What should I do?

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jdot

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Ok so here's the situation. I have thirteen acres that I want to renovate next year. I am thinking about planting Texas Tuff bermuda grass because I have seen what it can do and I like it, but I'm not opposed to something else. I had the soil soil tested and it is low in nitrogen. I have a sandly loam type soil and live in Central Texas. My question is, Should I plant some type of legume this fall to help with the nitrogen levels or use a commercial fertilizer this fall or use fertilizer in the spring? (Oops I think thats 3 questions) I don't want to waste money on a legume just to plow it when I plant. Or would it go to seed by then and be ok? All suggestions are welcome and I thank you for them now. However I don't want to start a debate on grass fed vs. grain fed or organic vs. not organic. I just want some feedback on what will work the best. thanks to all. :compute:


BTW I have horses that will occasionally graze this land so if legumes are not good for them then I will aviod that option.
 

1982vett

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How much acreage are we talking about and what are your primary goals for the grass?

I planted Texas Tuff in 2005 and don't really want to knock it. But if I were to do it again, I'd plant the pure Giant Bermuda. Might consider Rancho Frio which is 15.50% Giant Bermuda, 5.25% Regular Cheyenne Bermuda, 3.25% SWI-810 Bermuda (Cheyenne II)and 30.00% Mohawk Bermuda and hope the Mohawk doesn't establish. (It didn't with the Texas Tuff)...............Yes, the missing 45% is coating materials. ;-)

I'm on blackland instead of sand but I think I'd get the land ready this fall, plant some oats or something to hold the soil and use for winter grazing. Then in early spring plow it under and get the seed bed for the bermuda ready. Get the bermuda established and next fall start adding the clovers.
 

bird dog

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Do you need lime? If so, fix that this winter or early spring before you spend money on fertilizer. After that I would plow and sprig in early spring with Jiggs sprigs if you can find them. They dig a lot of them around Waco but they go fast. Welcome to the forum.
 

BeefmasterB

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1982vett":1f2ocq1c said:
How much acreage are we talking about and what are your primary goals for the grass?

I planted Texas Tuff in 2005 and don't really want to knock it. But if I were to do it again, I'd plant the pure Giant Bermuda. Might consider Rancho Frio which is 15.50% Giant Bermuda, 5.25% Regular Cheyenne Bermuda, 3.25% SWI-810 Bermuda (Cheyenne II)and 30.00% Mohawk Bermuda and hope the Mohawk doesn't establish. (It didn't with the Texas Tuff)...............Yes, the missing 45% is coating materials. ;-)

I'm on blackland instead of sand but I think I'd get the land ready this fall, plant some oats or something to hold the soil and use for winter grazing. Then in early spring plow it under and get the seed bed for the bermuda ready. Get the bermuda established and next fall start adding the clovers.


Yep, no point in wasting the clover by plowing it under. The only thing I might question is the bermuda seed mix. I keep hearing that a lot of it reverts back to Common with the exception of Cheyenne, after a few years. Did yours ever convert back? I like birdogs idea of Jiggs because it's incredibly agressive and pretty decent in protein value.

I plan to work some soil in a similar way, fairly soon. Work the soil now, fertilize to recommendation, plant the jiggs if there's still time and overseed with clover. Still waiting on moisture!
 

1982vett

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BeefmasterB":1tk1e9z9 said:
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Did yours ever convert back?
Not yet. Apparently, Giant seems to be more drought hardy than Common so it is giving the Common a run for its money. Also seems to green up earlier. I think it would do fine if it didn't have to compete with the Common.
 

novatech

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There are 4 pastures and hay meadows in a row, 2 being mine. The first is Texas Tough, the second is Alicia, the third is Kalie giant the fourth is Tif 85. We are in what I would say is severe drought. The tif 85 is by far doing the best, being the only thing green in the meadow. The Alecia and Kalie are OK, still green but wilting. The Texas tough is a step above the common. A total of 3" rain sents may. If you happen to be comming throu, PM me and would be glad to show you.
As far as the clover is concerned it will be the best money you ever spent, but don't plowit under. Let it reseed.
Watch the videos by Gene Sollock on U-Tube to learn more.
 
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