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rowdyred

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My dad's name is English and my mom's name is German.
Both families were in North Carolina. My moms family headed out to California for the gold fields, while going through North Mississippi, one of the wagon wheels broke. This happened in a place called Silver Springs Bottom. The Patriarch of the family decided since they didn't have a spare, they would just live here. My family still owns land in Silver Springs Bottom.
Don't know how my dads family got here, just glad they did!
Have a great day!
 

Rafter S

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I still live within 10 miles of where my father's folks settled after getting off the boat from Prussia in Galveston, around 1870. My mother's folks came from Germany a few years later and settled about 50 miles farther west. Both parents grew up speaking German, although different dialects.
 

M-5

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AT the FLORIDA STATE line checking papers
From my research one branch goes back to 1320 Norfolk England and those decendants came to the new world 3 centuries later, It seams the family tree blossomed in North Carolina and spread into south GA plantations and eventually the panhandle florida. my maternal side has Penobscot maine as the origin but was best know as the Coweta creek tribal nation east.
 

Nesikep

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Born in Switzerland, parents moved to Canada when I was 3.. moved around for 8 years until we found this place.. My dad's cousins (which he didn't really know) moved over to Alberta a few years earlier and started a dairy, then retired and moved considerably closer to us... we meet up once in a while now
 

Bigfoot

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Great thread!!
I live in Christian County Ky. After the revolutionary war, this was as far west as you could go, and still be on US soil. My Great ? Grandfather was with the original 21 settlers to this area. Came with people he served with in the revolution, including someone from Jefferson Davis family. Both families still have relatives living here. My great ? grandfather was the preacher for the group. All came to raise tobacco, and make whiskey (evidently whiskey was much like currencey. Land from the original land grant, is still owned by us.
 

HDRider

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My family came from England to Long Island NY in the late 1600s. The first born American moved to the Hillsborough NC area in the early 1700s.

From NC they moved to the middle western part of TN. From TN they went to TX. There is a county in TX, smack dab in the middle with the family name.

From TX they moved to Arkansas.

We accumulated a smattering of different bloodlines along the way.

It seems my folks did not like crowds. Every time an appreciable number of people accumulated, my people moved on to another wilderness area.

Here I sit in a very underpopulated part of America.
 

Caustic Burno

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Name is from the Norsemen migrated from Scotland to the colonies in the 1600's original family farm is in Wolf Den Maryland. Started migrating south ended up in Texas after the Revolution from land grants issued to ancestors that died in the Alamo.
 

Caustic Burno

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M-5":yv2hh1it said:
From my research one branch goes back to 1320 Norfolk England and those decendants came to the new world 3 centuries later, It seams the family tree blossomed in North Carolina and spread into south GA plantations and eventually the panhandle florida. my maternal side has Penobscot maine as the origin but was best know as the Coweta creek tribal nation east.

The Penobscot actually made the first compound bow it really quite a feat of engineering for the time.
 

M-5

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Caustic Burno":33ijwfj1 said:
M-5":33ijwfj1 said:
From my research one branch goes back to 1320 Norfolk England and those decendants came to the new world 3 centuries later, It seams the family tree blossomed in North Carolina and spread into south GA plantations and eventually the panhandle florida. my maternal side has Penobscot maine as the origin but was best know as the Coweta creek tribal nation east.

The Penobscot actually made the first compound bow it really quite a feat of engineering for the time.

he was my 5th great grandfather

Joseph Islands
Back in Georgia, a century ago, a little Creek Indian boy was permitted by his father to live with a Baptist white man who sent the lad to Sunday school with his own children. He learned to read and write and speak the English language. That boy was Joseph Islands who came with the Creeks when they moved West. In trying to lead a seeker to the light, he found the way himself and they rejoiced together. There was then, at North Fork Town, no church or pastor, but Joseph took his Bible which the white man in Georgia had given him, and read it from house to house. He exhorted the people more than two years, praying that God would send some one to administer the ordinances. He was ordained himself in 1845 by Ramsay Potts and Joseph Smedley, missionaries in the Choctaw Nation. At that time, while believers were being persecuted in the Creek Nation, these missionaries would visit that

[p. 50]
section occasionally and baptize converts on the Choctaw side of the river.
At a Creek Council in 1845 a chief made a long speech in favor of enforcing the law against praying. "When God made all things he made white people and black people to pray but he never required the Indian to pray to him." Another Indian, not a Christian, arose and said: "The chief who has just addressed you spoke angrily about the praying people and warmly insisted that the law against them should be enforced, but he never once alluded to whiskey nor to those who drink it. When God made all things he made white people and black people to drink whiskey, but he never made his red children to get drunk on bitter water. Whiskey is doing the Creek man more harm than preaching and praying. Now stop and consult on the whiskey law." The case was carried over to the next council. The first chief who spoke was afterwards baptized by H. F. Buckner.

