Weight Gain

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Anonymous

This message is also posted on the Horse Talk board, but I am not getting any responses and I need some help. I have a horse who is 37 years old (yes, 37!!). He gets around just fine for his age, but my problem is putting and keeping weight on him. We had the vet check him awhile back and she told me to get his feed ground as fine as possible, which I did. He is a very good eater, and it doesn't seem to just be passing through him. Any suggestions on how to get his weight up for winter would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Anonymous

At 37, his teeth are likely a problem. Did your vet check for broken mouth? It may be as simple as floating his teeth. If the teeth are fine, his kidneys may not be fully functional. A CBC/profile may point out some problems. If all is clear, and he's fully dewormed (including tapes), alfalfa cubes sometimes will help out with weight--higher protein, already chewed into small pieces, as it were. Without seeing the animal, I'm stabbing in the dark. Good Luck V
 
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Anonymous

Congratulations! That is old...Old Bill who was over 30 started to get wasty like your companion and we supplied him with a cattle lick tub. Smart lick was the brand name. It is natural protein without urea. He loved the stuff and did gain some weight.... hair glossed up. It helped.

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Anonymous

Thanks everybody for your responses. I am gonna have the vet check him a little closer this time. I am also going to try to find the lick Bward was talking about.
 
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Anonymous

You've received some good advice. There are special "senior" feeds available commercially for older horses.

Friends who raise horses had an elderly gelding they kept going quite well. He was well into his mid 30's or older when he finally passed on. Up until the last couple of years of his life, plain alfalfa cubes kept him healthy.

The last couple of years they found if they put his alfalfa cubes into a bucket and added some water, he was able to chew and digest them quite well. Other than good vet care, as recommended here by others, the only other thing they did was provide him with a supplement tub. Their particular supplier was Winn, Inc., a Utah company that makes some good supplements. I'm sure there are other good ones out there. As Barb said, just make sure there is no urea in the supplement if you use a cattle supplement. If you're not sure, just go with a good supplement designed for horses.

<A HREF="http://www.key-lix.com/" TARGET="_blank">http://www.key-lix.com/</A>

Western Horseman magazine featured very elderly horses in a couple of its issues, I think it was last year. I loved reading those issues! The photos and descriptions by the owners were great.

> Thanks everybody for your
> responses. I am gonna have the vet
> check him a little closer this
> time. I am also going to try to
> find the lick Bward was talking
> about.
 

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