What a good price for a yearling ?

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radd57

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I"ve just moved to a small farm,my neighbor wants to sell me a calf at yearling cost.I'm new at this, so please explain why he wont sell me the calf .Whats up with waiting a year?
Its a male, with mostly red body,with red and white face,what type of cattle is this.Sorry i'm not up with breeds,and don't know the lingo.
I don't want to get ripped off.And is there some website that explains all about buying beef,what to buy and not to buy?
I live out of the portland oregon area, and have no clue to what a calf or yearling goes $$$ for.
radd57
 

la4angus

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Red body and red and white face. Could be a cross between Hereford and Red Angus. Could be a cross with Simmental, Gelbvieh, Hereford, and/or Red Angus.

Here is the latest prices from Klamath Falls, Ore.

Klamath Livestock Auction, Klamath Falls, OR Tue 04/27/04

Receipts: This Week 247; Last Week 384; Last Year 208

Compared to last week: Feeder steers and heifers steady.
Feeder cows 2.00-4.00 higher. Stock cows steady. Slaughter cows
steady to firm. Slaughter bulls steady. Demand for feeder cattle
good and moderate to good for slaughter cows. Receipts include 57
percent feeder cattle, 29 percent slaughter cows, and 14 percent
stock cows. In the feeder class 57 percent steers and 43 percent
heifers with 36 percent weighing over 600 lbs.

Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1

Head Weight Avg Wt Price Avg Price

7 456 - 463 460 111.50 - 114.00 112.94

22 543 - 546 545 111.00 - 111.50 111.25

8 656 - 667 662 97.50 - 102.00 99.77

5 715 715 93.76 93.76

8 802 - 821 812 85.00 - 86.00 85.49

4 921 921 84.50 84.50

Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2

Head Weight Avg Wt Price Avg Price

2 450 450 106.00 106.00

10 647 647 98.00 98.00
 

Running Arrow Bill

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If you buy a calf, pay for it based on what it is worth day you take possession of it. If it is not a registered animal with all papers (or transfer papers) accompanying the animal, then consider paying the "mid-point" of current market price. For example: If bull calves are selling for .80 to .95 (per pound on hoof), pay 87.5 cents pound max. If you buy by pound on hoof, get it weighed on certified scale.
 

eric

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If this is a fairly young calf, and it is going to be your only calf, then you will have to wait until the calf is weaned from its mama before you can take possesion of it, assuming of course that you dont want to bottle feed him. So the neighbor is probably doing you a favor by making you wait until the calf is weaned, usually around 7 months of age.
There really isnt any reason for waiting a full yr to buy him, unless the neighbor wants to let him graze for free all summer and put on weight, then sell him to you at the increased weight. If you want to buy a young calf/heifer now, then just decline this offer and find another, preferably from another neighbor or out of the newspaper from somebody local. I would avoid the salebarn for my first calves, and try to establish a relationship with one of the local folks who will stay around and talk with you a little about the calves he is selling.
 

eric

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I don't want to get ripped off.And is there some website that explains all about buying beef,what to buy and not to buy?


I would put this forum up against any other website for overall quality and knowledge about the cattle industry! If you would go back through the beginner forum pages, I bet you will find 99% of any questions you will have will have been asked before. I have learned alot from this forum! There are guys who have been raising cattle all their life in here who just love to help beginners and have no problem sharing their knowledge. Then again, there are also some guys who think all questions are stupid questions, but dont them let them deter you, ask away and most folks are extremely helpful!
 

BLACKPOWER

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eric":1uj5hsb7 said:
I don't want to get ripped off.And is there some website that explains all about buying beef,what to buy and not to buy?


I would put this forum up against any other website for overall quality and knowledge about the cattle industry! If you would go back through the beginner forum pages, I bet you will find 99% of any questions you will have will have been asked before. I have learned alot from this forum! There are guys who have been raising cattle all their life in here who just love to help beginners and have no problem sharing their knowledge. Then again, there are also some guys who think all questions are stupid questions, but dont them let them deter you, ask away and most folks are extremely helpful!

