What Breed

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Beefy

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it makes sense to me to start a registered herd of something that compliments angus well.
 

Texan

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cowboy13":39ossd8c said:
What breed would be the best to start a registered with.

Probably depends on your location more than any other single factor that I can think of. That appears to be a mystery. Maybe you could give us a clue?
 

TexasCountryWoman

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If you only have a little bit of land , raise something fairly rare. If you have more land, raise what looks attractive too you. If you have alot of land, you need a foreman that knows ranching and beef cattle. In any case, pick a docile breed.
 

Texan

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cowboy13":16g16tgm said:
I live in East Tx

In that case, Beefy's advice would be hard to beat. Personally, if I had to choose something, it would probably be something Continental. Maybe some of the registered breeders can offer up some more help for you. How about it guys?

By the way, welcome to the board!
 

txag

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to help determine a breed for your area, there are several things you can look for. what kind of purebred or registered breeders are already in your area? this question is important for several reasons. one is obviously, what is your competition? if there is already a really big, well-known, reputable breeder (of, we'll say maybe charolais for example), it might be hard to establish a client base because folks are already familiar with the other breeder.

another suggestion i'd have would be to visit the sale barns & see which calves are popular in your area. you might even visit with some of the farmers, ranchers, and/or order buyers in attendance & question their preferences although be prepared to get a different answer from each person polled :) .

the main thing is to have a plan. how many head to you plan to run. do you plan to market bulls, females, both?

keep in mind that registered herds have some extra costs that commercial herds don't. registration papers, marketing, show expenses (if you choose that route), sale consignment fees. they can also have more intensive management involved.....weighing at birth, weaning & possibly yearling, ultrasound data collection to name a few.
 

dun

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txag":1z8gj9cj said:
to help determine a breed for your area, there are several things you can look for. what kind of purebred or registered breeders are already in your area? this question is important for several reasons. one is obviously, what is your competition? if there is already a really big, well-known, reputable breeder (of, we'll say maybe charolais for example), it might be hard to establish a client base because folks are already familiar with the other breeder.

another suggestion i'd have would be to visit the sale barns & see which calves are popular in your area. you might even visit with some of the farmers, ranchers, and/or order buyers in attendance & question their preferences although be prepared to get a different answer from each person polled :) .

the main thing is to have a plan. how many head to you plan to run. do you plan to market bulls, females, both?

keep in mind that registered herds have some extra costs that commercial herds don't. registration papers, marketing, show expenses (if you choose that route), sale consignment fees. they can also have more intensive management involved.....weighing at birth, weaning & possibly yearling, ultrasound data collection to name a few.

One possible advantage to getting your genetics from a large well established breeder in your area is the possibility of marketing your replacement quality bulls and heifers through them. Some of the larger seedstock producers also have buying/marketing programs that can help you market your calves with/through them.

dun
 

Frankie

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cowboy13":14eskmeo said:
What breed would be the best to start a registered with.

Some good answers here, but give Angus some consideration. The demand for Angus in Arkansas and Louisiana has been growing the last few years. There are two Associations in East Texas, ALOT and the East Texas Assn. You can find info on both groups at the texasangus.com site (no www.). They both have several sales each year to market member's registered cattle. Good luck...
 

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