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when/how to tie a calf to "train" his neck for showing

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mark

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I've seen some people tie their cattle with their heads up, and when they walk the calves or stand in the ring, these cattle hold their heads up nicely without any pressure on the halter at all.

When/how far ahead of a show do you do this?
Is this somethig that should be started when they are very young?
Is there any negative health issues with this for the calf?
 

Ryan

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I have never seen any negative side effect to tying with the animals' head up.

For best results tie it up at the level that you want the animal to hold its head while showing. I do it as part of the daily routine. Tie them standing for awhile, then tie them where they can lay down for a while before letting them loose for the day. The thread titled "some Show related questions" covered this topic some. If you read over that you can read some more input on the subject.

Ryan
 

iowahawkeyes

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When you first start tying them up be sure to be around them in case something would happen. They get used to it within a few days. We'll tie for 2-3 hours at a time. It's a good time to brush and work hair.
 

LoveMoo11

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I start doing it when I start halter training-in fact, its the first thing I do. Tie the head up for a few hours. Make sure it is tight and secure, but not so tight that the calf is in pain, obviously. Keep an eye on them, sometimes they will try to lie down and end up trying to hang themselves instead, so use a quick release not. I always give them a reward, like a small handful of grain, afterwards so they look at it as a positive experience.
 

mark

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thanks for the replies.

I want to clarify my question. The tying I'm talking about is tying them high enough that their jawbone near the mouth rests on TOP of the dividers between the stalls at the show. There is no room for the calf to move. Their noses are pointed up at a good 45 degree angle or better toward the roof.

When their daughter leads them, she can drop the rope and they walk behind her with their necks extended like you were holding their heads up in the ring with the chain halter.

It appears the calves are comfortable when tied this. They don't struggle at all. I wondered if one is to try this if you must start doing so at a very young age, or if it is a "couple of weeks prior to the show" training.
 

LoveMoo11

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yeah, it sounds like you are tying them up about right. You can start doing it whenever you want, but personally, I do it when I start halter training them, that way they learn from the get go
 

iowahawkeyes

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Here's a pic.
 
A

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Hi Mark,
We do not tie the head up high when we first start tying them up. The most important thing is for them to understand how the rope/ halter works. They can really injure themselves when they are straining with the head up. Front legs can go in between panels pretty easy and if they go down with their head snubbed up tight and high...well it would just be really bad. So my suggestion is to tie the head lose and top line level (back level) up until they have calmed down a lot and stand good...then you won't have any probs! I personally would rather not take the chance of any injuries to you or the calf when you have spent so much time and money on a nice beef project.

Another thing...When the head is tied high and tight in the beginning, there is constant pressure on the calves head. They learn to associate the halter with pain, and they can become very hard to catch. You want them to learn to "give" with pressure, not fear it. When the head is tied low and lose, they learn to stand and take a step forward and waallah! The pressure is gone;)
Standing good / tied low = no pressure Fighting the rope / tied high = lots of pressure

Everybody does this different, just do what you think woul work best! Good luck and have loads of fun :nod:
 

mark

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The ones I'm talking about would have the calves chin resting on the rail above the Herefords noses in the photo, or possibly clear up to the top rail if they could reach it.

Seems like a lot of overkill, but like I noted earlier, this group has "trained" cattle in and out of the ring, and their young daughter can drape a rope over her shoulder with no pressure and the cattle follow her with their nose pointed forward/up. Whatever they're doing works. I just don't want to try to copy the wrong way or time and injury my animals.

thanks again.
 

grand chaser09

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mark":2zre4ogw said:
The ones I'm talking about would have the calves chin resting on the rail above the Herefords noses in the photo, or possibly clear up to the top rail if they could reach it.

Seems like a lot of overkill, but like I noted earlier, this group has "trained" cattle in and out of the ring, and their young daughter can drape a rope over her shoulder with no pressure and the cattle follow her with their nose pointed forward/up. Whatever they're doing works. I just don't want to try to copy the wrong way or time and injury my animals.

thanks again.
Personally i don't tie my calves heads up any higher than the herfords in the pic. and mine will follow me almost anywhere without pressure.
 
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Anonymous

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grand chaser09":3rbsevwj said:
mark":3rbsevwj said:
The ones I'm talking about would have the calves chin resting on the rail above the Herefords noses in the photo, or possibly clear up to the top rail if they could reach it.

Seems like a lot of overkill, but like I noted earlier, this group has "trained" cattle in and out of the ring, and their young daughter can drape a rope over her shoulder with no pressure and the cattle follow her with their nose pointed forward/up. Whatever they're doing works. I just don't want to try to copy the wrong way or time and injury my animals.

thanks again.
Personally i don't tie my calves heads up any higher than the herfords in the pic. and mine will follow me almost anywhere without pressure.

I was just talking about in the beginning ;-) And when you pull on the rope to walk / step forward...you are applying pressure under the chin, if pulling really hard pressure is also applied behind the ears.
:nod:
 

Cowboy 2.0

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Typically when a calf rests their head on a rail they tend to get a heavy head and don't want to keep it up. What we have always done and work greak is get a short peice of chain and a bicycle intertube and hang the tube with the chain from the ceiling. Put it in the middle of a stall and tie them at show height to it. When they try to pull down the tube pulls them right back up and they learn to keep their head at that height. Out calves stand in the barn for at least 4-5 hours a day. Builds endurance for a long show day.
 
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