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Why is Grassfed Better than Organic?

edrsimms

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This may come as a surprise to those people who equate “organic” with “more nutritious.” Alas, this is not always true. For the most part, the term “organic” is simply a guarantee of what the food does not contain. You can be reasonably assured it will not contain any of those six syllable chemicals you can’t pronounce. But organic food can still be deficient in nutrients or loaded with sugar and “bad” fat. An organic label does not guarantee good nutrition.

When a ruminant is taken off pasture and fattened on grain, it loses a number of valuable nutrients. For example, compared with grassfed meat, grainfed meat has only one quarter as much vitamin E, one-eighth as much beta-carotene, and one-third as many omega-3 fatty acids. It doesn’t matter whether the animal is fed ordinary grain, genetically modified grain, or organic grain. Feeding large amounts of any type of grain to a grazing animal will have this effect simply because grain has fewer of these nutrients than fresh pasture.

Compared with grassfed products, organic grainfed products are also relatively deficient in a cancer-fighting fat called “CLA.” When you feed a ruminant grain --- even as little as 2 pounds a day --- its production of CLA plummets. CLA may be one of the most potent cancer-fighting substances in our diet. In animal studies, as little as one half of one percent CLA in the diet has reduced tumor burden by more than 50 percent.


The underlying problem is that grain makes the digestive tract of a ruminant abnormally acid. This acidic environment causes the E.coli to multiply and to become more acid-resistant. According to a recent study published in the journal Science, these altered bacteria are much more likely to survive the cleansing acidity of your digestive juices and make you ill.


Choose grass-fed beef over organic!
 

Bez+

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This may come as a surprise to those people who equate “organic” with “more nutritious.” Alas, this is not always true.

According to a long term British study that was recently released - and no I cannot put a URL to it - you are correct.

Be that as it may:

Why is Grassfed Better than Organic?

Raised right my answer would be - "It might be, but it might not be either"

I place no more faith in organic than I place in grass fed - simply because I have been in the game far too long to allow a blanket statement like yours to carry full credence

Bez+
 

novatech

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Ed.
I wake up very early in the morning. If I turn my radio on about all I here is somebody trying to sell me on something my body needs to prevent something I never had a problem with. If I turn on the TV I get the same load of crap. CT is the one place I thought I could get away from that. Well just like cancer you have proven it can show up anywhere.
 

talldog

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Bez+":26wyyq0a said:
This may come as a surprise to those people who equate “organic” with “more nutritious.” Alas, this is not always true.

According to a long term British study that was recently released - and no I cannot put a URL to it - you are correct.

Be that as it may:

Why is Grassfed Better than Organic?

Raised right my answer would be - "It might be, but it might not be either"

I place no more faith in organic than I place in grass fed - simply because I have been in the game far too long to allow a blanket statement like yours to carry full credence

Bez+
Well Said ! :tiphat:
 

brandonm_13

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I think the best thing that most of us can do is just raise our livestock with a little common sense, and not just rely on what everyone else is telling us. Usually they have a motive behind their "help."
 

grannysoo

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novatech":9xuk2ku8 said:
Ed.

Well just like cancer you have proven it can show up anywhere.

And keep coming back over and over again.

By the way, Tractor Supply just got in some big new shiny belt buckles....
 

djinwa

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brandonm_13":zzuj9cdm said:
I think the best thing that most of us can do is just raise our livestock with a little common sense, and not just rely on what everyone else is telling us. Usually they have a motive behind their "help."

I guess everyone's common sense is different. Mine tells me that feeding nearly all grain ration to a ruminant is not a good idea. Acidosis, rumenitis and ulceration, liver abscesses, etc. I once read in Merck Veterinary Manual that up to 40% of cattle at slaughter had liver abscesses as the result of high grain diets.

Of course, feeding grain is cheaper, at least as long as there is cheap energy to produce and ship it, and haul the cattle to the feedlots from all over the country.
 

SRBeef

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When I was first starting to look for some cattle to buy, I visited one seller's herd where he was constantly telling me these were "organic" cows.... (I've never seen an "inorganic" cow but that's an engineer joke)

Well they may have been "organic" by the label but they sure looked sick, even to a beginner like me. Pink eye in some, lots of snotty, runny noses and heads held down...

