where to attach hitching ring in trailer

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Anonymous

We have just built a trailer for our family cow. The walls are about 46" tall. I read that her lead should be long enough for her to lie down. When I've transported her in horse trailers she hasn't had a lead that long. I will not be bringing her on long trips. 90% of the time it will be 1/2 hour trips. The longest trip I ever expect to bring her on (once a year) will be a 3 hour trip. Right now she is a 39" tall calf. Do I put the hitching ring more at nose level or lower so she can still lay down with a shorter lead? Thanks for the wealth of information that exists for someone like me on this site.

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Anonymous

What is th ereson for tying her at all?

dunmovin

> We have just built a trailer for
> our family cow. The walls are
> about 46" tall. I read that
> her lead should be long enough for
> her to lie down. When I've
> transported her in horse trailers
> she hasn't had a lead that long. I
> will not be bringing her on long
> trips. 90% of the time it will be
> 1/2 hour trips. The longest trip I
> ever expect to bring her on (once
> a year) will be a 3 hour trip.
> Right now she is a 39" tall
> calf. Do I put the hitching ring
> more at nose level or lower so she
> can still lay down with a shorter
> lead? Thanks for the wealth of
> information that exists for
> someone like me on this site.
 
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A

Anonymous

This is why I come to you guys :) Our trailer is about 4' wide and about 6 1/2' long. I thought she would need to be tied to keep her from being unstable in there. Maybe even flipping the trailer if she turned around or lost her footing. The trailer is rated for 6,000 #. Thanks again, dun. You have been incredible with all the questions I ask. Someday I hope I have 40+ years experience (although I'll be hitting 90 by then!)

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Anonymous

I think show folk tie there stock when hauling,they could aswer the height question. Unless the cow cows totally nuts, the usually settle in pretty well and don't shift around alot. If she falls over that's more a reflection on your driving, but incidents do occur that can cause a problem, i.e., idiot cuts you off, slick patch on road, etc. We've never tied ours, but we try to load them so that they don't have a lot of movement room, but enough that they don't over heat.

dun

> This is why I come to you guys :)
> Our trailer is about 4' wide and
> about 6 1/2' long. I thought she
> would need to be tied to keep her
> from being unstable in there.
> Maybe even flipping the trailer if
> she turned around or lost her
> footing. The trailer is rated for
> 6,000 #. Thanks again, dun. You
> have been incredible with all the
> questions I ask. Someday I hope I
> have 40+ years experience
> (although I'll be hitting 90 by
> then!)
 
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A

Anonymous

We never tie our cattle in the trailer. One thing you want to be careful of is the calf. If we are transporting cows and calves, we shut the middle door to keep them separate. It's possible for mom to shift, stumble or fall and hurt the baby. In your case, (it sounds like you don't have a door)I might tie the cow so that baby doesn't get smooshed.
 
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A

Anonymous

We always tie our show animals in the trailer, especially the larger ones. They don't move around as much that way, and we can usually put more in the trailer. If we have alot of room we will tie the cows and steers up front and leave the calves loose in the back. We absolutely do not give them enough rope to lie down. This can be dangerous to them if they lay down and another cow should move and step on them or fall on her. If they are small they can also get the lead around their neck and hang themselves. We tie them to the bars along the side of the trailers and turn them in the trailer so they are standing the width of the trailer.

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