about cattle height from PATB has me puzzled. Why is cattle height important? Anything under the belly is air - no money here.

Best to all,

Bez
 

CattleAnnie

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My cows are a mixed bunch, but most average around the 1500lb mark. Some are heavier, a few are lighter...none under 1200lbs. Around here when you go to a bred heifer sale, if they are under 1000lbs they get passed by most folks and usually scrape the bottom of the barrel for prices.

Believe it or not, those 1500lb cows raise their calves very well on grass all summer, and sale weights of their calves (realise that this includes the shrink) were 688lbs. And most of those were mid March birth to end April. These animals aren't creeped, they're just grazed on some bush and tame pasture during the summer.

I know that there are plenty of people who will take exception to this, but the bottom line is that not only do I get paid for the quality of the calves that are produced, but also by the pound. So although I personally don't care for cows that are edging up to the tonne mark, I really do love those mid weights.

Just what's working up here. It's nice to hear other people's views on cow size and profitability.

Take care.
 

dun

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Something to think about concerning weight.
Those really heavy cows, particularly if their bone is set up for a 5-6 frame animal, tend to have foot and leg problems more frequently then a more moderate weight cow. Our grass is too good this year. The cows when we weighed them around 2 months post calving all ran 200-400 lbs heavier then they should. On rocky ground or frozen churned up muddy ground it puts a strain on them just getting around.
We've alwasy preferred cows around 950-1100 lbs. This year they are running 1050 for a yearling to 1680.

dun
 

Bez

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CattleAnnie,

If you are from that area of North East B.C. called the Peace Country I would suspect a couple of things - I am presuming of course:

1. Your cattle may have three sided shelter - but generally stay outside year round.

2. Your cattle know what minus 50 temperatures are.

3. You have had more than one calf born on snow.

We lived just outside of Fairview in Alberta - bet you know where that is! We experienced all of these things for many years. One thing about big cows - they seem to manage the cold weather well. Yup, they eat a lot - but they have the body mass required to stand up to the cold.

On the other hand, they also have 18 - 19 hours of daylight in the summer to raise that calf - that means they generally spend a lot of time eating and that means more milk for the little one. It also means I got tired working those long hours as well! :)

It's a wonderful part of the world.

My best,

Bez
 

ollie

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Dun, email Kirby and ask what the mother of millenium weighed. I bet more than 1200. There is a difference between good cows weighing 1200 and sorry big cows weighing 1200. If they are like the ones you posted it dosn't take a very big cow to weigh alot.
 

dun

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She isn't the heavy weight, but she's close. Her normal weight is around 1200 when she's feeding a calf, this year it's 1610. Too much good quality grass.
But she is one of the normal size cows, FS 6, but deep, long, and wide with a huge butt.
That's part of the reason that FS is more valid then weight. Conditions can vary so much. We have a mature FS 4.5 that weighs 1450 lbs this year a 4 year old FS 4.5 that weighs 1336.
According the the standard BIF FS chart a mature FS 6 female should weigh 1295 at BCS of 5.

dun


ollie":1soh2khq said:
Dun, email Kirby and ask what the mother of millenium weighed. I bet more than 1200. There is a difference between good cows weighing 1200 and sorry big cows weighing 1200. If they are like the ones you posted it dosn't take a very big cow to weigh alot.
 

ollie

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dun":8v6t2tpg said:
She isn't the heavy weight, but she's close. Her normal weight is around 1200 when she's feeding a calf, this year it's 1610. Too much good quality grass.
But she is one of the normal size cows, FS 6, but deep, long, and wide with a huge butt.
That's part of the reason that FS is more valid then weight. Conditions can vary so much. We have a mature FS 4.5 that weighs 1450 lbs this year a 4 year old FS 4.5 that weighs 1336.
According the the standard BIF FS chart a mature FS 6 female should weigh 1295 at BCS of 5.

dun


ollie":8v6t2tpg said:
Dun, email Kirby and ask what the mother of millenium So weighed. I bet more than 1200. There is a difference between good cows weighing 1200 and sorry big cows weighing 1200. If they are like the ones you posted it dosn't take a very big cow to weigh alot.
So in answer to the topic those that want to raise Bulls Like millenium use 1500 pound cows.
 

dun

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That would be one way. Another would be a cow and bull combination that have moderate frame but high post yearling growth. But why would anyone want a monster bull like he has turned out to be? When we got this cow his YW was much lower then they are today.
I also sort of question his FS of 6.2. I've found that FS measurments and BCS can vary a great deal from one person to anothers measurments. I know that 58 inches should be 58 inches, but depending on how the cow stands you can get an inch or probably even 2 difference one way or another.
We took FS measuremnts this spring, when you're running them through quickly it's pretty hard to be consistant.

dun

ollie":k1akwl0j said:
dun":k1akwl0j said:
She isn't the heavy weight, but she's close. Her normal weight is around 1200 when she's feeding a calf, this year it's 1610. Too much good quality grass.
But she is one of the normal size cows, FS 6, but deep, long, and wide with a huge butt.
That's part of the reason that FS is more valid then weight. Conditions can vary so much. We have a mature FS 4.5 that weighs 1450 lbs this year a 4 year old FS 4.5 that weighs 1336.
According the the standard BIF FS chart a mature FS 6 female should weigh 1295 at BCS of 5.

dun


ollie":k1akwl0j said:
Dun, email Kirby and ask what the mother of millenium So weighed. I bet more than 1200. There is a difference between good cows weighing 1200 and sorry big cows weighing 1200. If they are like the ones you posted it dosn't take a very big cow to weigh alot.
So in answer to the topic those that want to raise Bulls Like millenium use 1500 pound cows.
 

ollie

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I know from experience that some associations can measure the same bull from 4.8 fs to 6.0 within the show year. I think growth paterns of different individuals hit different spots on the fs stick. Once they are mature you can get a more accurate measurement.
 
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