We need to get away from thinking purely in terms of labels and use common sense. There are a whole range of practices that could be called "grassfed" also.

I have settled on a system most would call "natural beef" but even that is a label with a wide range of interpretations and practices.

In the end, I raise beef the way I would like to buy beef for my family, including myself and my kids, if I could find it, be sure of it and afford it.

Good, clean, healthy, tasty and nutritious beef purchased from a person you know who raised them from calving to processing doesn't need a label.

jmho.

Jim
 

Brandonm22

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I won't pay more for Organic, grassfed, all natural, Angus, Wagyu, Hereford, Laura's Lean, Texas Longhorn or any other branding gimic. Beef is a commodity like apples, onions, pork bellies, tomatos, spaghetti, corn meal, or chicken wings. If yall can con some dummy into paying more for the product than it is worth, well done! Don't expect me to ever believe the sales pitch though.
 

brandonm_13

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Well, I've been in some of these hog and chicken houses, and I have to say that I would gladly pay more for hogs and chickens the way I raise them. Not all of it is a gimmick. Sometimes it's just plain better.
 

whitecow

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Brandonm22":2lj3i5x6 said:
I won't pay more for Organic, grassfed, all natural, Angus, Wagyu, Hereford, Laura's Lean, Texas Longhorn or any other branding gimic. Beef is a commodity like apples, onions, pork bellies, tomatos, spaghetti, corn meal, or chicken wings. If yall can con some dummy into paying more for the product than it is worth, well done! Don't expect me to ever believe the sales pitch though.

I agree with you as far as most branded products or maketing schemes, except for Wagyu. I've eaten it a few times. It is way different than any other beef. I would eat it every day, if I could afford it. Wagyu cattle are definitely ugly....kinda like a Jersey x Corriente cross....but that is by far the best steak I have ever had.
 

HerefordSire

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whitecow":278e3tom said:
Brandonm22":278e3tom said:
I won't pay more for Organic, grassfed, all natural, Angus, Wagyu, Hereford, Laura's Lean, Texas Longhorn or any other branding gimic. Beef is a commodity like apples, onions, pork bellies, tomatos, spaghetti, corn meal, or chicken wings. If yall can con some dummy into paying more for the product than it is worth, well done! Don't expect me to ever believe the sales pitch though.

I agree with you as far as most branded products or maketing schemes, except for Wagyu. I've eaten it a few times. It is way different than any other beef. I would eat it every day, if I could afford it. Wagyu cattle are definitely ugly....kinda like a Jersey x Corriente cross....but that is by far the best steak I have ever had.

Is McDonalds going to only use Wagyu? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

Brandonm22

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brandonm_13":bcl5fdmi said:
Well, I've been in some of these hog and chicken houses, and I have to say that I would gladly pay more for hogs and chickens the way I raise them. Not all of it is a gimmick. Sometimes it's just plain better.

"been in", I have spent YEARS working in some of those hog houses and have been around the chicken houses all my life. I got no problem at all with eating either product. I certainly am not paying extra for bacon or pork chops. I have raised my own chickens (and still have ten birds); but around here chicken breasts are a $1.00 a lb and eggs are 78 cents a dozen at Food Giant. I won't pretend for ten seconds that I can grow them for that.
 

brandonm_13

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"Been in" meant I have worked in chicken houses, and I've seen some of the nasty stuff they eat, the ammonia, dust, and fecal material in the air they breathe. It's not healthy to be in, whether you're a chicken or a human. That's why they have to run more antibiotics in their feed and water. Some of the antibiotics that are in the big facilities are getting into the water system and they're even finding it in fish.

I can produce chicken fairly cheap and healthy. You can raise a chicken to laying age on about $5 in feed. That's 20 weeks. They only need to be raised to 8 weeks for meat processing. That's about $2 per bird in feed. Even by doubling the feed cost, you're looking at around $4 per 3-4 pound processed bird. That's not too bad.
 

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