Joseph Islands left a good house and moved into a small log cabin and gave the better house for a place of worship. The American Indian Missionary Association offered him $50 for his services, but he declined at that time to accept it, for fear such gift might prejudice the unsaved Indians against him. All about him Indian converts were being whipped. He was threatened but went on with his work undismayed. For several years he served as pastor of the North Fork Church. He made a profound impression on the Creek Nation. His genuine Christian character and his courageous spirit broke the force of the persecutions and a great revival swept through the Creek Nation. On March 8, 1848, a few months before Buckner came on the field, Joseph Islands answered the call of his Lord, "Come home."
 

FlyingLSimmentals

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Mine is a lot like Bigfoot's my ??grandfather was awarded ???acres for his service in the Revolutionary War. Except I'm in Caldwell County. Proudly today we still have a portion of those acres in the family. There were way too many girls in the generations after that and lots of it was lost that way.
 

Aaron

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Dad's family came from Finland in 1912 and 1928. Maternal family went to Ironwood, MI and farmed for a while and went back to Finland in 1920 and then back to Thunder Bay, ON in 1928. Paternal side came in 1928 to Thunder Bay and stayed. Dad moved here from Thunder Bay in 1974.

Mom maternal side came to Prince Edward Island in 1790 and founded town of Cavendish, PEI. Eventually made their way to southwestern Ontario to the Sarnia area and the family exploded in growth. Branched out in every direction. Have family from that side in Florida, Missouri, Michigan, Ohio, New York, North Dakota and other states I am forgetting. One son moved his family here and stayed.

Mom paternal side, 3 brothers, came from Poland in 1902 to Cleveland. Two came to Manitoba and one eventually to here, one brother stayed in Detroit. Family branched out to Michigan, Manitoba, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, Minnesota, Wisconsin, California, Texas, Ohio, Alberta, British Columbia and probably other states I am forgetting.

Pretty much have family in every jurisdiction of North America. I do a lot of genealogy, so I try to get into contact with every branch of the family.
 

True Grit Farms

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My mom's family came here through Ellis Island from Norway, and ended up on an Indian reservation in northern Wisconsin. My dad's side came through Ellis Island from France and Italy after WW1. They were slaves and peasants and taken prisoner during the war, and by the grace of God somehow ended up in the US of A. My grandparents never owned a house or any property in their lifetime's. But I sure wish I had their drive and ambitions.
 

callmefence

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Only know about moms side.


Family migrated to central Texas from Kentucky before the civil war. Settled ,farmed ran a mill and store at Gabriel mills ( also known as brizendine mills.) Family cemetery is still located there. Just down the road. Great grandfather bought the place I live on now, grandfather added to it .

My great aunt has a book published..The Brizendines of Gabriel mills.
 

Boot Jack Bulls

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Great topic!

My mom's side of the family is Norwegian and Irish. The Irish side has been researched and traced all the way back to William Best in 1300ish. When my relatives on that side of the family came to the US from Ireland in the late 1800s, they settled in a valley in NW WI that is to this day named after the family, and the original homestead is about 2 miles from my brother's farm. Actually, his farm shares a eastern boundary with a cemetery where some of the original immigrants in my family are buried, along with most of the following generations.

My father's side was German and French. My dad's paternal grandmother immigrated from Germany as a child with her family to Oklahoma. They lived in a sod house and used buffalo chips for fuel. My great grandmother was about 100 when I was a child, and she used to tell me stories about her life as a sod buster. The kids actually rode the spare plow mule to school each day. That part of my family then moved up to Wisconsin and bought some very rough land up in this part of the state that is still in my family to this day.

I have extensive information on two of my grandparents, but the other two not so much (French and Norweigen). It is something I hope to explore more in the future.
 

cow pollinater

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Both sides came to the US in the 1600's. My father's side made it to CA as some of the first white people to have land deeded to them. My mothers side came from the thicket in TX and only made it to CA after a neighbor that was leaving town kidnapped my granddad as a small child to save him from the beatings. Up until the day he died he swore that uncle Jesse (as in James) was still alive and living in Farmersville CA.
We left seven generations in CA to come to OK. I let history hold me there for a while but finally I thought "what better way to honor pioneers than to go somewhere better myself".
I met an old timer a while back that stopped in while I was out pruning my little kitchen orchard that told me about how special it was that I had an Elberta peach as his family had picked them in CA during the dust bowl. I told him they were pretty special to me as well since they were developed on my families ground. Turns out some of his family had worked with mine 1,800 miles away.
 

Dubcharo

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My ancestor (Dubuc) arrived at Quebec, Canada from France in 1668. One in the line is the fonder of the town Dubuque in Iowa. He was born in Quebec in 1762.
 

Bestoutwest

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Caustic Burno":2buuo30f said:
M-5":2buuo30f said:
From my research one branch goes back to 1320 Norfolk England and those decendants came to the new world 3 centuries later, It seams the family tree blossomed in North Carolina and spread into south GA plantations and eventually the panhandle florida. my maternal side has Penobscot maine as the origin but was best know as the Coweta creek tribal nation east.

The Penobscot actually made the first compound bow it really quite a feat of engineering for the time.

I grew up in Old Town, ME which is where the Penobscot tribe is located. Growing up our mascot was the Indians, but has since been changed in out PC culture.
 
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