What would you do?

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ShuterSunset

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What would you do if you sold a bull that had been semen checked ok, and he turned up sterile like 5 months later? How would you go about making it up with the guy you sold him to? Does it make a difference if he didn't catch the problem until the end of the breeding season and all of his cows were open when he had the vet come out to sleeve them. Been on the buying end of that one before and trying to make some contingency plans in case it happens the other way. I figure if you sell enough cattle, things like that are bound to happen eventually. Even to the best of us.
 
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Had that happen. My contract to buyers is if the bull is injured or comes up sterile in the first year, they have the option of being reimbursed or get a new bull free the next year. I also send the papers on the collection proving he was ok with the contract, to make sure they can't say he was sterile when they got him. I keep copies of both documents also. As the seller, I might want to have the bull tested again, just to make sure that he wasn't exhausted if the guy was using one bull on too many cows, especially if he was young.
 

randiliana

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Well, here is an experience that we had.

We bought a yearling Red Angus bull in a sale. He tested good. We turned him out with 15 - 20 cows (can't remember for sure now). After a couple cycles we noticed that we had lots of cows that were cycling, and finally I watched him breed a cow. He could not get it in the cow. His extension was too short, and he was not breeding huge cows. We had him semen checked again, just to be sure, and he tested 92%. The next spring we didn't get 1 calf out of him.

The guy we bought the bull from gave us a full credit of his purchase price for the next sale, took the bull back, put him in with some cows that were dry and watched. Same thing happened there, he could not breed a cow. By the time we realized we had a problem it was 6-7 months after we bought the bull, bought him in Feb, and realized we had a problem in late July/early August.

But for the question you asked specifically, I'm not sure exactly how you would handle that. Could be he got hurt, wasn't fed properly (starved), or got a disease. I think that this should probably be treated no differently than if the bull tested no good before the next breeding season. I wouldn't expect a breeder to refund my purchase at that point.
 

bigbull338

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i raise reg beefmasters.an if i sale a bull privately or though an assoc sale.i have to stand behind the bull for 1yr.as stated by the BBU rules.if i sold a bull that went bad id do 1 of 2 things.1 is replace the bull at no cost.2 give the buyer back his money.an then sale the bull for weigh price.
 

Frankie

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ShuterSunset":184jeqr7 said:
What would you do if you sold a bull that had been semen checked ok, and he turned up sterile like 5 months later? How would you go about making it up with the guy you sold him to? Does it make a difference if he didn't catch the problem until the end of the breeding season and all of his cows were open when he had the vet come out to sleeve them. Been on the buying end of that one before and trying to make some contingency plans in case it happens the other way. I figure if you sell enough cattle, things like that are bound to happen eventually. Even to the best of us.

If you plan to stay in the registered business, you just have to replace the bull or refund the buyer's money. It may be the buyer's fault, but you need to try to make him happy. And be greateful that he came to you with the problem instead of the local coffeeshop.
 

Dana Kopp

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A BSE doesn't check libido. He could have the best result possible on a BSE but if the bull has no desire then it doesn't do you any good. We had that happen two years ago, all of our first calf heifers and two cows - about 15 head were open. Not a single one was bred, a major bummer. The heifers were virgins when they were turned out and remained so until the next year...

Isn't checking extension length part of the BSE?
 

bigag03

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twistedxranch":37kqzodw said:
Dana Kopp":37kqzodw said:
A BSE doesn't check libido. He could have the best result possible on a BSE but if the bull has no desire then it doesn't do you any good. We had that happen two years ago, all of our first calf heifers and two cows - about 15 head were open. Not a single one was bred, a major bummer. The heifers were virgins when they were turned out and remained so until the next year...

Isn't checking extension length part of the BSE?

I do believe so as well as scrotal circumference.

No, extension length is NOT part of a BSE. You will never get full extension using an ej and even if he is long enough, doesn't mean he knows what to do with it. My best advice when you buy a new bull is to synchronize at least a few head and watch him breed them. Some bulls aren't interested, some mount and don't have the extension, some mount and pre-ejaculate, and I have even seen some mount, but not be aggressive enough to find the hole.

P.S. Sorry for participating in hijacking the thread.
To answer your question...with exception of gross negligence on the part of the buyer, guarantee for a year.
 

Brandonm22

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Mark Gardiner said he replaces about 10-12% of the bulls he sells a year (I am going off memory here but I think that was the %age). It is expensive; but he says that is just the cost of being in the bull business. I have a friend who bought a bull from Cow Creek that absolutely fell apart. He went from $2850 at their sale to $540 at our stockyard and didn't get half the cows bred. Chuck knows what he is doing so I have no real explanation for what happened. Cow Creek made it good and the guy is happy with the bull he has now.
 

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