Your questions are usually completely stupid though.
 
A

Anonymous

Radd,

I quickly read through the post and while I agree this is a great place to get info on cattle, I didn't see your question get answered, at least in laymans terms. If the seller waits until the calf is a yearling then he will weigh more therefore cost more. As la4angus stated in K- falls the prices are about $111.00 per 100 lbs or $1.11 per lbs. this will make a 500 lb steer about $600. Yearling calves will weigh in the ball park about 500 to 800 lbs roughly. I too would walk away from this, your nieghbor doesn't sound like he is doing you a favor, but we don't know his price.

I'm also from the portland area, go to any feed store and get a Capital Press newspaper, printed out of Salem, they come out every Friday. In the classified section with cattle for sale they will list the auction yard results from prior week. On Wed. Woodburn has a cattle aution and you can get an idea on prices and type of cattle around. Most of the auction yards will even give the shots, dehorn, and casterate the calves you purchase...just have a dry clean place (stall) and anti-biotics on hand you probably will need to treat any dehorned or castrated calves, these procedures do effect them. I too would have at least two animals, they are herd animal to them two is a herd. I would buy weaned calves starting out, they will cost about the same, but easier to handle, may not be so wild and likely to run over you. I have been back in this for about three years it's a great hobby, we don't get rich but it's fun. good luck!

Blackpowder- I have only read two of your post so far I hope you know Eric and I hope doesn't take you personally...but you are entertaining if nothing else...do you have any friends?

Alan
 

Jay

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BLACKPOWER":z1icwk6q said:
Your questions are usually completely stupid though.

You sure are grouchy somedays like you have lots of cramps.
Maybe we should rename you Mr. Midol. :lol:
Sorry--I couldn't resist! :shock:
 
A

Anonymous

I always get people wanting to buy a baby calf from me. I tell them basically the same thing, If you pay me what he will be worth at weaning you can have him other wise no. Once I get a calf on the ground the cost of putting another 600 pounds on him is minimal, why would I sell him for $200 when he will be worth $600 in a few months without much input?
 

Bez

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radd57

If you are as new as you say, then take the advice of those who say run away.

Bottom line is - cows are a great animal - even though I have to admit I got a real hate on for one today - 'nother story / 'nother time.

Until you have a better idea of what the heck an animal is worth - then go help your neighbour for a year - you'll learn a lot. Probably save some grief and certainly save a few bucks. Visit the local sale barn - keep your ears open - it's an experience you'll never forget.

Run away from this deal!!!!

When you know more, then it will be time to buy.

Best to all,

Bez
 

D.R. Cattle

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Anonymous":3eho4hb3 said:
I always get people wanting to buy a baby calf from me. I tell them basically the same thing, If you pay me what he will be worth at weaning you can have him other wise no. Once I get a calf on the ground the cost of putting another 600 pounds on him is minimal, why would I sell him for $200 when he will be worth $600 in a few months without much input?

This would have been my answer as well.
 

Running Arrow Bill

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Agree with other posters!

When our Longhorn calves from our registered stock hit the ground they are priced $500 minimum if all their parts are there. At weaning 6-7 months, they are $800 minimum. Prices go up from there, depending on a lot of factors. Of course, we don't sell at the sale barn.... A lot of pricing depends on their pedigree, horn growth and potential & weight monthly growth data, color, temperament, and other factors. We keep extensive, detailed records on all of our stock. Look at our and other Longhorn producers websites to see what's happening out there.

Bottomline: I'd think that ANY weaned calf of ANY breed that has good or better conformation should be worth at least $400 to 500 at weaning.
 

J Baxter

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Your neighbor is probably doing you both a favor. He will get the higher price and you will get a healthy calf. Calves that stay on momma til weaning time are healthier than bottle babies. I've got a deal cut on a set on brangus heifers that I will pick up later in the fall after they have been weaned.
 
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